Theatrical fantasy

Lately, just recently, I’ve been allowing myself to entertain a fantasy. Since I heard about Mr. Armitage’s interest in doing “The Rover,” I’ve been gnashing my teeth that I probably couldn’t see it. I’d been thinking, though, that it was planned for the coming London season. I recently realized, in listening to one of these many interviews, that Mr. Armitage has been discussing it as if it would happen next year, by which I assume he means 2011. So it would be the 2011-12 season. Hypothetically.

What I’d been assuming was impossible was a trip over during the coming theatre season.

I am not going to pretend that I couldn’t afford to do this if I really wanted to, at least under normal circumstances. One of the great things about being single is that you don’t have to fight negotiate with anyone about how to spend your money. I could even do it pretty comfortably, if I cut down on discretionary spending in other areas, watched airline fares carefully, bought an economy ticket, timed the stay to maximize the ratio between ticket price and housing costs, stayed in a tourist hotel in Bayswater, ate most of my meals in Pret à Manger or as takeaway rather than in restaurants, and did the cheap London sightseeing as opposed to the expensive things. London is such an amazing place that that’s no punishment, and I’ve done many of the expensive and /or touristy things already anyway. If I could get in a few days at the BL I could potentially even call it a professional expense. Of course, I’d have to fit it in with the university calendar, which means the play would have to be running in either December or January.

But: that would be the most money I had ever spent on a something that can at best be called a hobby. One of the problematic things about being single is that there’s no one to talk you out of realizing your crazy dreams fantasies. The thought seems outrageous, to spend so much on something that is purely pleasure. And: the circumstances are not normal. I’ll be leaving the position I have in May 2011 and the odds that I’ll find another with a comparable salary are not especially high. Indeed, I may opt for a career move that substantially cuts my income. Thus I need to spend all of my spare income until further notice on eliminating debt and creating savings.

But somehow the idea that this could happen not this year, but late next, has winged my thoughts. I now ponder the possibility that I’ll find employment that pays well, and that it would be possible to spend a week in London. I think about buying tickets to a whole week of performances of “The Rover,” going with my notebook, watching different characters, making notes, musing, going back the next to answer the questions I generate, and to top it all off, blogging about it all in frightening detail. I even think about sending Mr. Armitage flowers before the performance on one night. I can’t quite think that I’d be able to make myself hang out at the stage door, though.

Somehow I love the fantasy of just exerting myself to go, seeing the performance numerous times (one would also have to, just in case Mr. Armitage were ill or indisposed and his understudy were playing his role on one of the nights), geeking out over detail, squeeing my way home on the tube — but never meeting the great man himself.

Can someone I’ve built up this much energy over possibly be as impressive in real life as he’s become in my fantasies?

~ by Servetus on July 9, 2010.

163 Responses to “Theatrical fantasy”

  1. Let me assure you, my dear, this same thought has run through my head many, many times once I figured out it would be 2011 when Richard plans to take to the stage again.

    I am not single, of course, having just celebrated my 25th wedding anniversary to a wonderful man amazingly understanding about my RA-mania (“I really feel sorry for that guy sometimes, you know, Ang?”). The man who offered to buy himself some black leather pajamas . . .

    The thought of getting to see RA in a stage production, a Restoration comedy that is a sexy romp in the woods – oh, my. It sends frissons of delight running through me like nobody’s business.

    I think of cutting back on lunches out, holding a massive yard sale (so much to get rid of from our house and my late mother’s home), resisting the urge to order more books from Amazon, cutting back on my mascara and lippie splurges (I am such a girlie-girl) . . . but I haven’t actually discussed this with the afore-mentioned spouse.

    I fear he might think I was planning to abduct Mr. A and smuggle him back to the U.S. to keep in the basement (if we had one, that is). Really, all I want is to see him emoting in his glorious flesh, to hear that dark chocolate voice in person, to be in his presence. yes, to drool and thud and swoon and giggle and geek out and be the total fan girl.

    And I wonder the same thing, my dear. Can he be as stunning, alluring, captivating and indescribably delicious as I write him and imagine him to be?? Could I possibly be disappointed in any way, have my lovely bubble burst?

    What a quandary. (And as it’s been a decade since I visited London, I would dearly love to go back. Dining at Pret a Manger would suit me just fine . . .)

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    • Yeah, I was concerned that I might be running down Pret a Manger, where I actually like to eat. When my parents visited Europe a few years ago while I was on sabbatical, they wanted to eat every meal there.

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      • We discovered Pret a Manger when I took a small group of high school students to England and France back in ’99 . . . everybody loved it, the food was tasty, fresh and quite reasonable. We went back several times, as I recall. ( :

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  2. I guess if you are looking for a sensible answer — don’t read my comment. Because I say…Go for it! You won’t regret it. Life is too short for “what ifs.” Maybe you could turn this blog and your experience (s) into a book…Confessions of a FanGirl. Is that already a book? Or you could go another route and write fiction or combine the two. Who knows? Yes, we have all taken our “hobby” I step too far, but have you seen some people’s ideas of hobbies…golf, knitting, collecting trains, so your hobby is Mr. Armitage. Big deal. We are all right there with you.

    It sounds like your life is “in transition,” but don’t let that stop you in this adventure. I have a feeling you won’t regret this. Besides you have to go for all the girls, like me, who will be stuck at home with hubby and kids. I love my hubby, but let me tell you he has a belly, not like Mr. Armitage, in your pos the other day, but a “real” belly.

    What did Mrs. Hale say to Margaret,”Go and experience the fair for me and then come home and tell me all about it.” I am paraphrasing, but I am sure someone will post the correct quote for me.

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    • Thanks for the supportive vote, Rob!

      Actually I’ve plotted a book based on this blog, but it seems like it’s been done before (Julie and Julia). It was a fun exercise, though.

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      • Julie and Julia is diff thou. I wouldn’t discount this idea and your impulse to write it.

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        • The thing is that it’s hard to figure out how the narrative closes except with the disapproval of the wish-object. It seemed to me totally expected that the RL Julia Child would disapprove of her blogger. But the opposite would not be credible at all. The book would have to have some kind of postmodern ending.

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  3. I’ve already made up my mind that I’ll be going so see Richard in any play he chooses to do on the stage, but it’s an easier trip from Norway. Why don’t we all meet up in London? You could arrange an Armitage seminar at the BL, servetus, and we sould all claim expenses?

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    • Maybe we could get the BL to time it with a Blake exhibit as well. 🙂 Since you are the Porter Chair, I’ll expect a syllabus from you for the seminar soon.

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    • Well, darling Milly, I would certainly love the chance to meet you and some of my other RA fandom friends. The idea of an Armitage seminar at the BL sounds delightful to me.

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  4. You are definitely not alone. In fact, I’ve already set up my SmartyPig goal-based savings account–pathetically entitled “Richard the Rover”–to enable me to spend a week in GB and attend multiple performances next year. LOL! I’m single and newly self-employed and sometimes it is a struggle to save or spend on luxuries, but I agree with @Rob–life’s too short to wait to experience the things that are important to us. And, who is to say what is “important” enough to take up one’s time and/or money besides the person (or SO of the person-ha!) spending the money? I’ll have to cut waaaay back, but I’ll get far more out of that week in London than I would from a shelf full of DVDs, a squeaky clean car, or a another pair (or 20) of high heels. Maybe most would consider spending a couple thousand dollars to see a man on stage ridiculous and fangurl-ish, but I find the idea to be deliciously grown-up–the kind of thing I always imagined I could do when I finally “made it”.

    As for RA not living up to the sky-high standards we have for him, I don’t think it is possible. I’ve yet to see him put a professional foot wrong, even in the admittedly sub-par productions in which he’s occasionally appeared. We know he’s a private person–none of us are expecting him to leap off of the stage, snatch us from the audience, and Calgon us away from our tedious lives (sorry…I don’t know how my journal entry got on here). As you said above, it isn’t even about meeting him in person; it’s about continuing to explore a personal and fulfilling interest, something all of your readers have acknowledged adds joy to their lives and helps them to get through the day. Besides, he could give the worst performance of his life and I’d still be in raptures and, from reading your blog, I know you’d analyse every movement or phrase and find thousands of ways to make the bad seem worth pondering.

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    • Side note of no importance: I find it very amusing that I spelled “analyze” with an “s”. The influence of all of the English literature I’ve been reading since infected with the RA virus, I guess.

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    • Also, thanks for the compliment above. It’s nice to have my preoccupation with the mediocre validated. Seriously !! I often wonder if it’s worth writing about second-rate product just because Mr. Armitage appears in it.

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  5. In years to come you’ll find that this is not nearly as mad as you currently think. Despite being a mature, ‘sensible’ person, I did the fangirl thing in the opposite direction (UK to Canada) starting in 1998 and have done it around 8 times in total. No-one in our group (married, single or whatever) who has done it has ever regretted it. I’ve just returned from the final one (obsessions DO end eventually!)
    RA is so much more available for me, and next year’s trip to a couple of performances of The Rover will seem positively pedestrian.
    BTW, do we know for sure it will be performed only in London and not the provinces?

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  6. Agree with all the responses. (vivicosse – WHO did you pursue to Canada?! I mean, who comes here, except to Toronto? Just curious…and obviously not a Torontonian – we love to hate them, but are too polite to otherwise attack them)

    So far, I haven’t pursued a “crush”. But I’d happily combine a trip to London, which I love, with an evening at the theatre with Mr. Armitage, in pursuit of obsession with medieval history, of course. Of which, the latter might be better found outside London. Well, we can rationalise it. I have a friend at the British Library…

    I really don’t think this actor would disappoint in a production of The Rover. He’s well suited to classical comedy.

    And golf, knitting etc. are for the birds. Better an actor who provides the catalyst for examining beyond him to discoursing on topics wider and further.

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  7. Believe me, I am not bragging, but I would watch the play several times, and at least once go to the stage door. I have done it when Robert Lindsay played “The Entertainer”, and “Aristo” in Chichester and chatted to him. He was charming, so I had no problem. I can’t imagine Richard would be different.

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  8. fitzg, Montreal, actually. My former site – http://www.roydupuis-online.com/contents.htm

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    • Hey, vivecosse, what an interesting site! I love the way it sifts between different kinds of information. Seeing this made me feel a little less self-conscious about my own activities.

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  9. @vivecosse, Roy Dupuis, of Maurice Richard, “Shake Hands with the Devil”, and on a less serious note “Nikita”? Are there some qualities reminiscent of Mr Armitage in M Dupuis?

    I’m on C19, Tim Horton’s, if you wish to chat off-line. Cheers!

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  10. Just don’t be disappointed if he does not do the Rover or any other play. He has said that he would like to return to the stage many times before (though arguably never mentioned a definite play) and it has never come to anything. He might do more Spooks and/or more Strike Back or his planned trip to LA might lead to something that prevents him from doing a stage play next year or something new might turn up. I do not doubt that he would like to do that play but nothing is fixed yet and going by past experiences I won’t believe it until it is official. Over the last years he has been in demand for TV work and apparently he does not dare to let an offer go.

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    • Well, and he shouldn’t be disappointed if I don’t come to see it seven times, right? It’s all fantasy at this point.

      On some level I’d prefer it if he’d stick to tv — makes it easier for me to see it. 🙂

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  11. @jane, I think you are very right here. This is a working actor. Bills to pay, a bit of food is required. Etc. I do think that stage would provide, especially comedic talent. But, wherever M. A goes next, support is not lacking from these quarters.

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  12. I probably should title this post “Cautionary Tales.” I want to raise the question: what’s the line between being a fan and being an obsessive? Are there lines that shouldn’t be crossed? If so, what are they?

    I’ve been following RA’s career for five years, since “North and South” first showed in the US. I have a couple of stories to tell, and I promise you, they’re true.

    Tale 1: When the interior scenes of “The Vicar of Dibley” were being filmed and RA was a guest star, many of his supporters were able to get tickets to the filming. Many others who weren’t so lucky came to the studio in hopes of seeing RA on his way in or out of it. (Unfortunately, this didn’t happen.) A friend of mine was one of the many women outside the studio, waiting, and she was surprised by part of what went on. Many of the fans had brought things for RA, and at a certain point some workers came out of the building to collect them. My friend said that the workers came out with large bin liners–the American equivalent is big black Hefty bags–and fans turned over bags full of things: copies of “North and South” to be signed, wrapped presents, and letters–long letters. She said that almost all of the many letters she saw turned over to the workers were several pages long–8 to 12, say. The episode left her feeling surprised and sad, because she found it unlikely that RA would actually want to read scores of eight page letters, and–fan though she is–she felt that some of the people there might have invested a little too much emotion in RA. Had they? I’m sure that the books got signed and people who wrote letters received signed pictures; RA is notoriously good about that, and has almost invariably responded pleasantly to fans he meets. So make of this what you will.

    Tale 2: I’m a member of a message board for fans of RA. Four or five years ago, when “Robin Hood” was filming in Hungary, a German fan reported that she stopped by the set with her two kids and was lucky enough to see RA heading for his trailer. He was friendly, posed for pictures with his arm around her and the kids in front, and gave her a kiss on the cheek–he was, as usual, charming.

    I think that this incident may have triggered some planning in the mind of one of the board members who posted very often–a prominent fan on the board. It appears that she planned her vacation at a time when RA would still be filming in Hungary, and made her vacation plans accordingly. When she returned from her vacation she wrote a post to the effect that she had fulfilled her dream of meeting RA, he is even more gorgeous in person, and since she had achieved her goal she was deleting her membership.

    This caused some consternation. What exactly happened? Why would someone who posted on the message board several times a day simply leave because she had met RA?

    I don’t know what happened. She didn’t confide in me. But a friend who was close to a moderator told me that the very tight-lipped version of things she got from the mod was that he recognized her, and “he was not nice to her.”

    What on earth happened? Why would a charming, notoriously affable actor behave in a way that would result in a huge fan wanting to withdraw immediately and completely from a fan community that had clearly been an important part of her life? How did he recognize her, and why would that recognition eventuate in an episode in which “he was not nice to her”? And what form did “not being nice” take? I have no idea. I do know that the moderators of that board wrote a thread titled “The Fan Actor Relationship” recommending that fans should not do certain things that could seem like harassment to an actor: repeatedly sending gifts or letters, going to an actor’s home or hotel room, and so on. (This caused quite a controversy; the suggestion that an actor could feel harassed by a fan who sent repeated gifts or letters seemed to hit a nerve in some board members. Others wrote that they admired the member who had planned her vacation around seeing RA and said they might just do the same. Still others who had been victims of stalkers took a very different stance.)

    What’s the line? When has a fan spent too much time watching / listening to RA? What’s reasonable behavior? When does a pleasant, engaging hobby turn into an obsession? What crosses the line? Was it right to plan that Hungarian vacation around meeting RA? I ask these questions in part because (1) I think that RA has many more fans now than he once did, and there’s always the chance that a very small minority will behave in ways that lead him to feel uncomfortable, or not to be “nice” to them, and (2) RA, it seems to me, has distanced himself from his fans relatively recently, to some extent; that may mean that he has at least sometimes found fans’ enthusiasm off-putting. What is the line between normalcy and obsession? What is the line between civilized fan behavior–the norm among RA’s fans, I think–and obtrusive, bad behavior?

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  13. Anonymous academic,

    You bring up some excellent points. I have noticed Richard seeming to cool toward his fans in recent interviews and articles. And I don’t think it’s toward all fans, but toward what I hope is a small minority who have crossed that line from fandom into unhealthy obsession and stalkerish behavior.

    I have a very, very slight celebrity as a newspaper writer and columnist for the past decade and I have had to deal with a couple of incidents where a reader decided they knew me a great deal better than they actually did.

    We ultimately had to ban one fellow from posting on our website. I am a friendly and polite person, a people-pleaser, if you will, but I felt very uncomfortable with these situations.
    Just because I am in the public eye on a regular basis, both through my writing and the fact I appear at so many events around the area, doesn’t mean anyone can lay claim to “owning” me. (The long, squirmingly intimate letter from a prisoner who had been given some newspapers by a fellow inmate gave me a few sleepless nights as well, I have to confess.)

    And I suspect some fans out there try to do lay claim to dear Richard, who has been such a generous, sweet, polite fellow with his fans. In the end, public figures, and an actor is that, are still human beings who deserve our respect as well as our adulation. Especially someone like Richard who is a private person and such a consummate professional who behaves himself on and off set.

    As much as I joke about kidnapping him and such, the truth is, I would never want to treat RA in real life with less than admiration, respect and appreciation. And part of appreciating someone is not overstepping boundaries.

    Personally, I do think sending an overabundance of gifts and long letters repeatedly, and actually planning vacations around catching him on set or at home (as opposed to working seeing a stage performance into your itinerary) is overstepping those boundaries. Thank goodness the majority of his fans do believe in more civilised and rational behavior.

    Just my take on it as a fan of the dear fellow and as a person who’s been there in a very small way.

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    • There’s something interesting in your post that also relates to the internet; that is, we all assume that when someone talks about kidnapping Mr. Armitage, they’re joking. I assumed you were! And yet humor is one of the hardest things to convey electronically and personally. Some of the discourse strands about proper fan behavior toward Mr. Armitage do seem to imply that such statements should not be made, even in jest, because someone could misunderstand.

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      • Since I would be totally appalled at the idea of anyone actually kidnapping our dear RA – he ends up bound and stuffed in trunks and tossed in the back of cars far too much in his roles as it is – I would dearly hope no one takes such a remark I make seriously.

        That being said, I do shy away from posting at most forums in case some very serious-minded individual might take something I say in jest literally. Some things Richard said jokingly in interviews in the past have been twisted in such a way certain fans have allowed themselves to become all huffy. Another reason why I think he has tended to back away a bit . . . just my thoughts on it.

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        • That’s true … his characters lead really rough lives. It’s nice of you to give them such fulfilling sex lives to make up for the wear and tear they experience in their canon lives. 🙂 (big grin)

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          • *grin* Those characters do need some serious R&R after all the punishing wounds, blows, shackles, ropes and other unpleasantries they endure. I consider it a sort of – civic duty to provide such outlets for them. I am very altruistic at heart . . .

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  14. @vivicosse – yes, under the same blog name. On Tim Horton’s, where shy little Canadians hang out. Hello, Phylly3. et al.

    angieklong, you say it well for this lot of admiters of a just very good actor. I think of sending a St. Crispin silver medal to his agents, with the description of Crispin (the patron of leather-workers – don’t fall your chairs laughing) but won’t.

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    • I think this would be a funny gift. I personally think that any gift giving is fine provided the gift is not dangerous or in questionable taste and that it is given without expectation of return. Those are my general rules for gift giving and I don’t see why they should be suspended just for a celebrity giftee. I derive a great deal of pleasure from making gifts “just because.”

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      • Here, here! I don’t think we should ever give a gift to anyone, friend, family member or celebrity alike, with conditions tied to it. If it’s safe and in good taste and something the recipient will enjoy, go for it.

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  15. fitzg, I am giggling over the St. Crispin’s medal idea. Shades of the glorious Guy and his snug black leathers!

    I have toyed with writing him a letter – not a long one that would tax the man’s patience and make him question having another nutter for a fan – but simply to say how much I enjoy his performances, his dedication to his craft and the way he uses all at his disposal – that marvelous instrument of a voice, his physicality and expressive facial features – to create such compelling and believable characters. But I never get around to it. Bet he’d smile over that St. Crispin’s medal, though. *wink*

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  16. @another anonymous academic, what you said accords with my reading of RA info on the Web, over six months. Enthusiastic, we might be. But, with sites such as this one, attracting like-minded people, “obsession”, if that’s what it is, is not an entree to behaving badly.

    For another reference, the Spooks Fan Blog and re-watch of Spooks 7, discussing roles, scripting, cinematography, is also a good place to go. As is this one.

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    • “obsession … is not an entree to behaving badly” … I’d add, because we all know where the lines are. Or at least where we think they are. But it’s been interesting to me how tense some people have gotten when my lines didn’t correspond with theirs …

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  17. @angieklong, what can I say? Couldn’t find any trace of a St. Richard. Leathers, indeed! Of course, being the nicely-raised, shy little person, I wouldn’t do it. But if anyone braver wants to adopt the idea, I really think it wouldn’t be an example of “fans behaving badly”. Do you think?

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  18. @fitzg, I totally think Richard would absolutely appreciate the thought and not be offended in the least if someone gave him a St. Crispin’s medal along with that delightful bit of info concerning leather workers. He has a proper sense of humour, our boy, and I could easily see him bringing it up with a smile in an interview in much the same way as he did the t-shirt with Guy depicted as a hard rock musician on tour. The medal is a much better idea than sending him, say, a pair of men’s underpants with his picture on them (didn’t some fan actually do that??)

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  19. angieklong, I have a sense of what you are talking about. I am possibly outing myself a bit: I’m not a celebrity, but I was stalked by two men–one for years, before the police were willing to concern themselves; he’s the one whose threats to fly from Los Angeles to the UK to “visit” me there forced me to move almost overnight, with no forwarding address. When he could find me, my heart would sink when I’d come home to a white rose taped to the door, or a massive street sign he thought I’d like. He had ways of letting me know he’d watched me go in and out of my home. The police got more interested when he cut my phone line (I had no cell). That’s long over, but about six months ago I got a letter from a former student who had found my home address and had read everything I’ve ever written that’s on the internet. (It’s a wonder he didn’t die of boredom.) There was a certain amount of sexual innuendo in the letter. It made me sick to think of him knowing where I live. The sad thing is that he must imagine that I look the same as I did 25 years ago, when I taught him! I wrote back forcefully enough so that he knows if he ever contacts me again his letter (and the creepy email that he sent beforehand, when I marked his mail as spam) will be handed straight to the police. (I have to say, incidentally, that at my best I wasn’t outrageously attractive. I look normal.) I know that none of these are representative examples of what RA’s fans might do, but there’s no telling; what seems normal to one fan seems over the top to another. Early on, shortly after “North and South” showed and before he knew to hide his personal details from the public, two cheerful members went to RA’s home to drop off a fan letter to him; he wasn’t home, so they just left it, but . . . it must have seemed like normal, okay behavior to them; it seems over the top to me.

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  20. I think planning a vacation to see him perform in a play, is waaay different than planning a vacation to go to a TV set or his hotel room in the hopes of meeting him.

    From what I took from this post, is that Servetus is worried that seeing him perform in the play might be disappointing, not meeting him in person.

    Honestly, the behavior Another anonymous academic described about the fan behavior in her comment, was in my mind, was going way to far. It is one thing to do see an actor perform on stage, it is another thing entirely to go with the expectation of meeting said actor.

    In my mind, it crosses the line when a fan starts sending repeated letters, gifts, starts hanging out trying to meet the actor, or starts thinking that there is a chance said actor would date or fall in love with said fan.

    Harassment is just icky all around. I believe if the fan is sending a gift or letter to say hey, “I really like you and your work is one thing,” if they are sending things thinking that the actor is going to fall in love with them. That’s a bit scary. I believe it is the intention behind the gesture.

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    • This was really helpful; I think that I closed the post with the wrong question. See the next post when it appears. You really helped me clear up some stuff.

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  21. @ Servitus – no way would I spend my precious annual leave and savings travelling 24 hours in a long haul flight to see this play 🙂 – what if RA was sick on the night and his understudy had to play the role?? If however I happened to be in London for another reason and it coincided with the performances, I would consider going but only if I was there anyway. (If the play was put on in Sydney then yes, I would go). The play has to fit in with my circumstances if I am to see it, and I would not try to arrange my life to see a play he was in, or anything else for that matter.

    @ anonymous academic, thanks for sharing – I remember reading about the fan going to Budapest and how sad I felt for that person (ie. the need they obviously felt to meet RA) – I also remember the discussion on the Fan/Actor Relationship board that followed and the accounts from people who have been stalked themselves.

    I sense there is a great deal of confusion on the boards about the level of support they feel they need to show RA…. it’s kind of nurturing but also a bit OTT and is it really necessary?? Your account of being a victim of stalking brings home the fact that maybe we should be placing ourselves in RA’s shoes and trying to get a sense of what it must be like for him to be the focus of so much attention. With work visits, I don’t think I would be inclined to appreciate a social visit from a stranger given how much energy I have to give to my job and the children I work with – I could well imagine that RA would quite possibly find fans turning up at his workplace an intrusion and be unable to give the time to them. What did they expect, I wonder?

    @Servitus – sorry, slight threadnap but great discussion! A play is different and only you can weigh up the pros and cons of spending holidays and money on visiting London. I have the advantage of distance so it is not even tempting to consider. My concern about the play is the behaviour of fans who want to stand outside the stage door – will RA be allowed a moment’s peace or will he be too accessible? That’s his decision to make and he made mention of this in a recent interview. I’m wondering if he will be put off doing the play beacuse of unwanted attention?

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    • I have to say that I don’t like unannounced visits at work either, mostly because my work days are so jampacked. Presumably something like a stage door is an inbetween venue, that is, it’s not work, per se, but it’s also not private. It’s an acknowledged liminal space where an actor can be seen and/or spoken too.

      One would think that if Mr. Armitage is serious about taking a stage engagement that he’s already thought through the question of stage door exits and how he plans to deal with them. Or hope that he would have. Presumably theatres also have mechanisms in operation to keep fans under control.

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      • @ servetus

        Surely the theatres do have those safeguards in place as you say. There have been many celebs with strong fan bases who have performed on stage and I haven’t heard yet of some disastrous event occurring (granted, I am across the pond, but such things have a way of making their way onto the Worldwide Web) . . . and I do remind myself Richard is a very intelligent fellow. I am sure he can sort it all out.

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  22. @another anonymous academic,

    My heart goes out to you for what you experienced. It’s a very unpleasant feeling, isn’t it? The fellow who kept after me via the website was someone I had never met and I had no idea what he looked like, so it made me really paranoid when I was by myself at night. I was sort of looking over my shoulder a lot more than usual.

    And good grief, he’s apparently almost young enough to be my son and he was suggesting I become the mother of his children (which I think is an impossibility at my age, anyway) . . I could not read the entire letter from the prisoner as it was getting much too sexual in nature. Thankfully when he got out of prison six months later, he didn’t come round to look me up.

    @mulinbinba,

    We definitely need to try to put ourselves in Richard’s shoes and ask ourselves, how would we feel if people were treating us the same way as certain overly obsessed fans do him?

    Also, having just conducted an interview with a cousin who is also a well-respected singer/songwriter, I came away with some points to ponder. He once toured as an opening act with a major country star in the 80s and also spent some time in Hollywood when this musician was performing in a movie. My cousin said while he’d had a wonderful life doing what he loved most and made many, many friends along the way, he would never have wanted the kind of fame this man had. “Angie, he couldn’t even go to the bathroom without somebody bothering him . .. I would have hated that!”

    So, yes, as Richard’s fame grows – and as more people get to see what an amazing talent he is, that is sure to happen – sadly, the more people there will likely be who try to invade his privacy in the name of “just being a fan.” So you could be right, he might put off doing a play for such a reason. Which is a shame, because he deserves to vary his acting venues as he sees fit. (That being said, I would be quite envious of all the ladies who do get to see him on stage . . . sigh.)

    Servetus, you’ve certainly got a lively and interesting discussion started here!

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  23. My cute-enough-to-be-stalked days are long over (one reward of growing older), but thank you for your kind words, angieklong. Creepy, isn’t it?

    I think RA has been remarkably kind to fans who show up on the Spooks or Robin Hood sets, or passersby who come across Spooks being filmed. Hmm, how do I feel about former students who drop by work (not exactly fans, but the best comparison I can come up with)? I don’t mind at all if a former student who thought I was a good teacher shows up in my work life, and I try to be gracious (even if I don’t actually remember the name or face). But I’m trying to imagine how I’d react if my former student who wrote me an inappropriate email laced with sexual innuendo suddenly turned up at my workplace: standing at the back of a hall I was teaching in, say, or dropping by my office hours (when I have an open door for up to two hours and anyone can walk in to talk to me–and I can’t make an excuse to leave). I think I would not “be nice,” and my public persona is pretty nice. And if a former student popped by my house without my okay? I wouldn’t answer the door, frankly. It’s an intrusion.

    I know that years ago, when the worst of these stalkers showed up at a party and began taking flash pictures of me, I screamed at him, and when that didn’t discourage him I threw a drink in his face, which did. And you know what? It didn’t stop him for long–he turned up in my life again. Can you imagine? After someone has screamed “LEAVE ME ALONE!” at you? But I don’t regret the screaming or the tossed drink. Clearly I am not a nice, tolerant, understanding person. If I was an actor I don’t think I’d be the notoriously nasty Kevin Spacey, but not “being nice” to someone who was harassing me . . . yep, I can see how even RA might be pushed to extremes.

    And that’s more than enough about my life, I fear.

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    • This is interesting because it raises the question of exactly when one is “in public” as a known entity vs. when one is in private. I’m a professor and a state employee and that means that certain things about me are public information: my annual salary, for example, which you can google; my office hours, which anyone can attend; the dates and times of my lectures, and my syllabi, which are by state law public records. Recently the dean of my college started a campaign to get every professor to put his/her picture on the department web pages. This really bugged me for some reason; I didn’t feel like the university had a right to post a picture of me, and in order to get the nagging secretary off my back I wrote a letter asking whether posting a picture of me was a condition of continuing employment. Am I “in public” every time I am in “in public”? For example, I’ve had the experience of having to abandon favorite cafés because students figured out where I was and tried to talk to me there instead of in office hours. I figure that at home I’m not required to open the door to anyone except the police and the landlord with 24 hours notice, but what happens if I order a pizza delivered while I’m grading in my jammies and answer the door in a bathrobe and the delivery person is a student? (yes, this has happened to me).

      My impression is that from the stalker’s point of view there is no “bad” attention. If they can’t get a smile they’ll settle for a scream, no?

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      • @ servetus,

        Long ago, when I was a new teacher at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, I recall a in-seesion training in which the instructor pointed out for some students, “negative attention is better than no attention at all.”
        Better to make someeone upset with you than to feel you are being ignored . . .
        I’d say that applies to these stalkers.

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  24. Creepy is exactly the word, another anon. academic. Before I ventured into journalism, I was a teacher before some health issues required me to take some time off. I still run into my former students quite often. Many remember my classes with fondness and I recall most of them fondly (there are a couple who could fall off the face of the earth and it wouldn’t bother me) and I am generally glad to have a quick chat. Actually, one of them is my pharmacist and her husband and fellow former student is my optometrist, so it’s been great to see them go on and do well in life.

    However, if the former students started showing up routinely at my office, where there are far too many distractions as it is, I wouldn’t like it. And if they drove up unannounced to my rural-and-not-exactly-on-the-beaten-path house (as one did, come to think of it) I didn’t and wouldn’t answer the door, either. We all need our private time and yes, that would be an intrusion.

    I was brought up and now live in the deep South where friendliness and hospitality are important, but so are good manners and common courtesy. Stalking and harassing people does not fall into those categories.

    You were perfectly within your rights to do some screaming and tossing of drinks, as far as I am concerned.

    And, yes, Richard totally has my back if he ever feels the need to be less than “nice” to anyone who treats him in such a disrespectful manner. Even nice guys have their limits of what they can endure.

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  25. Everyone, and @anyone who has been stalked. That is just awful. The invasion is too much to think of. I wouldn’t go to London JUST to see Mr. Armitage in a play – but to time it for visiting friends, and feeding the medieval and art history obsession. And, of course, taking in the play. Nor am I about to look for a Crispin medal – it’s just pleasant to think about.

    Being middle-aged (and probably a BBC4 listener, if I lived there :}), and brought-up nicely in the South (just north of the 49th parallel, that is), and polite, etc, all those Canadian stereotypes, I just like Mr. Armitage’s acting, but I’m definitely not a female version of a back-door Johnny.

    But I’m with servetus, time a visit to coincide with potential stage presence, combined with other interests.

    @servetus, your site is an excellent venue for expressing appreciation of, and attraction to, this actor. In good ways. Not over the top.

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  26. Well said, @fitzg. Here, here to Servetus! And thanks to one more lurker to directing me to this excellent venue, indeed!

    May I also add I deeply appreciate the fact those who post here also seem to have a solid grasp of the language and such niceties as proper grammar and spelling. I remain appalled at the laziness and/or ignorance of so many in Internet Land who don’t and nevertheless post. An occasional typo is one thing; failing to grasp the rudiments of English 101 is another.

    And a trip to London where I could meet up with my English friends, re-visit some spots and discover new ones in that endlessly fascinating city would be such a delight in and of itself. To get the bonus of seeing Mr. A on stage would simply be the yummy icing on the delicious cake. ( :

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  27. On obsessive behaviour – is a trip to the theatre (albeit at significant cost of time and money) any more obsessive than constant repeated rewatchings of particular recorded performances? How do you compare the emotional investment in a 12 page fan letter with months of blogging on the subject?
    I’m not getting at you, servetus; just identifying that, by virtue of being here, everyone is ‘obsessed’ to some degree, and however intellectual one purports to be, it’s not unnatural to want to experience the physical presence of the object of that obsession. (Even fan-mobbed celebrities have their icons.) It may even serve as a catharsis.
    So, how to set the boundaries for achieving this outcome without becoming a stalker? I’ve not been around long enough to have read the aforementioned Fan/Actor Relationship discussions, but I would suggest these 2 rules of thumb:

    Firstly, plan to attend only ticketed events – plays, film premieres, fund-raisers etc. Your presence is therefore part of the work schedule, not an intrusion on it. Personally, I would include a post-performance stage-door Jenny episode as a traditional and entirely acceptable activity, as long as it doesn’t get physically dangerous. I can’t imagine any actor turning down a play because of the prospect of an appreciative crowd at the stage door.

    Secondly, work on the assumption that there is only one Personality here, and it’s not you. If you recognise him, that’s an acknowledgement of his success. If he recognises you, you’ve probably gone too far. You can express admiration in a 1 page letter – the other 11 are about you, and therefore an intrusion on his time. Donate to his charities, don’t clutter his life with stuff of your choosing. Expect no personal acknowledgement, no special treatment. It’s the deluded outliers on the spectrum that give fandoms their bad reputations.

    RA is not going to be remotely discomfited by the sale of a few theatre tickets to an anonymous audience member (while he may wince at the scrutiny to which he’s subjected on this blog!) Your concern seems to be some guilt over the prospect of spending so much money on a hobby, but if you were to cost the time you spent on this blog (and extrapolate this out to 2011) it may seem like a more reasonable expense in order to take that involvement to a new level. Assuming you really can afford it without losing a home or a kidney, then you shouldn’t miss an opportunity that would obviously give you so much pleasure.

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    • This was kind of a vital comment: thanks. It parses the distinctions between normal and weird quite well, while still leaving open the burning question of what the difference is between a 12 page fan letter directed at him and a blog that is now reaching the length of a mid-sized academic monograph. That’ what I have to figure out next.

      Thanks also for thinking I could do something like my fantasy without turning into a stalker. It was affirming. 🙂

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  28. A few years ago, my Aunt and Uncle went to Dubai to see Tiger Woods play in a golf turnament. People travel far and wide to see sports figures, bands, etc. all the time If you are going to see him perform and then blog about the play and his performance. I support you 100%. If you are going for any other reason, than I would not recommend going.

    As @Vivecosse stated, if he can recongise you, then you have gone too far. Nick Hornby’s Juliet Naked is a book about just this sort of thing. I have a friend who is an actress, and when she started talking about fan letters, and emails she has received over the years, it puts this all into perspective. I think supporting a performer is one thing, when fans start expecting things, whatever those things are, then it has gone too far.

    In lieu, of Tiger Wood’s behavior that maybe wasn’t the best example. 🙂

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  29. @rob; your aunt and uncle wouldn’t have known of Tiger Woods bahavior at that time! 🙂

    I always take in a play whenever I’m in London, so making an effort to see RA on the stage when I admire his work fits into that. I assume most of the people who post on here would be very cautious about approaching him in his own time as the well-behaved people that we are!

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  30. I think it goes back to putting yourself in the performer’s place. Everyone wants to know their work and talents are appreciated; I certainly enjoy it when newspaper readers tell me, “I really enjoy your articles, you’re a good writer.”
    I don’t think our shy and modest RA is any different in valuing that feedback from viewers of the work he has invested so much time, energy and talent into getting right.

    However, it’s when fans start having those unreasonable expectations – I’m going to become the best friend he can’t go on without having in his life, become his lover, bear his children, et al. – then that is a serious problem. Fantasy and reality have become blurred to a potentially dangerous level.

    Thankfully, the ladies at this board seem to be able to make that distinction. Obsessed we may be, but I don’t think any of us have, or will, venture into Stalker Land re RA.

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    • This is the problem, right? Presumably he wants to sell tickets to the play and that’s one consideration in being cast, that he’s a known quantity and that fans will buy in. When does that get to be too much? When does the rest of the cast of the play think “oh, we’re playing to Armitage’s audiences”?

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      • @ servetus,

        That’s an excellent question. If you are a lesser-known cast member who has not built up a large fan base, would you be green with envy over the suspicion all those wide-eyed audience members were there solely to watch Mr. A?
        But then again, I largely listened to “Clarissa” because Richard was in it, but I heartily enjoyed many of the other performances, and would enjoy hearing future radio plays with some of those same actors.
        If they are really talented performers, shouldn’t they be glad to have large audiences to display their abilities before, no matter who initially drew them to the theatre?

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  31. I also think that there are ways in which obsessions can be harmful when a fan isn’t a stalker–but the harm in such a case is to the fan. It’s easy to imagine a teenager getting so caught up in a celebrity that she spends endless hours in chatrooms, on message boards, watching performances, writing 12 page fan letters, writing and reading fanfic, and so on, to the point that she doesn’t spend anywhere enough time on homework and fails her courses and exams. We’re usually less aware that it’s perfectly possible for adults to do the same thing; mature adults don’t go crazy for a celebrity in that way . . . do they? Well, sometimes they do. It sneaks up on you.

    It is a real problem, especially today; it wasn’t possible to spend endless hours on the internet thinking about the Beatles because there wasn’t an internet, but if you think about it, RA wouldn’t have an “army” of fans–frequently mature women with responsibilities–without it. I think that things get harmful when an interest in a celebrity begins to have an impact on the fan’s work, family, or social life. It’s easy to get so invested that it’s a constant temptation to be a fan when one should be working as an employee, and it can creep up into the life of successful, mature professionals who might look back years later and be appalled at the time it took away from work (or, worse yet, for the fact that it got them fired). If you’re not functioning as a family member because you’re being a fan, that’s a problem; if being a fan replaces having RL friends or a partner (who could compare with the celebrity??) a fan’s in trouble. I think the fan / actor relationship has the potential to harm both fans and actors. Yes, anyone who is here is “obsessed” to a greater or lesser degree; the question is, is it harming a fan’s work life or friendships, or causing problems with a partner; or is being a fan getting in the way of having a RL social life? It’s easy to imagine that cyberfriends are real friends, but we’re not going to visit each other in the hospital, meet for a meal and talk about our lives in detail . . . and Riohard Armitage isn’t going to love us for richer or for poorer, for better or for worse, but a RL partner might.

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  32. @aaa

    You are certainly on the money there. When I was a teenager, fangirls had to rely on teen magazines, plastering posters on the walls and hoping to get tickets to concerts to see their favorite pop star. They couldn’t spend hours upon hours on the internet getting their fangirl fixes as so many do today.

    It’s all too easy for kids AND adults to become so involved in cyberspace they neglect school, work, and RL relationships. I’ve actually seen this happen in terms of gamers, people who are constantly immersed in some online fantasy role-playing game.

    One former co-worker used to stay up all night at the computer and then show up the next day wearing the same clothes from the day before and you didn’t want to stand downwind of him, if you catch my drift. He was a very socially inept person in RL, and I don’t think this exactly helped his plight. ( ; Apparently he was also into internet porn, which is a whole other can of worms that can also become a dangerous obsession.

    I have a wonderful, funny, loving husband of 25 years, two loving older sisters and their families, plus a lot of dear friends here in my little hometown – and I wouldn’t trade them for anything. Being part of the RA fandom enhances my life, but it doesn’t replace family and friends and the writing I do to earn a livelihood. If our fanship is harming any of those things, then we do need to take a step back and examine ourselves. (And your last line is exactly what I think Richard would – in his own polite way – like to tell people, too).

    We all need our grounded-in-reality relationships, as imperfect as they may be. As william Shatner, better known to many as Captain Kirk from Star Trek, once said on Saturday Night Live in a sketch where he is speaking to obsessed fans at a Trekkie convention: “You people need to get a life!”

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    • I’ve thought about Shatner’s statement recently and all of the negative fallout he got from it. But William Shatner in general seems to be able to bear public disopprobrium with more careless equanimity than Richard Armitage — in short, Shatner doesn’t appear to be very sensitive. Maybe I’m wrong. Captain Kirk was one of my favorite childhood heroes.

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      • Oh, I definitely think our Richard is a much more sensitive soul than dear old William “Ham” Shatner. One of my older sisters and I awaited with bated breath every episode of the original series, so right with you on Kirk being a childhood hero.

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  33. A very good discussion all round, timely and appropriate. RL is good place to be. It helps to have a son who, if one so much as mentions the name Richard Armitage, rolls his eyes and says “So what happened to the grumpy Scot, Mom?” (still have a discreet arms-length attachment to Sir Sean. Who has the vitue of being quite bit older than I am, so slightly less embarassing) :}

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    • I actually try to keep myself real by discussing the blogging I do here with certain trusted people.

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  34. Armitage makes life bearable. When hit by the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, I get RA on the screen and am young again with hope and love for life.

    I’m 70 years old and finally understand why Ulysses had to be tied to the mast when the Sirens sang. Always thought that love thing was just a myth, now I know otherwise.

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    • And Mary Lou, women of all ages from teens to mature ladies seem to hear that Siren song of Mr. Honey Tongue . . . it speaks to something deep within us all.

      He’s therapeutic, he provides catharsis and yes, he makes us feel young and full of life and hopes and dreams again. Having over the past two years lost a parent and an in-law within three months of each other under similar heart-breaking circumstances, faced real concerns over my husband’s place of employment staying open (a car dealership) in the wake of the bail-outs and battling my own health issues and the stresses that come with being a newspaper reporter, indulging in RA therapy has helped me through some difficult times.

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    • This is just a beautiful comment, Mary Lou. Welcome.

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  35. Ah, Sir Sean! Right with you there, @fitzg. He also happens to be one of my husband’s favourite actors, about whom he once made a rather priceless comment: “You know, this may sound sort of – gay – but I think Sean Connery looks better now than he did back in his James Bond days.” I heartily concurred. (I have a very tenuous connection to said grumpy Scot. A former Scottish-born co-worker’s sister once dated him back in his pre-fame and fortune days in Edinburgh)

    And spouse loves to tease me about my affection for RA. But he also gave me an RA key chain, autographed photo and skin for my laptop for Christmas last year (“It’s amazing what sort of Richard Armitage stuff you can find on eBay UK”). Now that’s an understanding hubby.

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    • What a husband. Talk about having an ego the right size.

      I think that Sean Connery is going to become the patron-saint-in-waiting of this blog. I’ve never been a huge fan of his, but given that all you ladies are, maybe I should look more closely! 🙂

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      • He is a keeper, that husband of mine. I’ll tell you what he did for me on or 24th anniversary sometimes . . . ( ;
        Sean as patron-saint-in-waiting . . . I like it.

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  36. For 20 years I have had a recurring dream. In the dream an unidentified man lies sleeping under skins in an igloo. He lies on the floor of the igloo on his left side facing the entrance. I am crawling through the long, cold entrance to the igloo proper. As I enter the igloo and near the sleeping man he lifts the skins covering him; I smell him and feel his heat as I take off my frozen skins and crawl into him — into paradise.

    In February of this year (2010) when the Oregon rain was blowing sideways in the wind, I clicked on North & South in my Netflix account and was finally able to identify the man of my dreams. My first glimpse of Armitage was like coming home. I no longer dream of the igloo man unidentified, for months now it is Armitage who opens up the skins and allows me inside.

    As for those of you who think you would like to see him in person on the stage, it would be as impossible for me as getting too close to the sun. I am not worthy.

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    • I agree with others that you *are* worthy, but I also share this sentiment on some level. I think I’d be fine to see him on stage, but can’t believe that if I ever did see him in person close enough to touch, like at a stage door, I wouldn’t sort of discorporate. I’d certainly become completely speechless.

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      • Yes, servetus, that’s how I would be if I chanced to see him in person. Richard onstage where his facial expressions can’t be so easily seen, hmmm, we’d have just his movements and his voice…oh, man

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        • He’d have to develop a less subtle gestural repertoire, which might be interesting to observe (and compare to his other work).

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          • Yes, he is such a master of subtlety in his screen roles; he’d have to broaden all those gestures and expressions. I would certainly love to see him in action . . . and I do just mean acting on stage, ladies. ( ;

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      • Considering the Queen and Prince Phillip once drove right by me as I stared open-mouthed, a camera in hand, and forget to take their photo, I can only imagine meeting RA face to face might turn me into a complete puddle of quivering goo.

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  37. @Mary Lou, delighted to hear from you on this site! As one who is having to get used to middle-aged! (WHAT?) And whose son is not many years younger than Mr. Armitage, well, perhps I don’t have to feel THAT embarassed by an actor “crush”. In perspective, of course. At least Sir Sean is sufficiently older than I am!

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  38. Oh, wow, Mary Lou . . . that sent tingles down my spine. He is the stuff of which dreams are made.

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  39. @Mary Lou, and angieklong, your husband is is right, Angie. Sir Sean just gets better with age. And I do suspect that Mr. Armitage will, too. Even if he balds. The features and voice and height outlast everything. Do you think?

    No, I’m not obsessed. No more than anyone else on this venue is. 🙂

    The worst of the heat wave here is declining, and there’s a washing-machine calling. How is it, where you are, servetus? Mostly South Europe affected, I think?

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    • Yes, I have pondered the thought of Richard losing his lovely hair and I still think he’d be extremely attractive (unlike, say, Jonas Armstrong, who really wasn’t working that comb-over too well in S3 of RH). Something about Sir Sean’s dark brows and that white beard . . . I prefer him when he doesn’t wear toupees for roles, I really do. As for heat down south, well, our high today is only 92 degrees F, which may not sound very cool, but compared to 100 with a heat index of 111, we’ll take it!

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    • fitzg, it’s just been awful the last five days or so and very litle in the provinces is airconditioned. Yesterday a bunch of high speed trains lost their air conditioning, exposing passengers to temperatures of 50° C, and it’s become a national scandal. Luckily something seems to be passing over us as I write, as I have to go to Berlin tomorrow myself.

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  40. Mary Lou: I’ve no doubt that Richard Armitage is a fine man, but . . . you’re worthy. Please believe me, you’re worthy. Unless you have been engaging in mass murder, you’re worthy of enjoying sitting in an audience watching him. You deserve that.

    If for no other reason, if you and others like us weren’t worthy, audiences wouldn’t fill theaters and RA would be out of work when he tried to perform on stage. He’s just a human, and I suspect he does the things the rest of us do–has horrible breath when he first wakes up, occasionally gets a wedgie, has embarrassing memories, passes gas occasionally, wears ill-fitting clothes (well, there’s no doubt about that), and who knows–with that nose, he just might snore occasionally. He may have at least some of the foibles that we have or that our loved ones have.

    I have a general question: if we elevate RA to near-godhood or the status of adorable megahunk instead of seeing him as an actor, do we do him any favors? I believe that the good Doctor has commented someplace on this blog about a fanfiction she admires greatly . . . but she notes that in it, John Porter’s ability to have a series of strong orgasms in a relatively short amount of time is unrealistic for a man in his late 30s. In reading fanfic I often find myself having niggling thoughts like that, and find myself thinking “It would be pretty depressing for Richard Armitage to read this unless he has an iron-clad security in his own sexual powers or an extremely unusual bunch of male hormones wandering around his body; otherwise he might be thinking ‘If they only knew me! I’m just a bloke, not some sort of sex machine!'” And in general, when we assume that he doesn’t have human foibles–well, that’s fun as a fantasy, but it may propel the actual man into alienation from fans who simply expect too much of him. A common problem for stars and famous athletes, I think, and a heavy burden.

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    • Well said, @another anonymous academic . . .
      While it’s terrific fun creating scenarios with
      RA’s characters in fan fic, we have to remember it’s FICTION, it’s fantasy and Richard would surely be the first one (if I am reading him all correctly, that is) that he’s a normal human being with normal human faults and foibles. He just happens to be an extremely attractive and talented and charismatic human being, but human he is. I agree, he really doesn’t want to be put on a pedestal, bless his humble heart, which is one more reason I am so fond of him. Mary Lou, you are most definitely worthy and I am sorry I didn’t point this out before now. Mea culpa.

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    • You are right, another academic (I too am an academic–retired). I’m embarrassed I put the last paragraph on my dream message. Too many stiff gin and tonic with several gulps of Wild Turkey. He really is different from other actors. I’ve never seen anything like him and at my age I’ve seen them all. Until Armitage I’ve been pretty sane, now I’m obsessed.

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      • Mary Lou,

        Richard can (and does often) make me downright giddy when I haven’t had anything stronger than sweet tea, so who knows what I’d say under the influence?! I totally agree. He IS different from other actors. He’s like catnip and we females are a bunch of catnip-loving felines.

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    • If Mr. Armitage read all the fanfiction written about his characters he’d never work (aside from the fact that much of it, while well intentioned, is extremely poorly edited). I hope he doesn’t read it!

      It does raise the question of what his position is vis-à-vis the audience for all of this Armitage-related “stuff.”

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      • Well, I know I’d blush over him having him read some of my steamier stuff, yet I also like to think he’d find humour in some of my wittier passages . . . but I do agree, a lot of fan fic has good ideas behind it, but it’s poorly executed.
        I would like to get his reaction to some of the really marvelously edited fan videos out there.

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    • I think if he ever reads fanfic for his different characters (yes, some aren’t the best, while others are quite good) he’d be amused at the plots, topics, storylines in general that are developed in them, some authors really understand the characters and that’d be a praise for him as an actor because he was able to make a connection with the audience and transmit the essence of the character.

      I don’t totally agree with “It would be pretty depressing for Richard Armitage to read this unless he has an iron-clad security in his own sexual powers..” because to me that would mean he has a poor opinion of us fans, as if we don’t distinguish between characters and actor or that because one reads JP has more orgasms than an average man, I’d think ‘OMG, he’s a sex machine, I love him even more and want to marry him’. We know it is fiction and fiction about a fictional character, that yes, it our minds has his beautiful face, body and voice 😛 but fictional non the less.
      I think it would apply if we’re talking about real-persona-fiction (is that the term?) where the author writes what he/she thinks goes through RA’s mind and/or writes what he -can or can’t- do.

      OML 🙂

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      • Yes, OML, isn’t that the whole point of fiction, whether fanfic, books, films? Knowing it’s not real , though it resembles reality and enjoying the authors’ fantasy and ability to create? With fanfic, part of the buzz is knowing and having invested in these characters previously in a different context. I’m new to the fanfic world, but some authors have really impressed me with their ability to bring these characters to life!

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        • Smart comment. Fanfic works because of our previous invetment in the characters — hence the heavy emotional reactions it provokes.

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          • Yes, we develop a real interest in these characters, we want to know more about them, their earlier lives, take a peek into their futures (give them futures in the case of Gisborne, who is not, I repeat, not dead) and fan fiction allows us to do all those things. When you have an actor like RA who takes what could be a very one-dimensional role like stoic soldier John Porter or henchman Guy and fleshes it out so beautifully, it excites the imagination and spurs on the creative process. Well, at least it does for me . . . and apparently, quite a few other people.

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      • @OML,

        As a fan fic writer, thank you. I feel better now.

        As I told someone yesterday, fictional characters are often “larger than life” – stronger, faster, wiser, more beautiful, more virile – whether in novels, scripts or fan fic. No actor is going to be quite as wonderful in RL as in the storyline, are they?

        And I do hope Richard would find some of the better-written stuff out there (and yes, I hope he would include some of my writings) imaginative, creative and well done – and a compliment to his amazing ability as an actor.

        I agree, the fic where it’s supposed to be Richard himself and not one of his characters is a horse of a different colour.

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        • Hey, I didn’t mean for YOU to feel criticized, fedoralady. Your fic is great.

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          • Oh, I didn’t think you were criticizing me, Servetus. I just know how some people have a sort of prejudice, if you will, toward fan fic in general, and I felt as a fan fic writer the need to sort of man the barricades. *grin*

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  41. Woah! How many comments on this
    post -58 – an engaging subject then! I’m lucky servetus, that I live near and work in London so a trip to the theatre is no great cost in time or financial terms, and yes I will go (probably more than once) just because I can. But if it ends up in Manchester (say) then it would probably be only once and if it was an overseas trip, then I definitely would not be able to go unless I had an amazing stroke of good fortune. That said, if I was single with no kids etc and it was (say) the equivalent of a trip to Europe from the UK (say Paris) then I’d definitely consider it.

    I see nothing wrong with going to ticketed events, unless you are going every day or something, and I guess that meeting people at the stage door is okay once in a while. I have never done it myself, but I know that my mum used to go to the RSC many many years ago and collected many autographs at the stage door though I don’t think she was a particular fan of one actor. I also am good friends of a couple, now in their 70s who are basically the oldest groupies in town and have always hung around after concerts in places where they are likely to meet their (many) heroes (of music). They have been doing this since they were in their 20s. I’m more disquieted by people deliberately going to TV/movie sets etc on the off chance of seeing someone, and yet if I came across a production filming in the street I would probably stop and watch for a while though I think I would lack the courage to approach anyone, even Mr RA. I think that you have to occasionally examine your behaviour and check yourself that it meets your own (hopefully high) standards. As for stalking or stalkerish behaviour, eg going to people’s private abodes or (say) trying to weedle your way into someone’s personal life in some way, then that it wholly unacceptable.

    Regarding time spent on the Internet, well yes I am guilty of some of that, but I would probably be doing it for some other reason if not this. It also occurs to me that before the Internet and fan sites people must have obsessively spent time and money collecting memorabilia in ways that are now unnecessary. Eg I can get my RA news from several fansites really quickly on a daily basis, but if I had been a (say) Beatles fan in the 60s say then I would have needed to spend time and money locating and buying newspapers and magazines etc in order to gratify myself the same way. I might have spent time and money travelling to and attending record fairs and conventions just to pick up information and ‘stuff’. Maybe I am rationalising but I think that maybe the Internet has just changed the way we do things and what we do, rather than necessarily increasing the amount of time spent on them – of course some people always take things to extremes. This may be a bit of an incoherant post, sorry but the obsessive in me is also watching Homes from Hell at the same time as writing this!!

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  42. @Mary Lou, I don’t know what life you’ve lived. But, with your sensitivy to poetry, worthy just isn’t in the equation. You’re a sweetheart, and I see no reason why any of us – young, middle-aged, etc. should not have a “crush” on a good and attractive actor. Kept, in perspective. And with the proviso, the actor is good enough to be worthy of OUR selective admiration.

    My husband, acquiline-nosed, snores. I fortunately, fall asleep when head hits piloow. So, no problem. @AAA, I’m not a fanfic fan. Fantasies are best kept within my head. In RL, the scenarios to which you allude, are just not required. If a chap is pushing 40, I agree, it is definitely not required that he is a 20-yr-old. Nice to think about, but (even given the differences between male and female sexual development) some things are just more important. (But I do, admittedly, run some of my own fanfic scenrios in my silly mind, but not in print. Just wouldn’t work for me.)

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  43. Many years ago I read a book about Victorian pornography in which the author coined the word–I hope I’m remembering it correctly–“pornutopia,” a situation that happens in pornography in which characters can and do go at it with almost no refractory period between gratifying, earth-shattering sex acts. Yes, a 20 year old is one thing, but even then, there are times when he wants to eat or play videogames, right? Pornutopia is fiction, and I wonder what marvels of physiology somewhat older men like Sean Connery and Harrison Ford are supposed to get up to in the fanfiction about their characters!

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  44. Re older leading men like Sean and Harrison . . .

    Viagra? Lots and lots of Viagra? *giggle*
    (Sorry, in that kind of mood. I think the heat is getting to me.)

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  45. HaHa all over the place! Angie – the “heat” has defintiely got to you. Me too… a washing machine is calling…(I really DON’T want a Toronto power failure here.)

    (Exit laughing, slightly left, of course).

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  46. Truthfully it is cooler here . . . even if it’s still 92 degrees with a heat index of 105. There is the slightest cool breeze.
    One of my gracious older lady friends gave me a wonderfully descriptive term recently for summer in south Alabama:
    “Hotta than the hinges of Hell” (imagine this spoken in a rich, sweet old-fashioned southern accent) . . . makes me long to break out the mint juleps and fan myself on the veranda, dahlin.’ *grin*

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  47. @angieklong, well, 107F, that almost puts 104 “in the shade”. But my pale, Anglo-complexion does not like it much!

    I would travel 300-something miles (not a big deal here), to see Christopher Plummer in a Stratford production. But I have family in the area, and love Stratford (Ontario), so not a stretch. Just great theatre. And a costume hall. With the sketches and costumes of some truly great designers of years past and present.

    How do you make a mint julep? :?, please?

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  48. @fitzg,

    I am a fair-haired (well, OK, it’s prematurely white under the blonde color), blue-eyed lady of Anglo-Irish-Scots descent with a likely touch of Native American, which didn’t pass down to me in any way I can see. As a former co-worker said, “Angie is a white-white woman.” So the hats I wear as fashion accessories on a regular basis also serve a practical purpose. I’d rather not look like a piece of someone’s luggage if I can help it. Daily SPF for me.
    The Stratford productions sound wonderful. Believe it or not, just an hour away we have the Alabama Shakespeare Festival in a beautiful park setting with a great variety of productions (including, of course, the Bard’s work). There are two theatres each with a very intimate feel and really not a bad seat in the house. We treat ourselves to a holiday production pretty much ever year.

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    • This is an idea. Let’s get Mr. Armitage back with the RSC, and then arrange for him to appear in one of those RSC “actors from the London Stage” touring groups that visit the U.S. every year. These are usually groups of three or four actors who play all the roles in a Shakespeare play, and they’re very inventive and tons of fun to watch. I’ve seen several. Then he can work throughout the U.S., we can all see him, and he can have greater exposure to U.S. accents and colloquialisms so that his next sniff in Hollywood is a bit more productive.

      Like

      • I’ve really got to get ready for work, but – YES! This is a brilliant idea! A win-win situation, surely, for actor and fans.

        Like

  49. Ah, yes, the mint julep . . . here’s an easy recipe. Muddle some mint sprigs with a tsp. of sugar and a tsp. of water in a tumbler until the sugar is dissolved. Fill the tumbler with crushed ice and add 3 oz. of bourbon. Give it a good stir and add a mint sprig as garnish. Very refreshin’ on a hot day, y’all. My friend and fellow humane society member holds a Kentucky Derby Party ever year as a fundraiser for the society and she always has some juleps on hand ( ;

    Like

    • …and, of course, the bourbon is Kentucky straight Wild Turkey (101 proof). Nothing else does it for me. Wild Turkey is to regular bourbon as RA is to regular actors.

      Like

  50. I invented a new drink. Meant to call it the Sir Guy because it is so delishiously wicked, but spilled it in the truck yesterday so it is the John Standring.

    John Thornton discusses his cotton supplyiers as the Americans and I realized Emily Gaskill did not see the coming American Civil War which would disrupt John’s and Margaret’s mills six years later. That made me think of Rhett Butler running cotton to England past the Yankee blockades and bringing back munitions and medicine to the bled white Southern States. Then I thought how much better Armitage would be as Rhett Butler than that guy who played him in the ’50s.

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  51. @ Mary Lou,

    Do you have the power to read my mind? ( ; As a southern girl who has seen GWTW innumerable times – OK., it’s not perfect history, but it’s a wonderful movie, nonetheless – I admit to imagining Richard as Rhett Butler, standing at the bottom of that staircase, those azure eyes of his raking over Scarlett as she comes down the stairs, an appreciative and predatory grin crossing his handsome face. (Although I did like Clark Gable quite a lot, he just didn’t have the depth as an actor RA does.)

    Like

    • Remake time!!!

      Like

      • Yet another reason for Richard to make the rounds of the country performing in plays and learning the local lingo and patois . . . I would love to hear him do a southern accent.
        After all, Scarlett was played by a Brit in the 1939 movie (along with Ashley Wilkes); why not a gorgeous, charismatic Brit as Rhett? (didn’t Timothy Dalton play him in that not-so-great sequel?)

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  52. @fitzg,

    I appear to be losing my mind, I could have sworn you replied to the post about mint juleps and asked if gin could be substituted, but I can’t find it now. The answer is “yes,” I don’t see why not.
    Actually my everyday drink of choice is a tall glass of iced tea, sweetened with sugar and topped with a slice of lemon . . . also known affectionately as the “house wine of the South.” (;

    Like

    • putting gin into a “mint julep” would change the character of the drink. You would have something other than a mint julep.

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      • @ marylou,

        True, it would be a mint something or other else, but it would be worth trying if you can’t abide whisky, I suppose.

        Like

    • iced tea, self-sweetened (not sweet tea)=the thing I miss most about the U.S. when I am not there.

      Like

      • I will drink tea with artificial sweetener when I have no other choice, but I admit I prefer it the way I grew up drinking it – tea bags steeped for a while in water brought to a boil, then poured in a pitcher, sugar added and stirred, then the pitcher filled with water and more stirring. My nephew used to tell my mother she needed to set up a “sweet tea stand” by the side of the road. ( ;
        I really don’t need the calories the sugar adds, but there’s just something about it . . .

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        • Texans love it too, though there is always a choice between “sweet” and “unsweet”, as it’s called. I don’t like the supersweet taste. If I had a choice between lemon or sugar it would always be lemon.

          Like

          • We always offer people sweet and unsweet tea in our local eateries. Some places do almost turn you into a diabetic with one glass. I like mine to be moderately sweet.

            Like

  53. Interesting comments about the RA fan thing, and whether acting colleagues might wonder exactly if the audience has any interest in them. But I must say I’ve watched N&S, Robin Hood, and Spooks with appreciation of so many of the other actors. Even RH had its non-Gisborne moments.

    @angiklong, thank you for the recipe!

    Like

    • I also agree. I watched those shows because of Richard but some of his cast mates hold their own in the show and surely they have his group of fans too (with different degrees of enthusiasm compared to us), only we might not be aware of them.
      In Spooks I really like Ros and Harry, both HN and PF are great actors and I’m certain PF has a lot of fans.
      Joe Amstrong is great as Allan, one of my favourite characters of RH, of course I think Allan was as his best with Guy, not only because he was becoming a kind of friend to him but with their scenes and plots, it had to be ‘divided’ only between Guy and Allan, while when he was in the gang, the plot with Robin&Co. had to be ‘divided’ between more people, thus giving him less ‘space’.

      OML 🙂 (Sorry, I went off topic)

      Like

      • As you know OML, I have a soft spot in my heart for Joe as Allan, and always thought he could have been the friend Guy so desperately needed. He and Richard were great scene partners and indeed, Team Leather was so much fun to watch. I will sorely miss Hermione from Spooks. She and RA made a terrific team in S8 . . . Lots of good actors in these shows, absolutely.

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  54. @fitzg,

    You’re welcome1 As mary lou pointed it, it wouldn’t technically be a mint julep anymore with gin, but what’s life without a little experimentation?

    And yes, there are many fine actors out there who have appeared alongside Richard in the above-mentioned productions and others whose work I also enjoy and appreciate. Even though a lot of RH script-wise was rubbishy, there were still some good performances beyond Richard’s. I loved his chemistry onscreen with Lucy, Joe and Keith, in particular.
    (The less I say about Jonas Armstrong as Robin, the better. I don’t want to offend anyone who is deeply attached to him in that role . . .)

    Like

    • I think you and I are on the same page about Armstrong. Although it’s not the done thing to criticize him, I guess.

      Like

      • I realize I have been rather merciless toward JA as Robin in some of my fan fics, but it’s my way of exacting a certain sweet revenge. I found some of his snarky remarks on the DVD commentaries, along with Lucy Griffiths’ general lack of enthusiasm for him in her interviews ( while crowing happily about what a great scene partner RA was) to be very telling. Richard, of course, would never say a bad word against him. But I am not as nice as Richard.

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  55. And how could I forget the deliciously over-the-top fop, Prince John, as played by Toby Stephens? Oh, that adorable boy . . .

    Like

  56. I’m helping my son apply for a year abroad in Germany, and it’s got me remembering being a student abroad spending a week in London in December, seeing one friend who was around. Somebody correct me if I’m wrong, but it seemed like the sun went down at 3 and came up around 7:30–at any rate, there seemed to be few daylight hours. (It’s even colder and darker up North, if a trip to Gaskell’s stompin’ grounds in Manchester or Knutsford is planned.) It was cold and wet, and though I’d made plans to do things and see things I found it pretty depressing to be almost alone in a huge city and come home to a hotel room alone. I’m not a good traveler on my own, but I certainly enjoyed being in England more during the spring and summer, when there’s sunshine at 10 pm (I think. It’s been a while) and it rains less! If like me you’re not a good traveler on your own the hours outside of the theater might be kind of glum and lonely.

    Like

    • Yes, the nights are long even in London in the winter (and long in the summer). There are plenty of things to do in the evening, but they are all more fun with friends.

      I just got to Berlin. It’s almost 11 and I can still see vestiges of the sun.

      Like

      • I loved the really long summer days in England when we were there. I remember Benny and I and our students walking through Kensington, visiting the palace gardens there, through Notting Hill . . . we had a lovely jaunt together. I would not love it getting dark so early, however. And yes, I would think it would all be more fun with a friend or two.

        Like

  57. […] and look what happens in the comments! I come back sunburned AND edified, that’s what. As a few of those commentators wrote, the level of discourse in the comments is a really energizing thing […]

    Like

  58. Anybody else think of Lincoln when looking at Armitage? RA is 6’2′ where Lincoln was 6’4″. RA is dark as was Honest Abe. Both men have/had deep-set, expressive eyes. RA can be gangly when he wants (the way Sir Guy runs sometimes is expecially endearing). RA’s humbleness and goodness shine through even in as violent a character as Sir Guy and those traits make me think of Lincoln’s compassion. Two problems: one Lincoln was not handsome and two Lincoln’s voice is said to have been high and nasal. Could makeup make RA look like Lincoln’s photos? No living person has heard Lincoln speak and how many folks know anything about it, or care. So, Armitage would have to pick up some American Kentucky accents — really not too hard for an Englishman as those Kentuckians have a bit of the Mother Country in their speach even yet. Anyway I would love to see Richard play Abraham.

    One play might be based on Benet’s 1920’s epic poem, “John Brown’s Body.” I hear Armitage reading the poem in a voice over while the action of the American Civil War takes place on screen. In addition to the voice, Arimtate would play all the (tall) lead males (not Grant): John Brown; Lincoln; fictional soldiers Clay Wingate (Confederate) and Jack Ellyat (Union). I have memorized many parts of the poem. It won a Pulitzer back when that prize meant a lot.

    I would like to hear what you ladies think of my idea of RA playing Lincoln.

    Like

    • I`d have said the accent would be the biggest issue, and maybe Mr. Armitage could give Abe a Kentucky accent. The southern or almost southern accents are easier for the Brits because they don’t have to fight as much with the troublesome “r”. But the height and the occasional clumsiness definitely fit, as does the high forehead.

      Would Americans accept a Brit playing the railsplitter?

      Like

      • …and the nose. Yes, Americans would accept Armitage playing Lincoln. Most Americans never even heard of England. Our Education system sucks. Actually, many Americans never heard of Lincoln.

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        • Mary Lou, I got a good laugh out of your post but also a twinge of sadness because there’s a lot of truth there. I suspect more Americans know who the Kardashians and Spencer Pratt and Heidi Montag are than who Lincoln was. *sigh*

          Like

          • angie, I never heard of the kardashians nor pratt/montag. just goes to show how divided America is. Before the Civil War, history tells us, it was this bad, I hope we don’t have another one, but I’m thinking all this hatred will lead to it.
            Thinking of Armitage playing all parts and reading the John Brown’s Body: Armitage plays the confederate soldier, Clay Wingate of Black Horse Troop fame charging into the Yankees screaming tag ends of Latin. I would then play Wingate’s mom: “Mary Lou Wingate as slightly made and as hard to break as a rapier blade. Let us look at her now, let us see her plain for she will never be like this again. Her house is shaking under the blast; she feels it tremble and still stands fast but this is the last. The last of the wine and the white corn meal, the last high fiddle singing the reel, the last of the silk with the Paris lable, the last blood thoroughbred safe in the stable. The door will swing on a broken bolt, the thoroughbred give birth to a jackass colt. The waiting for news with shut, hard fists, the strange, blurred names in the battle lists.” I can just hear RA’s wonderful voice reading that and Benet’s idea of what was lost in the Civil War “…the running stag, the gull at wing, the pure elixir, the American thing.” teary sighs booohooo

            Like

            • I am liking this idea more and more, Mary Lou. I really see it as a project RA would find interesting and challenging. The Civil War was such a sad and bloody chapter in our history. Of course, I have to confess I know a few older folk who still refer to it as the War of Northern Aggression . . .

              Trust me, you are not missing anything by not knowing who the above-mentioned people are. Suffice it to say they all rose to fame appearing on reality TV shows, which I have never watched and never will if I can possibly avoid it. But they constantly pop up in the media and are considered celebrities in spite of the fact they have no discernible talents, unless appearing in a homemade sex tape enduring a “golden shower” from your then-boyfriend is now considered a talent. La Montag is so desperate for attention she had about a dozen surgical procedures, including inflating her breasts to ludicrous proportions. She used to be a cute, fresh-faced girl. Now she is just one more plastic-looking, expressionless Hollywood bimbo . . .

              Thank goodness Richard doesn’t gad about with one of those on his arm. I’d lose respect for him.

              So, now we need to somehow put a few bugs in those lovely elfin ears of his about some new projects . . .

              Like

              • The imdb folks have an ongoing thread of stuff they’d like Mr. Armitage to be in. If we all had our way he’d never rest.

                Like

            • This all fits well with the series of roles that Mr. Armitage has had that stress lost identities. I’m going to have to check out the piece.

              Like

      • I believe if memory serves me correctly Kenneth Branagh played FDR a few years back. So why not Richard as our 16th president?

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  59. @Mary Lou,

    I suddenly awoke to the sound of my darling husband’s not-so-darling snore (well, I’ve been sleeping like crap lately anyway) so I decided to check my e-mail and saw your post about RA as Honest Abe. Now that is an interesting idea.
    He can be gangly as he himself has said; squint at him just right and you can see a bit of Sam Waterson, who has played Lincoln before to critical acclaim. I think with the right makeup combined with RA’s amazing talent to inhabit a character, yes, indeed, he could pull off said American icon.

    Also, Lincoln was a man who endured a lot of disappointment and hardships in his life and I think must have experienced plenty of angst, and who better than Mr. A to pull that off? (And you’re so right. His goodness and humbleness do shine through even in the characters we’re supposed to boo-hiss, like my dearly beloved Sir Guy)

    I have noticed in general American southern accents seem easier for Brits to pull off than, say, New York or even the “accentless” mid-Atlantic ones.
    Some of my older friends here in south Alabama have that wonderfully rich patois with hints of the Mother Country, too, so I reckon it would work. Aas you say, no one knows for sure what he sounded like or really cares.

    When William Randolph Hearst, a big man with a ridiculously high-pitched reedy voice was portrayed in the film “The Cat’s Meow,” Edward Hermann captured the mogul well and with his own deep, resonant voice.

    I am going to have to go back and re-read the Benet poem. It’s been a long time . . . yes, possibilities. I definitely see them.
    Of course, I am of the totally unbiased opinion Mr. Armitage can do just about anything and pull it off. But then, the man is made of magic.

    Like

  60. I have the perfect setting for a Colonial America movie and think if RA’s agent/producer/whatever happened to drive up the lane and ask if they could make an RA movie here. Wow, I would be overjoyed. We have just under 100 acres of trees, a lot of old growth, huge old trees, an old stage coach road, 100 year-old apple orchard, and a new house with a 10’used brick fireplace with bake oven on the right side. We have Highland cattle and two miles of riverfront. We are surrounded by timber companies for miles. There is lots of wildlife: cougars/mountain lions/ bears/elk (of course, the wildlife would high-tail it if a movie production company moved in. What fun that would be. I imagine RA and my son driving into the nearby towns and RA showing Nathan how to act around girls. Nathan is a shy cowboy – reminds me of John Standring – and could use RA’s talents as a lady killer. Daydreaming.

    Like

    • Yeah, if the acting thing ever doesn’t work out for him, he could give classes on how to drive women wild. A sort of “how to make friends and influence people” for the new century.

      Like

  61. @ Mary Lou,

    Your property sounds lovely, not to mention a perfect location for a period shoot. I am a country girl so it automatically appeals to me anyway, but what a treat it would be to have a certain handsome actor of amazing talents on location there.

    As it would be your property they were using, I am sure they would let you watch behind the scenes, which, having watched a movie being done in my hometown, is very interesting (well, we don’t get a lot of such opportunities around here; some of you out there may have had quite enough of that). And I think RA would make a delightful older buddy for your young son. Ah, Sweetie John, what a darling! What a shame Carol never realised what she had in him . . . *sigh*

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  62. Sir Guy was correct in supporting Prince John as King of England. Richard the lion heart could not speak English (was a Frenchie), stepped foot in England once (to pick up tax money), and was a flaming homosexual. John (altough also a Norman) spent most of his time in England and sired truckloads of kids both legit and illegit. Every time I see robin and his gay men extoling the virtues of richard, I get sick.

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  63. […] that involves you, which is all I’d ever be able to permit myself to have in real life. Yeah, I’d go see you perform in a theater; I’d even fly transatlantically to do that, and despite the objections of critics, not think that was crazy, and confine it to the aesthetic […]

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  64. […] that the potential for such an experience is a reason that, despite my convoluted reservations, the theatrical fantasy exercises such amazing force in my life: Richard Armitage has talked about the potential flow […]

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  65. […] is the height of bizarre and it was extremely disturbing. It’s the unversion of the theatrical fantasy. Judi assures me she’d never do this, and I can’t imagine Richard Armitage would, […]

    Like

  66. […] Up till now, while I’ve discussed my desire to see Richard Armitage on stage, I’ve wrestled with my discomfort about the whole stage door / meet and greet situation […]

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  67. […] and a few images of Armitage with fans visiting the set surfaced during that period, although I’ve been told that fans at the time debated vociferously whether it was acceptable to plan to…. Fan meetings and pictures with Armitage continued to remain an isolated pleasure in proportion to […]

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  68. […] That I’d fantasized about being able to see him act in the theater. […]

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  69. […] Interview is here. […]

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  70. […] draw together matters that have preoccupied me really since the beginning of Armitagemania, as I was wondering as soon as there was even a whiff of a play on the horizon what I would do. (I explored it further, and we talked about it more, here.) Two things strike me upon revisiting […]

    Like

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