Alternative careers

A good friend and I’ve been eating dinner a lot together lately (her partner works during the dinner hour), perhaps because we’re sublimating dread about my imminent departure. We’ve been brainstorming possible future careers for me. She suggested I could maybe make a living writing “that guy” blogs. I’d need to pick actors who were on their way up, so there was enough stuff about them to cap, discuss, and analyze, but who needed a sort of place for their potential fans to flock and squee. I’d contact their agents and offer to blog about them regularly in return for a regular information stream and a small payment. She thought I could maybe blog about eight or ten of these guys and that would be enough to live on.

It’s a funny idea, but actually, I’m not going to do that. “Me + Richard Armitage” is a proudly non-profit venture. Mr. Armitage does the work and gets paid for it. Servetus blogs about Mr. Armitage and gets the therapeutic benefit. Actually, I should probably send him the amount that I was paying to my therapist last year — $140 / hour. Could run into money. Eventually, he could probably afford to act only in poorly paid experimental gigs in obscure theatres where no fan had ever gone before. Oh, wait, to keep paying that amount I’d have to keep working. Darn. Was hoping I could support him just with my therapy dollars.

Anyway, if I were going to write “that guy” blogs, there are two people I’d start off with right away. One is a favorite of many North & South viewers, and also of Dear Friend, who’s just been watching him in Lark Rise to Candleford with all kinds of delight: Brendan Coyle. He seems to have garnered one fan site, but no more than that. And yet what an amazing combination of acting talent, rough attractiveness, and apparent general loveability there. The London Evening Standard describes him as an “unlikely crush object” and compares his role of Mr. Bates in Downtown Abbey to that of Mr. Thornton in North & South. I love Coyle, too, and he’s only five years older than me!

The second “that guy” I stumbled across again tonight, while watching an ITV historical drama, The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher (a show with lots of people we know from Armitage watching: William Beck (RH), Tim Pigott-Smith (N&S), the actor who played Professor Kirby in Spooks 9.3. It’s the adorable Ben Crompton, who played the role of Inspector Mason in North & South. How could we forget that quirky face? He’s got a minor role here, as the unfortunate who discovers the body.

Ben Crompton in The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher.

Crompton is the same age as my brother, so definitely within range! Here’s another picture for good measure, from the BBC:

I want to reassure you I am not leaving Mr. Armitage behind. I was writing the last couple days on another post on fantasy. It should be finished tomorrow, but it got long and too convoluted. I need to sleep on it one more time. [ETA: Meanwhile, read Calexora’s John Porter Fantasies post.] I’ll leave you with a cap I made recently that made me think again about what an unusual and entrancing jaw shape Mr. Armitage has:

Richard Armitage’s jaw seen from the left rear, in the fake wedding video scene “It should have been me” from “A Handsome Stranger” (Vicar of Dibley) with Armitage as Harry Kennedy, Dawn French as Geraldine Granger, Keeley Hawes as Rosie Kennedy, and Nicholas Blane as the singing vicar. My cap.

And here’s another one of those pretty blue-ray screencaps, from Robin Hood 1.13:

Oh, the nobility in that face!: Guy of Gisborne (Richard Armitage) looks up at the priest during his abortive wedding to Marian (Lucy Griffiths). My cap. Enlarge at your emotional peril.

So if I’m not considering “that guy” blogging as a career, and have no plans to monetize this blog, what am I thinking about? Here are some options, in no particular order: poet, speech therapist, public defender, hospice clergyperson, ESL teacher, policy analyst / government researcher, free-lance writer, registered nurse, academic librarian, professional Girl Scout. Human being.

[Mark: first third of final grading done and out of the way. Next wave: Saturday.]

~ by Servetus on May 11, 2011.

45 Responses to “Alternative careers”

  1. Ooooh, oooh, ooooh, academic librarian, and you can still write “that guy” blogs. Are you familiar with Meg Wood. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

  2. Free-lance writer!!! Imagine, you could write from anywhere in the world!

    As for Ben Crompton, he could be the twin of a former colleague. Kinda throws me off with that (also because said colleague was always trying to put the moves on me and the attraction was not mutual). But I did see lots of potential in Ben – he ‘popped’ out in N&S. And I love Brendan of course. Now, he definitely fits ‘teddy bear’ description.

    I still prefer by far Mr. A. There is no replacing Mr. A. *contented sigh*

    Like

  3. *sigh* he’s just an unusually entrancing fellow, period. I adore his profile. Noble and beautiful and very masculine. If the man doesn’t have the blood of kings flowing through his veins, he certainly should have.

    Brendan Coyle reminds me of a big, cuddly teddy bear. Very appealing. And Crompton does have a likeable quirkiness–a face with character.

    Armitage Therapy is a great thing. A lot cheaper than analysis and you get to look at such pretty pictures and hear such a delicious voice. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    That’s an interesting array of potential careers you have. But I think you’ve already got the human being one down pretty well. ๐Ÿ˜€

    Like

  4. Be an academic librarian AND a freelance writer! You could still use your teaching skills, but you do need to write. Definitely keep your blog. And how about fiction writing? You are doing a terrific job of the fan fic short stories. Poetry? Why not? But keep your day job! LOL

    Like

  5. Academic librarian sounds good, or perhaps an archivist! Speaking of monetization, I have no plans to do that either (except for maybe Amazon affiliate links) but I do have a coffee donation button ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • It’s interesting to me how many people pick academic librarian. I know you are not *all* librarians.

      Like

  6. With your talents, Servetus, I think you could do almost anything but I can’t really see you leaving teaching – at least not for any length of time. I think it is in your blood. I do hope you find time to write though as you have already proved you can do that brilliantly!

    I too am enjoying watching “Lark Rise to Candleford” and Brendan plays such a lovable and loving character in it. I have also been watching, “South Riding” on PBS. Has anyone else been doing so? I’m loving it!!

    I took four hours out of my day this afternoon and watched N&S yet again!! This time I watched it on my computer and I don’t know if it was the close proximity of the screen or what but JT had an even more overwhelming effect on me than he usually does. Oh my goodness! Did he ever!!!!!!!!!! I don’t think I have ever felt my emotions engaged in such a way before. Not sure if my heart has recovered yet as he actually made it ache at times. It was almost as if I was watching it for the first time when in truth I have lost count of how many times i have done so. His acting was quite breathtaking.

    Like

    • There’s something weird about watching N&S on a computer screen that makes Mr. Thornton’s face the same size as one’s own. I’ll admit that a few months ago I did that on purpose, sizing him so he was the same size as me, and then putting my own face next to the screen …

      Like

      • After being a part of Armitagemania all this time it still amazes me the things he makes us do, servetus! I would feel foolish even thinking of doing it to/with anyone else but seem powerless to stop myself where he is concerned!! We might even find ourselves smooching a bearded DWARF in the coming couple of years! Who would have thought it!! ๐Ÿ˜€

        Like

        • I feel like this is a challenge to computer makers to improve their screens. I mean, why smooch a bearded dwarf if you can’t feel the bristles on your face?

          Beard-o-vision? Can it be far off?

          Like

          • “Beard-o-vision” servetus!! That sure cracked me up!! Personally “stubble-o-vision” would satisfy me but I believe you have a penchant for beards! To tell the truth I’m a bit concerned as to how I will act when we finally see him in Digital 3D!! I may have to be tied into to my seat in the theatre as I don’t think I can be responsible for my actions when the 3D effect brings him so near!! If not so restrained I may disgrace myself by straining forward in an attempt to touch him ๐Ÿ˜‰ That is if I manage to stay conscious when confronted with all that gorgeousness in such close proximity!! I may also have to be gagged to stop me from yelling THORIN!! or perhaps RICHARD!! or maybe I’ll just be moaning! The gag may also help to control any excessive drooling ๐Ÿ˜€

            Like

            • I know I’m going to squee soooo loud and long people will want to throw me out of the cinema. And of course, no one will understand why I’m squeeing. He is not known in these parts and with a beard and all? They won’t get it.

              Like

      • Been there done that sista ๐Ÿ˜‰ ! In fact, I’ll do it right now!! ….awww…we look good together. Mainly because I’m not standing next to him and therefore it doesn’t show that I’m a foot shorter… ๐Ÿ˜€

        Like

  7. Of your careers, you will easily detect what my favourite would be for you to do. You as English teacher, what a dream! High class conversation training especially for history students worldwide, I could very well imagine that there should be enough demand, at least for a second income. A combination of history teaching and ESL, yes, I very much would have liked that during my university time. Hourly basis and preset hour availability with discussions via Skype or something like it.
    But I am very interested, that whatever you chose that it should leave you lots of time to continue with your blog and writing in general!!! Perhaps you could also start a career as a history teacher for authors? Recheck their often quite faulty historical background and bring in some real story? You could even hold seminars and do tours. โ€“ Oh yes, I know, my fantasy got the better of me, but I would find lots of things for you to do which I would like to attend.
    I keep my fingers crossed for whatever you chose or get a chance to do!

    Like

    • ESL teacher is a very portable career — which is why it’s appealing. I’d love to lead historic tours, actually.

      Like

      • If you need an online tool for offering those kind of tours, you could have a look at the last part of my e-mail address (I just do not want to openly write it down here and force you to advertise it). It leads to the German site, an English version is available there as well. If you are interested, I can try to help with advertising. I also have a friend in the tourist business and can try to get you in contact with her. Perhaps she can advice how best to procede with such a step.

        Like

  8. At the moment, I am addicted to Lark Rise to Candleford. I can’t stop watching it. It is just so well written and yes Brendan Coyle does grow on a girl! He has a way of worming himself into your heart. What I partticularly love about it, it that they tackle modern themes in a period piece setting.

    BTW I vote for hospice clergyperson or just clergyperson.

    Like

  9. Librarian! (not that I’m biased). Depending on the career direction/environment, that can incorporate considerable seguing into research, analysis and writing, and of course teaching. Speech therapy could be intriguing. Translator: could you translate books from German?

    Pity about dismissing blog-for-fee. Benedict Cumberbatch…
    Ben Compton is adorable. But too short for me… ๐Ÿ™‚

    Agree, Lark Rise is lovely. Cozy, with highly defined characters. S. Riding very promising. Has anyone watch Doc Martin?

    Like

    • Doc Martin is hilarious and Martin Clunes plays the part to the hilt!! The word “curmudgeon” only hints at his character and I love his total lack of tack or bedside manner:) He seems the total opposite in RL! Nice to see some well known faces in S. Riding too. I think Anna Maxwell Martin plays her part brilliantly.

      Like

      • I should also have mentioned Peter Firth of course! He’ll always be “Harry” to me I think! His hair-piece looks a little bit incongruous there – so un-Harry-ish!

        Like

      • That should be “tact” not “tack” of course!! I shouldn’t be in such a rush to hit the Post Comment button!!

        Like

    • I should have put translator on the list. I’ve published about a dozen academic translations. It’s not especially well paid, though. I thought briefly about going to interpreter school — that would be interesting, and I could work for the U.N. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Like

  10. I’m a recent RA fan and I love your blog!

    What about teaching at a community college? Librarian jobs are really tough to get.

    Or poet! This fall, I will be attending a state school for an MFA in poetry with full funding for 3 years with a livable stipend for teaching 1 composition course per term. I’m terrified of teaching but will muster the courage to get through it.

    There are many funded MFA programs in fiction and nonfiction as well – here is an invaluable resource – the webpage is currently offline but it is cached here – here

    Like

    • vialbc, thanks for the comment and welcome! Thanks also for the list of resources!

      I taught at a community college during my first year post-Ph.D. Actually, I taught English comp during that period. Tiring. It’s really hard work. On the other hand, one of the classes I taught there was my hands-down best experience in the classroom ever.

      Like

  11. All kidding aside, what a loss to the teaching profession if you choose not to teach again, and certainly, you should be writing for money! Whatever you do, it should allow you to exercise your gift of encouragement. There is only one issue that has to be dealt with of which you’re probably already aware. Encouragers need more encouragement than most others. But oh, it’s worth the agony of living with that gift for what it produces in others, and what a wonderful benefit to students in particular.

    Sadly, most of the really fine teachers I had either never knew it or knew it long after I was a student and they were teachers. That kind of delayed gratification is almost a physical pain to an encourager. So my prayer for you is that you can be built up in places you’re not expecting. Certainly, this blog is one of those, but dare I say (after having been married to an encourager for almost 28 years) that even this not enough.

    Like

    • Do you ever get it, Frenz. The problems you identify are serious issues for me in continuing to teach.

      Like

  12. I should recommend becoming “academic librarian” as that’s what I’ ve been doing for the past 20 years (and by and large that’s what I love to do after all those years). However, after following your blog for almost a year I think you’re made for teaching. Perhaps some “timeout” will help you to realize that…? Anyway – whatever you choose to follow as a career eventually, I hope and pray that you will be happy.
    Love Suse

    Like

    • I never thought I had a librarian personality; I have very little capacity for organization. I like research tools for what they yield, not as things in themselves, and most of the successful librarians I know are interested in the structure of knowledge in ways that I am not.

      Thanks for the good wishes.

      Like

  13. I can’t recommend any future career paths, because I’m not sure on the following: do you have your interests outlined? Do you have a pretty clear idea what appeals to you and what definitely is a deal-breaker? What are your desires career-wise and in what area? What are the values that you treasure most that need to be met?

    Can you give a good and sound reason as to why you’d want to do … when asked?

    I’ve only recently gone through that all, figuring things out. What do I really want? Who am I? What is a passion of mine and can I do something with it? What truly matters? And finally, how do I get there?

    Like

    • No, to most of those questions, and the answer changes based on the time of day. I really hope that this summer I can sit entirely still and do some values clarification. For me the “how to get there” problem is always much less tricky than knowing what I want, but I’m starting to see that those two questions are related in ways that I had not realized earlier.

      Like

      • Oh yes, the last question is the easiest, but you definitely run the risk the final destination may not be what you want. Perhaps not even close.

        I’ve noticed that I was quite easily thrown off a track, simply because I had no real clear idea what I wanted. I had a general, vague concept, but that didn’t get me anywhere.

        The journey does become a bit easier when you’ve figured out a lot of the important stuff. I hope you get the chance to do so this summer! ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

  14. no alternatives. only richard

    Like

  15. Academic librarianship has no appeal to me either. Special Librarianship has far more flexibility. It’s satisfying to kick a roomful of disorganised material into usable retrieval shape. After that, if you are fortunate, budget runs to hiring a library assistant to do the “housekeeping”, while the librarian is free to explore the more creative opportunities for research, analysis, and even preliminary report writing for clients. And to think up new services, based on client need.

    Like

  16. Yeah, I probably should have specified that the kind of librarian position that would interest me makes the job just as hard to get as professor: rare books / historic collections.

    Like

  17. As long as it leaves the opportunities for intense research, analysis, writing, and client/colleague inter-action – it’s good!

    Yes, the current financial environment provides fewer positions of this nature. Realistically, there is be a bean-counter mentality that considers libraries as equivalent to horses eating their heads off. But, the right place at the right time…it happens.

    Like

  18. […] teach school — and the ongoing question of what I should do next — if I am going to retrain, I probably should do it in Texas, the state of which I am resident, because of the huge tuition […]

    Like

  19. […] joked about “that guy” blogging as a career in the past. Fabo profiles a guy who would definitely be on my list of actors to approach: David […]

    Like

  20. […] tasks that are components of this job, like teaching, about which I remain unbelievably ambivalent. I’ve listed some alternative careers but I can’t love any of them, either. And the question of what to do next is just so […]

    Like

  21. […] upon a time I noted that if I were trying to make a living writing “that guy” blogs, Brendan Coyle might have bee… of people I would approach. I also offered to date him, but no response from Mr. Coyle so […]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

 
%d bloggers like this: