Armitage as vampire?

A much slower day here today, the first day everyone was home together; we’re all still feeling each other out about how this arrangement is going to work and where our personal boundaries are, and of course, as I keep saying to my parents, the first ten days are supposed to be vacation!

To that end (relaxation) I’m reading A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness. To some extent because it’s supposed to be the great summer blockbuster, to some extent because she spoke on my former campus in the spring, to some extent because she’s a history professor and there’s a lot of chat about how to communicate about history with broader audiences or whether this sort of thing is one thing that history professors can / should do, to some extent because I wonder whether what I should do is write novels.

Well, what I shouldn’t do is write novels like this one. I mean, there’s nothing wrong with it, but I fear it’s what happens when a history professor writes a historical novel about a history professor. The main character, Diana Bishop, is a history professor doing research at Oxford and also the reluctant heir to the magical heritage of a long line of very powerful witches. Part of me is happy to read, finally, a novel where a manuscript-consulting protagonist is drawn by someone who’s used scholarly and rare book and manuscript libraries and knows the procedure for how things go in them and something about the qualities and construction of old books. Harkness makes Diana excited about old books in themselves both as objects and as receptacles of arcane content, and that’s pleasurable for me as a fellow lover of ancient texts and objects. But on the whole, the novel isn’t that great. The plot is clunky; backstory gets inserted “just in time” in order to make the plot make sense; she picks and chooses arbitrarily about which pieces of vampire lore she’ll accept and which she’ll ignore; and perhaps, worst of all, the protagonist is very clearly a Mary Sue. You get the feeling that this book is intended as the first entry in a Harry Potter series for adults, but it offers nothing near the sophistication or artistry of those works. The prose is competent, workmanlike, and clear — not unlike the writing style we teach our graduate students to emulate — but never magical or captivating. Frankly, one expects more for $28.95, even in our degraded age.

[At right: Robert Pattinson as Edward Cullen. Yawn.]

BUT. There’s one thing that’s really entrancing about this novel, and it’s something that surprised me: the depiction of the male protagonist who is (I yawned when this emerged as a plot element) a vampire.

Now, Servetus is not interested in vampires. She forced herself to read the first two Twilight novels and see the first film out of a feeling that she needed to try to stay au courant with the popular culture her students were consuming. She was horrified by the possibility that what teenage girls these days desperately want is simply to wait around in various states of ecstasy, tension, or boredom until they get bitten by difficult guys who aren’t all that into them for the first several hundred pages. She found Edward Pattinson bland and uninteresting and was much more interested in both Jacob Black and Taylor Lautner. But she’s never read any Anne Rice, beyond her erotica (make of that what you will), and can’t remember ever having been interested in any other novelistic depictions of vampires or having seen any other vampire films. She’s even mentioned that Armitage as a vampire would challenge even her rather latitudinarian views on what he should be doing with his career (summary: whatever he wants).

Armitage as vampire: first kill? Actually, Lucas North (Richard Armitage) reels, blood-spattered, from Marlin’s suicide in Spooks 7.3. Source: Richard Armitage Central Gallery

Despite my lack of interest in vampires and vampire literature, Harkness’s vampire, Matthew Clairmont, is really seductive, and I found myself repeatedly reading Clairmont as if Richard Armitage were playing him. It made me think of Anne Rice’s statements that she would be interested in having Richard Armitage play Louis or Lestat (or, which I didn’t realize at the time: Jesus. I had thoughts like that early on that bugged me a bit). One interesting thing about vampires in Harkness’s novel is that their glance causes witches to become cold, so that every time Matthew looks at Diana, she has the feeling of snowflakes falling on her. These photos of Lucas that make him simultaneous appear angelic and frozen fit really well with that image, like this publicity still:

Richard Armitage as Lucas North in series 7 of Spooks. Promo photo drawn from events of episode 3. Source: RichardArmitageNet.com

He’s so finely drawn and pristine, so pale of cast, and he puts together his lips and blinks his eyes so gently, in an almost otherworldly fashion. You think you could almost look through his skin and see his cold veins pulsing.

But I think the main thing I got from Harkness’s book was the vampire as the creature of desire. Matthew wants Diana very, very badly. This fits in to some extent with Skully‘s theory about one reason for our love of Armitage, his ability to portray desire. I want to add to that slightly, with respect to the vampire theme, because it seems to me that one thing that unites the few vampires I’m familiar with (in this case, both Edward Cullen and Matthew Clairmont) that goes beyond their desire is their conflict over their desire. The “modern vampire” (which Angie has John Porter make fun of in an amusing chapter of “Truce”) has ethics and doesn’t give in to his desire to feed on human blood every time it occurs to him, and this ability to show us desire under control is an important trick in Armitage’s oeuvre as well.

Mr. Thornton (Lucas North) encounters Margaret (Daniela Denby-Ashe) at the Thorntons’ dinner party in episode 2 of North & South. Source: Richard Armitage Central Gallery

It’s that capacity of his to say “I want you so very much, and I am holding back with every fibre of my being except my eyes” in his acting that fits so well with these modern vampires. Armitage has even expressed himself as finding this task not so difficult: “you look at the person, think of them in the most desirable way you can and then suppress the desire to do anything about it. There are many ways to smoulder. You can smoulder with your back.” But I think the point is not solely the fact of the desire, but rather the way that Armitage as actor puts the desire in the context of the role. He’s not simply panting for love — in every role where desire is an element, it gets a slightly different read from him and a slightly different series of boundaries that make it unrealizable.

Guy of Gisborne (Richard Armitage), who’s always simultaneously driven and humiliated by his desire for Marian, after she agrees, reluctantly, to attend the fair with him in Robin Hood 1.5. Source: RichardArmitageNet.com

So maybe I can live with Armitage as vampire, should that eventuality ever eventuate. Perhaps I should send Deborah Harkness — who has a poll on her website about who should play Matthew if there’s ever a film of this book — some Armitage DVDs. Anonymously, of course, since that would break my basic rule about being willing to go wherever Armitage goes in his career, role-wise.

[ETA: Here’s @Rob’s post on the topic at the Richard Armitage Fan Blog. Sorry I forgot this, @Rob. Here’s Maria Grazia’s post on the topic at her blog; I’m sure I didn’t read this because I automatically discounted the vampire theme. My apologies, MG.]

~ by Servetus on June 26, 2011.

66 Responses to “Armitage as vampire?”

  1. Actually, Servetus, I have often thought Richard would make one gorgeous, tempting, complex vamp. Far, far more interesting to me than dear old Edward Cullen, who has never done a thing for me, frankly (I would feel slightly pervy if he did, given his age LOL)

    I am not heavily into vampire novels and films (unlike a co-worker who adores all the Twilight stuff and has read every Anita Blake vampire book she can get her hands on), but I did love the series of books True Blood is based on –a lot of humor and heart in them, actually– and I actually like the “bad boy” vampire, Eric, far more than I do the good guy vampire, Bill. Shades of RH! And I used to be such a nice girl . . .

    There is something otherworldly about RA at times in his roles–I have said he seems magical, not bound to this earth. If the eventuality does arise, yes, I think he could rock the whole vampire thing very, very well.

    (I have actually co-written a story about Guy as a vampire pirate–a while back)

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  2. I had this Armitage-vampire matter in my hands few months ago while reading Syrie James’s romance “Nocturne”. I’ve never, never , liked vampires but … she said her Michael Tyler was Richard Armitage in her mind http://bit.ly/gmw2Ns. So I had his familiar features in mind while reading Nocturne. I didn’t like everything in that book , but it might work! http://bit.ly/gUi3JQ I mean, Richard would be perfect in that role, if he ever accepted a script taken from a modern romance (Syrie James worked in the movies as a writer before starting writing novels) . He would be perfect cast. As for me, I’ve just seen a Twilight movie to check what all the fuss about it was (my students!) and no other vampire movie or series but … I’m ready – just like you – to give Mr Armitage vampire – or whatever else he chooses to be – a chance.

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  3. I have to say I have absolutely no desire to see RA play a vampire. Not only do gothic novels do nothing for me, I also think the genre is so over exposed at the moment that it would be a bad move for him.

    It is also why I’m glad he was cast as a bad guy in Captain America because superheros are seldom really liked and these roles can scuppa a career.

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  4. Good point about superheroes . . . sometimes it can be difficult for the actors to move on to other roles. Sometimes the villains are much more interesting than the bland good guys, anyway.

    Oh, I don’t think he is going to run out and pursue a vampire role as I agree, it is an overexposed genre right now. But I do think he could do a dandy job of it if he is ever so inclined in the future. Of course, I tend to think he could pull off almost anything. 😉

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  5. I can see Richard playing Jesus. S3 Guy sometimes looked like Jesus as painted by El Greco.

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    • I can see the lighter side of Jesus being painted by El Greco. Laughing my head off at 2:00 a.m. Thanks

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  6. Superheroes are boring. Vampires aren’t much better. Themes and popular culture are areas to which I have to apply with a more open mind. Not fond of blood, though in RL, no problem patching up others. My cut finger – my blood – ready to faint. Shudder to think what Skully might read of that – please don’t be too hard on me, Skully.

    Richard Armitage as an el Greco figure? Absolutely. The face. The body.

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    • @fitzg,

      Re blood, I am a bit the opposite. My own blood does not seem to alarm me particularly–don’t mind having it drawn and I was once literally covered in it due to head wounds after a car accident–but the sight of other’s blood makes me queasy. I chalk that up to having to, at the tender age of 6 or 7, mop up the trail of blood my older sister left after cutting her hand on a Pyrex dish while washing up. She nicked an artery (Ny mother was away at a meeting and my poor father kept saying, “Sara. Don’t faint. Mama is not here yet. Don’t faint!” Bless his heart.

      @Rob,

      Yes, I remember that discussion. I think I may have to read this book just for such an RA-shaped character (although I won’t pay $28.95 for it–is it on Kindle, I wonder? Or I could visit my former co-worker at the library where he is now head honcho . . .)

      @Cindy

      I think the man could make his left big toe smoulder if so inclined. I mean–he IS just a bit magical. Aren’t we glad we all discovered this? 😀

      @Nietszche

      I agree absolutely. I thought the same thing about Guy in some of those scenes from S3. Especially a couple in the dungeon cell. The lighting . . .

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  7. I also read A Discovery of Witches earlier this year and can’t say I absolutely loved it, although it wasn’t the worst thing I have ever read. However, I did find it difficult NOT to picture RA as Matthew. The author’s description matched so closely and RA does seem to have an otherworldly aura about him at times.

    “You can smoulder with your back”??? This guy never ceases to amaze me.

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  8. When I read this book and had the very same reaction. I think Ms Angie and I had this discussion off line. It is my fantasy to see him play a vamp and I guessed blogged about it for Nat awhile back ago and then the Anne Rice quote popped up a few days later, so we are all on the same page.

    Discovery is a fun summer read, I couldn’t put it down and I wont spoil it for you, but there will def be follow up novels.

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  9. I actually like some vampire stories, I think I read Dracula by Bram Stoker at an impressionable age and I always compare all vampires with Dracula. I remember Frank Langella (a very handsome man at one time, though not bad now either!) as a very seductive vampire in a movie that didn’t stand the test of time. Oddly enough I don’t like True Blood, and I haven’t read or seen Twilight (I think I’m too old-LOL). But I did love Aidan Turner at Mitchell in Being Human.

    I haven’t read the Harkness book, but very long ago read Anne Rice’s Interview With The Vampire (only one I’ve read), and unfortunately did see the movie with Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt. I agree with Anne Rice that RA would be a perfect Lestat.

    Having said all that, I join with those that think RA would make a marvelous vampire. He has the look of course, but he has the ability to be so very seductive on screen, and to me that’s essential to the Vampire/Dracula story. As the audience you have to be both frightened and totally attracted by this creature. I’m sure he would also be entirely believable in the role, something difficult to do if you’re playing a vampire. But it would have to be a vampire film worthy of Richard’s talent, a good script and not just a film with much blood and gore and CGI.

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    • @Musa,

      I fondly remember the Dracula film with Langella. He was beautiful and in a distinctive, non-cookie cutter sort of way back in the day. I had rather a crush on him. Saw the movie again recently and have to agree, it hasn’t held up well.

      I do remember Langella’s Dracula as being very seductive and agree, Richard’s ablility to seduce us on screen (I can easily imagine him having the power to “glamour” his victims) would translate into a very powerful performance.
      Certainly, it would need to be a good story and not just CGI running rampant.

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  10. I also read the Syrie James book at the same time as Discovery of Witches (sometimes I read three or four books at the same time). I could also see RA as Michael, although I would probably say Discovery of Witches was a more serious, deeper read than Nocturne (although I am praying for a sequel to Nocturne and those who have read it already will understand why).

    Musa, I could see Discovery of Witches being a vampire film worthy of RA. There was a whole discussion on Deborah Harkness FB about “dream” actors for roles in a possible movie. RA not mentioned, although I was tempted!

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    • @Cindy

      Too bad RA was not mentioned in the discussion, I could see why you would be tempted to mention him 🙂 Now with all of you having read “Discover of Witches” I might be tempted to read it…or add it to my list.

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  11. I think that I would not like to see Armitage as the vampire. However from second side, knowing his talent I know that he would be excellent. And I’d watching him like a hypnotized.
    Beyond this, I do not understand this today’s enchantment vampires. I will admit that I watched “Twilight” because I wanted to understand „the phenomenon of Pattinson” but sorry, not understand it. To tell the truth I prefer to watch “Being Human” with an amazing Aiden Turner as a vampire.

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    • I forgot to mention Aidan as Mitchell! Really love Being Human. So glad Aidan is playing one of the dwarfs in Thorin’s band.

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      • Oh yes, Aidan as Mitchell, I forgot this to write, too 😉
        BTW, for me, it was joyful news that Aidan joined the crews in TH. And I can’t wait to see them together on screen (especially the singing dwarfs) 🙂

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  12. Don’t like vampires per se’…don’t even want to look into vids/clips on TV of Tom Cruise/Brad Pitt vampire film….but if RA will be into it, I’ll reconsider but close my eyes on the goriness of the film.

    My Twilight experience (don’t know anything about it)….son came home with a DVD six months after the film was released. Ask me if I want to see the film with them. Asked about the genre, “he said about vampires”. Quickly said no, thank you.” After a while, heard beautiful piano playing tune and saw old beautiful big trees (old forest in Portland). Sat down for a while to finish the scenes and stood up again when the vampire things are happening. The music was “Bella’s lullaby’ by a well known composer in the film industry.

    I appreciated more the young man who played Edward…Rob because of his infectious sense of humor, self deprecating style and unfiltered at times but could be intelligent when asked with intelligent questions. He seems to be a nice young man, a wide reader apparently. I can see where his fans are coming from that he became a phenomenon in a short time.

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  13. I think he’ll do an excellent vampire, although I’m not really interest in him playing one (nor James Bond… *hides from tomatoes thrown at her*) I would watch it.

    I did like the Twilight books and the first movie, actually read the books because of the movie, the next 2 movies not so much, the third even bored me… When Twilight had just opened I had been exposed to Armitage (N&S), I wasn’t yet a ‘fan’, one day I was on my computer and decided to read what was Twilight about before going to watch it and saw the actors the pics and quickly moved on to surf a RA web page, after looking at 2 pics of him I thought ‘really, I must watch Robin Hood, I want to see more of him’ (I had been delaying watching it, because the RH legend never really interest me, I always cheered for the good guy and I knew he was the baddie), ironic how Sir Guy ended up being my fav character played by RA.

    OML 🙂

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  14. Im not for or against a vampire role as such. I would say that, given the opportunity, it depends on the script, characterisation, story etc. I think that if these were sufficiently strong for him to agree to take on a vampire role, then it would definitely be worth watching, as I trust him to make good choices.

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  15. I’m not for or against a vampire role as such. I would say that, given the opportunity, it depends on the script, characterisation, story etc. I think that if these were sufficiently strong for him to agree to take on a vampire role, then it would definitely be worth watching, as I trust him to make good choices.

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  16. I think every generation has its vampire. The Anne Rice’s books, “Interview with vampire and “The vampire Lestat” were in my school bag (an impressionable age), so as Bram Stoker’s Dracula. At the time I liked films Dracula, with Gary Oldman and The Hunger, with David Bowie, in part by the opening scene with the Bauhaus, and his song “Bela Lugosi’s Dead”. I never liked the super-heroes, as well as the villains, pure and simple. I sympathize with the anti-heroes, no accepted, the homeless, and the dreamers. The heroes who fall into the darkness of their souls and go in search of own light. Maybe that’s why I like the characters Armitage, where I find the duality of self, the conflict of human desire and the complexity of the soul. And I think this is largely a result of his interpretation, than the fruit of the scripts. I watched and read some things related to the current issue (Twilight, Vampire Diaries, and True Blood). These distracting the head after a day of work, but do not feed the soul. Richard Armitage could do that.

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  17. I find that “publicity still” of Lucas almost breathtaking. I find him extremely beautiful there and when I’m able to enlarge it as you have done for us here Servetus I can gaze at those eyelashes with the blond roots and those eyebrows which definitely contain more than a few fair ones so you can see that neither dark brown or black is his natural colour. He sure is one stunning guy!!

    I’m not into vampire movies per se, so it’s not something I necessarily want to see him portray but I know I’d be compelled to go see it just because it was him! You all know what I mean 🙂 I would however NOT want him to ever take take the role of Jesus, as I believe I have said before. We don’t know what He looked like and I don’t think we are meant to. I hope I don’t offend anyone by quoting this here, but check out Isaiah 53:2 (NIV) where it says “He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him, nothing in his appearance that we should desire him.” That doesn’t work for me when it comes to Richard Armitage. I feel just the opposite in fact, as he is both beautiful AND desirable – so I hope you will understand my reticence even though you may not agree with me.

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  18. From the midnight depths of the Tansylvanian psyche, to Bram Stoker, the vampire image lurks in all imaginations. A ghostly reminder of the dark side of the soul. Which we choose to confront in our own ways. Or not.

    Mr. Armitage has proved the ability to portray those dualities. Which is the essence of art – the power to move the audience or viewer or reader.

    A salute to the upcoming August birthday, the achievements, the dedication, and to the the road to come. The journey is worth all. The journey is life; and endless creativity.

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  19. Would this be a good place to mention that my historical squee dude wrote one of the first modern vampire legends in English? And that “Lord of the Dead” is about him?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fragment_of_a_Novel

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  20. I love this post. Richard is quite the seducer and looks good in puffy shirts and head-to-toe black so I can see him in this role.

    I was a fan of Robert Pattinson from Harry Potter 4 and agree with Tedgirl that he does have a certain self-deprecating charm which I found appealing. I had an ambivalent experience with Twilight—it seemed utterly ridiculous and yet I was drawn in to the cheesy romance of it all.

    Teenage love between a girl and a vampire was wonderfully portrayed in Buffy the Vampire Slayer, a TV series with a beautiful feminist message. The most compelling vampire character in BtVS was not Angel, the vampire love interest of teenage Buffy, but Spike, an English vampire who redeemed himself through his love for Buffy as a young woman.

    I haven’t seen True Blood yet but am considering it.

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  21. I did not read “Interview with A Vampire”, but started with the Lestat point of view in “The Vampire Lestat” and loved all books following his story line. I lost the line of Anne Rice a bit, when all protagonists got their own stories and gave up reading her latest books. (I don’t know her erotic books, but my sister read them and interpreted her vampire books entirely different than I did because of it. So I never tried them, as “Vampire Lestat” together with the music I heard while reading, “Innuendo” by Queen, was the most influential aspect of my late teens.)
    But I think, RA would be an ideal Lestat, fighting for identity, finding his way as a vampire, finding a way to cope with good and evil in his form as vampire. I think RA is the necessary highly talented and able actor to picture such a heavily broken and self-doubting figure as Lestat is.
    But I think perception of the vampire is too much mingled with the filming of the “Interview with a Vampire” with Tom Cruise, though I even thought he did a great job back then. But I never liked the outer perspective on Lestat and much more enjoyed his critical view on the world and what is wrong in it and in its perception of heaven and hell.
    In general I think, there are better roles for RA, where he can create his own multitude of interpretations and is not so much held down by other’s perception and regulations as well as previous interpretations.
    I keep my fingers crossed that the ideal role he wishes for will come up for him.

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  22. Dear Servetus,
    My first post here, but I’m a regular lurker! I read “A discovery of witches” several months ago, and simply could not stop picturing RA as the vampire. It made me enjoy the book more than I would have without the image.

    A perfect role for our hero might be as Nicholas Brisbane in Deanna Raybourn’s Lady Julia Gray series, the first volume of which is “Silent in the grave” — a light hearted read with good humor and a delicious male love interest. Check it out!

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    • Welcome birdgirl! I recently bought “Silent in the Grave” along with another three of Deanna’s books! I have just started to read Georgette Heyer’s “The Grand Sophy” but now you have me torn between it and your suggestion!! I think I just might have to read about this “delicious male love interest”!! And who could be more delicious than RA?? 🙂

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      • Teuchter,

        Put aside Georgette for a while and enjoy the delights of Nicholas and Lady Julia. You won’t be disappointed, I assure you. 😀

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        • I bow to your greater wisdom Angieklong!! I now have 4 new GH books and the 4 Deanna Raybourn ones waiting to be read! I REALLY have to stop buying all these books – at least for a while – as I’m running out of space to put them!

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    • @ Birdgirl,

      Great minds think alike! I have been preaching the gospel of RA playing Nicholas Brisbane ever since I read the first book. I’ve read the first three and just got the fifth in the series. Have to read it and the fourth. I think Lady Julia is a fantastic heroine and RA would make an absolutely terrific Nicholas. I can envision him writhing in torment in the midst of one of those terrible migraines and playing the violin so beautifully all the ladies melt–and a certain kiss. Oh,yessssssss . . .

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      • A dream come true would be a BBC production of this series, with our RA as Brisbane. Who would be Julia?
        Anyway, I just received my copy of book 5 and I’m saving it for vacation. Enjoy….

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        • Oh yes I’m be totally glued to the screen and hogging the remote for that.
          Heck I’d even find some reason to get my men folk out of the house so I could enjoy it in peace.

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  23. I was sorely tempted to mention about RA to Deborah Hartkness as a contender for playing Clairmont.

    He’d give him the subtlety and depth he needs and won’t be afraid of the darker corners of the character.

    I adore this book with a passion. It’s definitely a book to add to my Kindle in the future. ( I tried it first from the library. )

    It’s an awesomely crafted tale in general and the sub plot about the enigma that is Matthew Clairmont is mind blowing.

    I was picking the book up at every available moment to read a bit more.

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  24. Finally got round to reading this! It’s interesting that you raise the Armitage as vampire idea, I can’t remember where but one RA blog posed the question – which role would you like to see RA play? My answer, in addition to a role in a Western, was Count Dracula. I don’t have any particular interest in Vampire stories, but RA seemed to me like a natural fit for such a part. The publicity still you put in this post made me realise that his physical features probably influenced my answer more than I realised.

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  25. […] (Earlier this summer I conceded that I was still vampire-unfriendly but had found a vampire that I co….) LD_AddCustomAttr("AdOpt", "1"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Origin", "other"); LD_AddCustomAttr("theme_bg", "161410"); LD_AddCustomAttr("theme_text", "999999"); LD_AddCustomAttr("theme_link", "d8d7d3"); LD_AddCustomAttr("theme_border", "35302A"); LD_AddCustomAttr("theme_url", "BD934F"); LD_AddCustomAttr("LangId", "1"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Autotag", "books"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "career"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "fans"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "heterosexual-dystopias"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "heterosexual-utopias"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "me"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "richard-armitage"); LD_AddCustomAttr("Tag", "silliness"); LD_AddSlot("LD_ROS_300-WEB"); LD_GetBids(); Share this:DiggFacebookTwitter […]

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  26. […] Michael Tyle, escrito por Syrie James, em Nocturne. Esses temas foram brilhantemente discutidos em Armitage as vampire? escrito por Servetus e em Nocturne: I’ve Read it, Liked It and This is why: Richard Armitage! […]

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  27. […] or Michael Tyle, written by Syrie James, in Nocturne. These themes were brilliantly discusse Armitage as vampire?  written by Servetus and Nocturne: I’ve Read it, Liked It and This is why: Richard […]

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  28. […] as a candidate to play Matthew Clairmont. I put this here only as news, not as an endorsement (you already know how I feel). The reason I’ve been behind the Richard III group is because Armitage has said repeatedly […]

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  29. I’m beginning to get fascinated by this and I haven’t even read either available book. I guess I’ll crack open the first. The idea of Richard as a vampire makes my blood boil.

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    • Thanks for the comment, and welcome. Blood boil in a good way or a bad way? 🙂

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      • As in “I am already in a constant simmer over his flame”. Does that answer it? 😉

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        • aha, ok. Well you should join up with the “Richard Armitage for Matthew Clairmont” folks, then 🙂 You could simmer with them 🙂

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          • I do. I have. And you were linked – http://crystalchandlyre.tumblr.com/post/50398703892

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            • aha. Didn’t realize. It’s often hard for me to tell where exactly links are coming from when they come from tumblr. Thanks retroactively for the link.

              That’s a wagon I’m not really on. “me + richard armitage” doesn’t have a position on projects that Armitage hasn’t explicitly stated he wants to do. Personally I’m not thrilled as I don’t like vampire stories that much but of course, if he wants to do it, I want him to do it.

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              • No actual endorsement here either, as I haven’t read any of Ms. Harkness books, but I do love good vampire lore. I just figure if a good (or great) part is out there waiting to be had – and the property is hot like this one – then I too want it, IF he wants it. Current Vampire lore = HUGE romantic leading man opportunity. And Richard’s history of “fictional” temperament, natural grace, gravitas, along with his entire visage, just fits the bill very, very well.

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                • well – and, and it’s a big “and” — if it’s a good script, if the movie is well made. I really don’t need him to be in Twilight. It could be good for his career but I don’t want to suffer through that. It wouldn’t be a dealbreaker but it might be hard for me, if his career really went in that direction.

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                  • Let’s hope this sort of thing wouldn’t be the least bit like Twilight…in any way, except for it’s success and a secured audience (such as The Hobbit). Money making potential is at least some consideration, I’m sure. Have to be somewhat realistic. And the female protagonist is supposed to be an educator/researcher and…well..a practicing Witch. (As I write, it sounds a bit cheesy already, huh?) But the characters are at the very least are adults – with Clairmont being a bit “seasoned” by years (as many Vampires are). Factors that would probably be the biggest in consideration, industry-wise (as I feel he very much now has every right to own) are the attachments – Director, other Leads, especially the Lead actress. I really hope he is able to assert such discrimination in his career – not that he has made any bad career decisions, as of late. Again, all of that, in addition to the best damned script, I would assume might play strongly in any decisions made. Being the smart and savvy fella that Richard is, I just couldn’t see him doing anything less. But only he knows who or what he would say Yes to without question – if at all anymore.

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                    • well, I said above that I didn’t much care for the book and why, so you know my prejudices :). I’m sure Armitage will decide well — he has up till now, any way.

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  30. Well, I got through the first two chapters of A Discovery of Witches and I had to stop. Although she describes Clairmont pretty much AS Richard – with the exception of “dark” eyes – I do not otherwise think well of what I have read so far. As you said it here, Servetus: “there’s nothing wrong with it, but I fear it’s what happens when a history professor writes a historical novel about a history professor.”

    Harkness bogs it down with her passion as a historian – making it her protagonists passion, but yet never succeeding in having it become ours. I could feel that I was being “schooled”, not being shared with the love of information, books, and witch lore.

    And, well, I didn’t care about our female protagonist, Ms. Bishop, even a little bit.

    Although I still like the idea of a Richard as Vampire, this one – as is – won’t cut it for me. A further distraction/detraction – petty as it might be. Bishop states at one point that there is a fragrance of “cloves” about him. Honestly. Like a Club Goth. Really?!

    I read further in regards to the plot line from another reviewer. [SPOILER] Although “chaste”, but true and deep intimacy could be nice – a tease – if done well…but I just can’t see it. Or maybe I just don’t want to. She might be making a point about the nature of (or struggle toward) real and true intimacy, but I really can’t bear to read further in order to gain it. And like you mentioned, Servetus, I have already read two books similar – of which seemed more about shallow, and painful desire in chaste intimacy.

    So, I too pass on A Discovery of Witches. There is better out there.

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    • I agree. When he said recently “fans will be so happy if it works out” I thought, just don’t make it Discovery of Witches. Make it Richard III or the Guersey Potato Peel society … but of course, if he plays Matthew Clairmont, I’ll definitely see it. (I also kind of think his next role should *not* be a fantasy creature.)

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      • Shamefully, if he played a dancing Christmas Tree I’d go see him…desperately hoping that he had a damn good reason to play a dancing Christmas Tree.

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        • Ah, but rest assured, ladies, he would be the most elegant, graceful, glorious and desirable dancing Christmas Tree the world has ever known. And suddenly, like prison tattoos and guyliner and hairy old dwarves in burlap sacks—Dancing Christmas Trees would become sexy to us, too.

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          • or at least extremely attractive. I don’t know about all those needles 🙂

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            • Aw, if you can overcome beard burn, you can manage that, Serv.

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              • I have sex-under-the-Christmas-tree while drunk PTSD 🙂

                Of course, it’s true that it’s not sex-with-the-Christmas-tree while drunk PTSD … maybe it would be okay.

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                • Hey, that makes ALL the difference in the world, don’tcha think? You would be willing to try it . . . come on. 😉

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                  • OK, IF Richard Armitage takes on a role as a dancing Christmas tree and IF Richard Armitage proposes having sex with me while dressed as a dancing Christmas tree — I promise to consider it very seriously.

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  31. […] already on record as thinking that the material in A Discovery of Witches is quite thin, even for what it is — although theoretically, again, scriptwriters could improve it substantially. (In comparison […]

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  32. You already know that I LOVE ADOW and SON. I normally am not into books like these. Vampire and witches really hold no interest for me. I never read the Twilight books or Anne Rice’s books and still have no intentions on doing so. I only read ADOW because it was highly recommended to me by ARmitage4Clairmont, so I had to read it to see what they were all so excited about.

    I absolutely adore this trilogy, so it comes as no surprise that I do not find it thin material at all. I so look forward to the third and final book. This trilogy has so much in it that I love. It had me spending considerable time online looking up the locations and the books that were referenced in them. I loved the spiritual elements. Alchemy is something that has always fascinated me. I loved that the main male and female characters are scholars. I love the focus on great wine, history, love, romance, etc.

    Matthew Clairmont initially creeped me out, but as I kept reading I fell in love with the character. I just read ADOW for the second time and loved it even more than the first time. It has become one of my favorite books. I could go on and on about all the things I love about this trilogy.

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    • Yeah, I know a lot of people like it. (Obviously, it’s a huge bestseller.) It’s just not very interesting to me. (See above post) 🙂 I read it way before the whole fan initiative thing, as I said, because it’s a history prof writing a novel (something that’s occurred to me as something I could do) and on some level, the description of Clairmont sort of suggests Armitage. I remain by my hope that it’s not something he wants to do, but my reaction to the work precedes the fan interest in it. I have no issue with the fans who want it (or any other role) for him. I’ve only promoted roles for him that he was quoted as saying he wanted. If he ever does that w/r/t Clairmont, I’ll promote it as well.

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  33. […] my reaction to Star Trek: Into Darkness before the discussion got so heated. (It also applies to my reaction to Armitage playing Matthew Clairmont, if that should happen, despite my lack of interest in that role for him, and to the possibility […]

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  34. […] one falls decidedly in the genre of a television show I never wanted to find myself watching, and role types that leave me cold. Never say never, though. This will be a challenge, but I guess we’ll see what happens when I […]

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  35. […] I don’t know if these choices have been accidental or purposeful with regard to avoiding misogyny. I tend to think that, although Armitage’s female co-stars have repeatedly praised his work and cooperation and support, that this pattern is more an accident than a plan. At the same time, it certainly makes sense for an actor whose fans are still primarily female not to choose a role that is blatantly sexist or misogynist. I don’t have the knowledge to parse out which factors are important for Armitage, although I wonder if the fact that Dolarhyde is more mainstream in term of the social stereotypes that constitute how we build a villian in our culture is a sign that he is loosing himself successfully from the presupposition that an Armitage fan is necessarily or incredibly likely to be a woman. And this isn’t a dealbreaker for me — I realized long ago that I would be likely to go almost anywhere with Richard Armitage in terms of roles, although I wasn’t excited about vampires. (I think snuff films were on my list of absolute noes, though.) […]

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  36. […] on A Discovery of Witches, which is now airing in the U.S. Here’s a link to my long-ago consideration of the book and the possibility of Armitage as Clairmont. Harkness saw The Crucible, and Armitage followed […]

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