Armitage anatomy: epicranius or occipitofrontalis?

This muscle is sometimes called epicranius, sometimes occipitofrontalis.

John Porter reacts to the reappearance of Tshuma’s men in Strike Back 1.4. Edited version of a cap at RichardArmitageNet.com

Ricky Deeming (Richard Armitage) being interrogated in George Gently: Gently Go Man. Source for original cap: RichardArmitageNet.com.

~ by Servetus on October 19, 2011.

24 Responses to “Armitage anatomy: epicranius or occipitofrontalis?”

  1. I’m so glad you included an explanation of what the occipitofrontalis muscle is and does. I often joke with my children that I need some botox on the left-hand side of my forehead as I’ve made a couple of wrinkles there from raising my left eyebrow too often in surprise! Actually, the lines have appeared in the past year or so only and aren’t even very deep – not too bad seeing I’ll be 65 in 3 weeks’ time! Luckily, I’ve never been a frowner – in fact, I’m not even sure which muscles to engage for that. And, no, I wouldn’t ever have botox injections anyway.

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    • I feel like this is his most obvious facial feature — a sort of signature piece of the architecture of his face — and it’s there because he obviously uses it a lot. After reading about what it does I did wonder if he was subject to frequent headache, though.

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  2. Thanks Servetus!
    You’ve provided one more reason to sculpt Richard Armitage in marble–his noble brow and forehead. Sighhhhh!
    Cheers! Grati ;->

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    • Goodness Gratiana! I think if someone ever did sculpt him in marble there would be queues round the block to view it, especially if it was a David-like one! Lol!! “Blushes”!!

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    • had Michelangelo only had Armitage at his disposal.

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  3. I’m loving this Servetus! It’s like being back in nursing college again and what a perfect model to work on!! He does have rather beautiful facial muscles, doesn’t he? Just another couple of muscles to drool over! 😉 And his occipitofrontalis does give him those lovely raised eyebrows, whether one of both, and those endearing horizontal wrinkles! Mmmmm.

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  4. Mmmm, Mr. Porter, you are so beautiful…Look at the fascicles of his Deltoides. Speaking of fascicles – did you notice his right Masseter? there’s a very prominent fascicle between his jaw and his cheekbone, that will drive me crazy one day :-D.

    I really love your anatomic analyses, Servetus! 🙂

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  5. Mmmmmm, The Armitage Encyclopaedia of Anatomy…guaranteed best seller! 😉

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  6. I bet those muscles also show when he’s having sex 🙂

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  7. […] here’s a followup on the pronounced motion of occipitofrontalis / epicranius, the most easily visible muscle in Armitage’s face, which is so pronounced here that we can see it in […]

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  8. […] mentioned recently that I had asked myself why Armitage has such a well-developed frontalis. I had wondered whether it was due to genetics or if other factors were involved. Examining this […]

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  9. […] a.m. — Shooting. Careful to make sure that he is always filmed from the right side, where frontalis is not so disruptive and the superficial temporal vein is not so pronounced either. Wouldn’t […]

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  10. […] performance is unrecognizable. There’s plenty of familiar Armitage to see from the prominent occipitofrontalis to his tendency to gaze in way that makes him seem both engaged with his interlocutor (in this […]

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  11. Richard’s interest on Primordial Gravitational Force is intriguing…that is my man,even without his smashing talents/looks.

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  12. Phrenology is out of style…talent and intelligence are nature and nurture…we cannot build an android to replicate him…he is as rare as Koh-i-Noor Diamond.

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  13. […] [Read more about Richard Armitage's occipitofrontalis here] […]

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  14. […] clichéd) piece. I loved the way the lighting caused the light to hit and reflect the contours of Richard Armitage’s frontalis — which emphasizes the amount of emotional energy the character is investing in balancing all […]

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  15. […] see it again in the theater, but I’m glad I did make the time to see his sensitive face (and those big forehead muscles!) on the huge screen. Swoon. Fairytale king, take me […]

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  16. […] something and trying to look earnest. I wrote posts about his forehead muscles: frontalis, epicranius. Armitage himself must be aware of it, because he commented on it in the infamous Tanya Gold […]

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