Still grading, but trying to be hopeful

This is disjointed, but given the long, distressing, phone call I just had with the father of one of my students, seems worth putting down.

Yesterday was a day without joy except that provided by Armitage-viewing. It was really clear yesterday exactly how a certain kind of stimulus goes to a certain part of my brain that facilitates certain things, and what happens when that doesn’t happen.

So today I decided to start intentionally by looking at a picture that makes me happy. The picture can be found here. Yeah, as I’ve noted before, he’s sort of incompetently dressed, but the picture makes me happy. Everyone needs friends; whether it’s more or ever was, it’s good that he has a good one. So then, I was wondering what was up with Ms. Capper. I only look from time to time, so for people who are more organizedly interested than I am, this is old news, no doubt. I knew that she’d been in a production around Christmas, “Double Indignity,” playing Madame Détruire (Mrs. Destroy):

I’m not familiar with the story and I didn’t see any reviews of Ms. Capper’s performance, but I love the concept of a theater that you can go to just at lunch. If you just need a little fairy-tale to make your life more bearable. This campus could really use that.

Then I discovered, looking today, that she’s just recently been in a production of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” as Nurse Ratched. She gets a brief, positive mention here. I’m glad it went well. May you get all the fulfilling work you desire, and go from strength to strength in it, Ms. Capper!

But the reason that I’m mentioning this today in this particular context was that I was interested in the blog that the mention came on. It’s called A Younger Theatre, and it’s written all by theater-lovers under the age of 26! Its authors are just the age of my students. What a fantastic idea! It’s really true that most theater critics in the major outlets are quite a bit older — and I hope that a younger set of eyes brings younger energy, and younger audiences, and theater prices appropriate to younger incomes, to all of the stages this publication looks at.

On days like today, when all the messages I get are about how we have failed to see, failed to teach, failed to help, our younger fellow humans, reading a publication like this blog gives me hope that young(er) people will indeed believe in their power to change the world, grasp it, and work toward making the world they want to see. The energy that crackles from this website is inspiring. I try hard to inspire my students, and I want to say thanks, A Younger Theatre, for inspiring me back today.

~ by Servetus on April 17, 2012.

21 Responses to “Still grading, but trying to be hopeful”

  1. Hello Servetus 🙂
    This will be completely of topic, but I think that you have mentioned on some occasion that you will help if somebody would like to see what is hiding in DF world. So, could you please please, pretty please send me the password?
    Aurum
    p.s. you ARE mining (I hope that I have used the good word), but you are mining for gold ..

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  2. Thanks, Servetus, for bringing to my attention this small theatric gem of Lunchbox Theatre! This is YET another example of what makes working in the City of London such a rich and rewarding experience… there’s always so much going on and the fact that it’s so walkable always mildly shocks me.

    I’m often @ Paternoster Square for lunch and this place is just another 15 min walk away… there’s even a Chilango on Fleet Street so my co-workers and I can grab a burrito for lunchbox theatre! http://www.chilango.co.uk/

    I’m back in LA today, leaving in a few hours for London again.

    See you on the flip side. 🙂

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    • hmmm — maybe you can catch a production some time 🙂

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      • Already in the queue, Sistah’ (see comment below)! 😉

        I (and a few co-workers) try to rotate between theatre, ballet (or modern dance), orchestra / symphony, museum exhibits, and musicals.

        I became mildly disgruntled when I noticed one of my co-workers uses it as a sort of impromptu ‘nap time’ (he even napped during Frankenstein!!) so unless they draw shades and turn down lights, I think this may be a first for him in terms of staying awake during an entire theatrical production! 🙂

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        • sounds like he’s not getting enough sleep.

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          • It’s true! He has chronic sleeping problems and sometimes doesn’t make it through an entire night, I’m told. So I guess I should be okay with him catching a nap @ these events? I’ve considered getting some sort of neck-brace for him, just to at least keep his neck stabilized while he’s napping in the various venues. 😉

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            • it might be kind 🙂

              seriously, I’m starting to think that chronic insufficient sleep was one of my biggest problems in my last job. It’s amazing how much healthier one feels when one is not constantly sleep deprived.

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              • Getting sleep is always one of my new year’s resolutions. As far as staying healthy it’s right up there with eating right and getting plenty of exercise. It’s amazing to me that we’re to spend so much of our life time sleeping.

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                • I’ve also added ‘drink plenty of water’ to the mix. You’d think that that’s so basic anyone could do it. But things generally go awry as soon as I forget it.

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      • Servetus, I had quite a few of my Chicago co-workers here in London this past week and all were very excited to catch one of these lunchtime plays. Sadly, it appears the next run of plays won’t be until May 22. Everyone was very disappointed. 😦

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  3. It seems tons of people are googling asparagus right now?

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  4. It is a great concept. Go to the theatre for lunch, and back at work within the hour. It would certainly make for a more interesting day at the office.

    It would appear that AC is consistently working and my understanding is that theatre work can be challenging to come by so she may be very well respected in the field.

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    • I agree, Gracie, it’s in the middle of the day and is not a huge time investment.

      I have a co-worker who, regardless of event or venue, will immediately fall asleep as soon as the lights go down. We recently saw something at Sadler’s Wells with music composed by the Pet Shop Boys, so I thought for sure he would be able to stay awake with such loud dance music playing. Alas, no joy. 😦

      But this little theatre may do the trick! 🙂

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    • She’s been in some very respected stuff, but her CV suggests that she also really likes experimental things.

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  5. I’m always hopeful when I see young folks getting involved and achieving. Actually, I feel a sense of relief.

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    • My favorite radio station when I lived in Seattle was always KNHC, owned by the Seattle Public School System, and run by the students of the high school (Nathan Hale High School). They were very early adaptors of some pretty high energy dance music.

      I suppose, as a result, I have always come to expect extraordinary innovation and enthusiasm from the youngsters of the world. 🙂

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KNHC

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      • Some of my favorite radio stations are college stations and I’ve been listening to the same ones for years. It’s interesting to hear the different programming throughout the years. While some of the music has really changed, it’s amazing that a lot of it hasn’t. I was listening to some pretty edgy stuff today with my 5 yr old. She was not amused…she wanted to listen to Katie Perry. Little things like listening to new music gives you a fresher perspective. And young folks are an inspiration.

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    • Indeed — since they’ll be taking over the world soon.

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