Gulp. Mr. Thornton disappears from Category Cloud

I’d been trying to clean up the posts from the last two days and put them in categories (important for me for various reasons, and some people use them to read new materials on the blog). It’s going to take a little longer (it’s also tedious), but one thing is already apparent.

I knew this was going to happen eventually — but it happened today. Mr. Thornton has disappeared from the category cloud of the Top Forty most often discussed topics on this blog.

***Mr. Thornton (Richard Armitage) glances as Margaret as she refills his teacup, in episode 1 of North & South. Source: RichardArmitageNet.com

***

Since it was Mr. Thornton who brought me to Mr. Armitage, this seems momentous. I know that technically, if I’d been labeling as I should have, it would have happened a day or two ago, but.

Head threatens to explode.

~ by Servetus on November 29, 2012.

50 Responses to “Gulp. Mr. Thornton disappears from Category Cloud”

  1. It will return. When the world of women descend to find out about this man and find THAT to watch after the Thorin tornado, it will return. Trust me, you are not gonna find that kiss in The Hobbit or anywhere else. Just saying. ::hug::

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  2. Like you, Serv, I was led by N&S/JT to RA. 😉 I agree with the other ladies that this disappearance of JT from the category cloud is but temporary. As RA himself stated in one of his post-N&S interviews, N&S is right up there among the great classic English love stories; once The Hobbit fans discover the beautiful man behind Thorin, it’ll only be a matter of time before they discover N&S and JT. 🙂

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    • Agree heartily… Just think of it as JT taking a brief vacation.

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    • Yeah, I apologize; I didn’t mean to imply that fans would forget about N&S, but rather that the topic has gone under on the blog in the sea of Hobbit news.

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      • Oh, no apologies necessary. 🙂 Being the website dodo that I am 😉 , I had thought (up until today, that is) that the pre-eminence of certain key words in the category cloud depended on the number of reader hits on the topic – but as you’ve clearly explained, it actually depends on the number of times you actually blog about said topic. Having said that, I’m still sure there will be a revival of Thornton discussions, here and on other blogs.

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  3. Oh my yes! That kiss! Kisses, we should say–in North & South. *swoon* *thud* *baver* Giggles!

    But I love how Richard Armitage’s response to the sexy dwarf question at the ARIA’s last night (Nov. 29) harkened back to his response to the Sexy Thornton question: That people are inspired by the characters.

    Oh Mr. Armitage, you are so humble. But, you bring those characters to vivid life. And that is why we love you so.

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    • yeah, he’s really getting good at demolishing that question. Some of those answers were quite inspired / witty.

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      • I loved his answers. ” I don’ know, you tell me… ” What makes it even funnier is that he was dodging questions on his sex appeal while, apparently, wearing leather pants (or something looking like it) 🙂

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        • well, if women should be able to wear short skirts without people assuming that they’re asking for attention, presumably he should be able to do the male equivalent.

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  4. Thornton and N&S are timeless. You couldn’t get rid of them if you worked at it. JT is lurking in your computer. Good point, wingedvictory, there will be an Amazon run on N&S DVDs. Happens to everyone. 🙂

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  5. I can almost hear Richard’s voice saying during an old interview – referring to John Thornton and North and South: “There was a bit of a kiss at the end; I think that did it.” A BIT OF A KISS? Ha! No, Richard, it was THE kiss to end ALL romantic kisses in the history of historical dramas. Just the thought of it makes my body shiver. The way he looked at her!! I melt each time I watch it. When he reaches out with his right hand to hold her face and his thumb is caressing her cheek, and he leans in…you can see his eyelashes shining and the love pouring out of his eyes. His lips touch hers so tenderly, knowing that she has probably never been kissed before. He doesn’t want to scare her with the passion he feels; he wants her to relax and return the kiss. So he kisses her again and again, tenderly until at last she relaxes and opens her mouth a bit and he takes hold of her lip with his own and pulls a little. That kiss is more erotic than all the ones where the actors ram their tongue down the ladies throat. It makes you want to grab the man you love and ravish him right then and there! I dare anyone to watch it and not SWOON. Poor Richard, he has hopes that people won’t recognize him on the street because he will not be wearing all the Thorin prosthetics, wig and makeup. Uh-huh. Dream on, lovely man, and brace yourself because the women of the world are about to discover you and they will NEVER be able to break the spell you cast. OOOF! *DEAD*

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    • Very lovely rundown on the kiss. Hmm…have you ever tried writing fanfic?! 😉

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    • OMG You killed me here….Still sitting (kinda as I feel so disbanded fluid,,,,) at the office, trying to regain my equamimity or should I say composure?? How shall I concentrate on anything else than this fantasy….
      This should have come with a warning Mujer Tropical!!

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    • Thank you very much for your kind and lovely comments. I am such romantic fool that I tend to get a little carried away thinking about scenes like the one at the train station. As handsome and lovely as Richard is, my deep love for the man stems from his considerable skills as a Master Actor. His capacity to help the audience experience intense cathartic moments while watching his work originates not only from his raw talent, but from the preparation and full dedication to honor his craft. That – combined with the integrity of his character and goodness of his heart – inspires me to hone my own talents and strive to achieve my goals. The man is an inspiration and a light onto this world and I love him because he is someone I can truly admire and respect. His looks are a bonus.

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    • Thank you, mujertropical! I certainly think it was the best kiss in the history of television! Even Richard said thinking about it made him tingle! I agree with the others, Mr. Thornton WILL return! I’m actually thinking about writing a letter to BBC to ask them to release the DVD in Hungary! I mean, it’s unbelievable, they released practically every costume drama they ever produced, apart from N&S!

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      • That will be rectified if/when Richard becomes a bigger star. I still don’t understand why of all period dramas, it seems N&S is always shoved into a dark closet and people must happen across it by sheer luck.

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        • Jane Austen rules. Which is great, if it’s Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth. (I love Austen) But N&S was a very superior television drama. Just wait – after Hobbit, and the promotions, the “old” work will be in demand. :)Just wait till the world discovers Between the Sheets…oh dear.

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          • I very much hope you’re right, fitzg! Re BTS, OMG, the whole world will see “the peaches” in all their glory! I wanted to buy the Hungarian version of N&S DVD for my sister (she doesn’t speak English) and was really annoyed when I realized that it has never been released in Hungary! Wives and Daughters is available, N&S (which IMO is much better than W&D) isn’t!!! An absolute outrage.

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  6. Sorry, guys, but this is truly disturbing. I am the one who labels the posts, so in order for him to rejoin the category cloud, I would have to write about him not just numerically more often, but also proportionally more. That is, he has to be in the Top 40, but that also means something else has to fall out of the top 40. Right now I think the minimum number of posts to get in the Category cloud is ca. 226. I have to think about this more because I haven’t said everything i have to say about Thornton by a mile. I want him to stay in there, but I can only write so many hours per day …

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    • Now you know how I feel about Guy.

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      • This is why every time I think about stopping blogging, I end up in these weird mental circles. I’ve got SO much more to say, and I’ve barely touched on Guy. There’s SO much going in Guy — he’s really Baroque compared to Thornton — and so much that’s personally meaningful. But then I think, how to keep my mind on the present as well? And my own life, what about my own life?

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        • I’ve been thinking of you (and all the others with RA sites) and how in the world you get all this done. Especially when you were describing your set up for the night of the premiere. I was pretty proud of myself just for being able to access twitter and a live feed at the same time. I guess it’s a new world in more ways than one.
          And I feel your pain about your own life although my lack of a life has nothing to do with the RA fandom. I can barely find the time to visit all the sites so I know it must be immensely time consuming for you to produce all the varied pieces you do. But I assume this is a labor of love for you and I know I appreciate you sharing it with me.

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          • Thanks for thinking of us / me. I don’t talk to everyone who does this, but the people I know who do it, do it out of love. I would say I love about 95% of everything about doing this blog, and when I am doing it, it is always the thing I want most to be doing. The other piece is of course that it’s a kind of therapy, and on that level, figuring who I am supposed to be, I prioritize this over some other stuff that might legitimately call my attention. I wouldn’t do it just out of obligation. And, you know, helping to constitute a community means that I have people to help me out at every turn.

            The setup for premiere night was a little extreme. I surprised myself there. I was also lucky that it was a day without teaching or appointments — a “writing day” — so no one but myself was disadvantaged by the amount of time I spent on it.

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        • You mean Guy isn’t part of your own life?

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          • There’s a sort of compromise that’s inherent in this blog that I’ve never fully resolved (maybe because the answer is not clear to me) — I write about Richard Armitage and that is what a good friend called “sending up my antenna and broadcasting that I’m here.” People come to the blog to find out about Richard Armitage and they tell me things and talk to each other and I learn a great deal. I am also genuinely a fan, and I enjoy consuming the latest news about him, even if I’m not as assiduous as some in tracking down the latest tidbits. And I like analyzing *him* obviously, down to the smallest detail. I find him attractive as a person and an artist and I find his body attractive, things that are not separate.

            Guy is a part of my life in the sense that he is one of these archetypal roles that Armitage has played that speak deeply to my own (in that case, professional) experiences. I admit that I find it hugely painful to watch Guy most of the time, especially when he’s experiencing things parallel to my own experiences. I could write just about that — Servetus’ archetypal journey through Armitage’s roles — and I do write about that from time to time, but it’s hard writing, and it doesn’t go quickly, and it’s at a level of detail that confounds the average reader. People who stick with those posts are smart and dedicated and have become good friends because of it. But it’s not the reason most people come here. And the fan community has helped me a great deal. I don’t write to please others here, but I would be lying if I said that gratifying readers plays no role for me, either.

            And then there’s all the pieces of my life that no one here sees, or that I write about only very occasionally, that don’t integrate into Richard Armitage fandom or the search for self and self-integration through watching Armitage. Those things can be be important, too.

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            • All this is true. Forgive me if I seemed glib. I just know that in my life, Guy is a kindred spirit in that we have both worked for bosses from hell, who took pleasure in humiliating us and seeing us fail; we’ve both endured sabotage and betrayal; we’ve been dealt crap hands repeatedly. Archetype on my Jungian journey, yes, as I imagine he is on yours. For me, Guy is also a lot of yum in black leather and I can’t ignore that.

              Sure, there is a lot more happening than would appear on the blog, and the analytical posts are tough to write, but I am so glad you do put time, effort, and thought into sharing what you do.

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              • No, it’s a fair question and something I wrestle with. I don’t do much very easily, in the sense of doing it without worrying about it a lot ahead of time.

                Since my own encounter with Guy, I’ve had *three* conversations with students about this character, all of which were provoked by the “Gizzy’s Girl” coffee mug on my desk. Eventually I may describe what I’ve learned, but two of these stories are so brutal, and so right now it would feel like an invasion of their privacy. Essentially Guy appeals a great deal to some adolescents who find themselves in intolerable, deforming situations. He has given a lot of courage to the people I’ve talked to to go on in inescapable circumstances that convince them that they are going crazy or possibly dying emotionally or maybe changing irrevocably in ways that frighten them. Given how often I have heard this, I have to assume Armitage has had some fan letters about it. I hope he has. That man has literally saved lives.

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            • Those posts were some of my favorites and I would love to read what you have to write about Guy. Guy was my first introduction to RA — the fight scene with the sheriff which I watched again just before the premiere for senitmental reasons. To me that’s one of the things that’s so incredible about RA –that he can make a character in a middling TV series so believable through the nuiances of his craft. I fell for the Guy because he was the underdog, the reformed bad boy, the good guy, lover — lots of things all roled into one. And there are probably a lot of other deeper reasons I haven’t even thought about one of which Leigh mentioned – the boss from hell. Your analysis might be restorative for you and maybe even others.

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              • One other thing I thought about after I watched the premier the other night: What questions would Servetus ask if she were doing the interview?

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                • Not sure about ya’ll, but I heard some pretty lame questions during most of the interviews. The person I was watching even asked somebody how they took their tea?!? Had no idea what to ask as follow up questions, etc.

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                  • Just noticed I’m talking to myself here. Oh well, as my father always said: as long as you don’t answer yourself.

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                    • You’re not talking to yourself — I am just having a hell of a time keeping up with this part of blogging at the moment. I posted 27 posts in one day and that generated a flood of comments the likes of which I have never seen before.

                      Thanks for the kind words. I will write more about Guy eventually. We’re going to have another “dry spell” this year, I think — once we have all seen the movie, but before there’s a DVD, and before Black Sky comes out.

                      I wouldn’t want to interview him on a red carpet, which means i can watch all these interviews with perfect equanimity … 🙂

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    • @Sloan, not talking to yourself – reading your comments! Guy was my first intro to Armitage, too. And I agree with servetus – there has always been so much more to that characterisation to explore (and to BBC Robin Hood) than is superficial.

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  7. Delurking to say Hello. Apparently the story of the NZ premiere is included in Reuters’s “going viral” category on the frontpage of reuters.com (U.S.edition), with Richard’s pic illustrating it:
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/11/28/entertainment-us-hobbit-premiere-idUSBRE8AP1AJ20121128
    Swapping one category for another? 😉

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    • Thanks for delurking!! And yeah. One category for another, that’s for sure. 🙂

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    • Rather ironic that Richard is the photo op….but there’s no mention of him at all!!!
      Makes him the mystery man, I guess.

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      • They were probably wondering who the relly good looking guy was.

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      • As per usual graphic template on reuters.com, the pic is captioned (caption visible if you point the mouse on it). 🙂 “British actor Richard Armitage, who plays Thorin the dwarf, poses on the red carpet at the world premiere of ‘The Hobbit – An Unexpected Journey’ in Wellington November 28, 2012. Credit: Reuters/Mark Coote”

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  8. I did a google scan yesterday of post premiere media reports. Very thin. Reuters etc. focused on PJ, Martin and Andy. It may be that that they are waiting to report on the performance of Armitage? The media thing? This chap is a bit different? How do we slot him? Just musing. But good point, Sloan, journalists no longer do their background legwork. Time is money and salary and deadline…

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    • I think they know that people are reading those reports for info on PJ, MF, AS. The reports on Armitage will accelerate after the 14th. Which kind of has my head spinning.

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  9. John Thornton is my go to character when I need to hear RA’s voice in my ear. Whatever amazing work he does from now on, and I am sure there will be loads, and we will be talking about it when we are all elderly ladies in our dotage, that role will always be my personal favourite. Because of that role I fell in awe of an actor that lights up the screen and as PJ has just said at the Japan press conference you can’t take your eyes of him.

    I am not sure he will pop back into the cloud but I know that his place in RA’s career is up there with the best of them.

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  10. It is so discerning of PJ. That quality of stillness. The actor listens to the voices around him, and to the character in his own head. The response to the others and his own character is the complete immersement of the creative person to the art.

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