*ooof*: Richard “Metallica” Armitage

When I started this post, I was in a black kind of mood and therefore wanted to look at something a bit gritty. Or should I put my offensive excuse of an American accent on and say “griddy”? It would fit today’s *ooof* preddy pretty well, too. Alas, the weather has turned and the sun is shining brightly, with a heatwave splitting the Irish trees. In any case, looking at a RARA image when feeling down is an instant mood lifter! Smile or not, how could you feel depressed when being faced with a double whammy of aesthetics?

Granted, b/w photography has that “image” of being serious, arty, (overly) aesthetic. That is due to the (subconscious? irrational?) association of b/w with a no-nonsense, undistracted concentration on the subject of an image. The subtlety of the tones in a b/w image demand the viewer’s attention, hence the perception of it as a “serious” medium of photography. The fact that we are surrounded by colour photography wherever we look (mostly advertising, but also reading materials and print media, our own holiday snaps etc.) has made b/w comparatively scarce and therefore given it that touch of artsy-fartsy-ness and thus made it a very deliberate, aesthetic choice. And yet, what a relief to look at an image that does not scream colours, attacking our cones with information!

RobertAscroft-16Armitage has still got the grunge. Image by Robert Ascroft, 2012. Source.

B/w images instead scream “grittiness”. Well, not all, but this one sure does. Can you hear it? And the grittiness of the b/w tone is well matched by the composition and the styling. The most obvious is probably the location which itself communicates a feeling of gritty sharpness: The subject is placed beside a metal shutter (the “griddy grid”) through which we see nothing but black darkness. Behind the sitter is a flaky wall. Although the design of the metal shutter makes it clear that these are not prison bars and RA is no convict, there still is an air of isolation and disconnectedness in the image. Shutters obviously separate people from something. They keep people out or in. With the wall behind him, RA looks as if he is shut in, looking out through the shutter. The styling of the subject is appropriately pared-down as well: Armitage is dressed in a simple dark (grey) t-shirt. His chin sports stubble which seems to extend down along his throat, and he shows a tiny bit of chest hair.

The picture as it is composed is very much designed with b/w in mind. In order for b/w to work you need strong contrasts. Experienced photographers are able to visualise a scene in monochrome, they can imagine the tonal translations of the various colours into shades of grey and understand that a successful b/w image needs strong colour differences in order to create distinct tonal contrasts. Hence we have seen previous RARA b/w‘s only when Ascroft shot Armitage against a white, blown-out background from which the sitter very clearly stood out. (Sidenote: All other RARAs are shot against dark or busy backgrounds and are clearly not intended for b/w post-production. You can check that when you compare the Ascroft original with one of the many edits that you can find on fansites. They usually do not work very well – unless they have also been given a complete overhaul for contrast and pushed through a filter. Even my current favourite RARA of Armitage on a box is not ideal in b/w despite a neutral background: The light has been strongly and deliberately directed so as to give a vignetting effect (the darkened corners) which does not translate well into b/w.)

Here, the main contrast is created by the white metal links of the shutter against the black darkness behind it, and the light skin of Armitage’s skin against which his eyes, eyebrows, hair and stubble starkly stand out. I am willing to bet that the metal links of the shutter are not painted white at all even though that seems to be their colour value. Similarly, I am sure that the background was not as dark as it comes across in the image. The details of it were clearly visible to Armitage and Ascroft. The reason the contrast appears so stark is the harsh lighting that Ascroft uses. The strong light gets reflected off the metal shutters, appearing as highlights in the image. As a side-effect, all areas of the image that the light does not reach to appear completely blacked out. However, it could have been possible that the area behind the shutter was in fact lit in daylight – and it still appears like deepest darkest night…

Harsh lighting is not used that often by Ascroft. He seems to prefer the soft shadows of light diffused through a softbox as strong light can appear very unflattering on people. It makes white areas whiter, throws harsh shadows onto the subject or the background and thus draws a lot of attention. It emphasises edges and clearly demarks the lines – check the edges of the shutter links in the centre of the image, they are very sharp. (The edges of the links at the left edge of the image appear softer because of the large aperture Ascroft has chosen and which subsequently blurs the foreground out of focus.) The sharpness of lines also apply to lines on the face of a sitter. If any wrinkles are caught in strong side-light, you will see deep dark canyons of shadow. Not a good look!

With all this in mind, Ascroft decides to use the angular lines of the shutter as perspective lines in the image. The sightlines are easy to define in this picture. By shooting more or less alongside the shutter, Ascroft creates strong diagonals. This is a great and often used device to create a natural focus point in an image. Normally, we would expect the subject of an image to sit in the centre of the frame. This is not the case here – Armitage has been squeezed into the right-hand third. And yet our gaze is immediately drawn to his face. By shooting exactly at eye-level of the subject and by placing himself aligned with the shutter’s horizontal lines, the photographer makes it look as if the lines all converge on RA’s face. All roads lead to Rome…  There are also strong verticals in the image – the shutter links, high-lit by the harsh light, stand out brightly. More diagonals are created by the shadow of the shutter. They are completely at odds with their source and appear (almost) only on the subject’s skin. But observe how cleverly the subject and the light have been arranged respectively: The shadow diagonals do not obstruct the camera’s view of the subject’s eyes. This is extremely important because we need to see the subject’s eyes in a portrait. Ascroft undoubtedly gave RA minute instructions on how to pose in this image. Does that account for the stare on Armitage’s face? Posing is hard work!

This is a very busy composition, plus, one that obscures Armitage’s handsome face quite a bit, and therefore I can easily see how many of you might not consider this as a favourite RA image. It goes along a similar vein as Paula Parrish’s images for Fault Magazine which were “controversial” among fans. Grittiness, it seems, is an acquired taste. And b/w, with its propensity to obscure parts of the sitter due to shadow, seems to be perceived as a tool for hiding and deceiving. Imho it does exactly the opposite: It exposes facets of the sitter that can easily be glossed over in colour photography. It focuses on essentials and distils the essence of the subject in visual representation. Put on deliberately or only as a fleeting expression, Armitage’s facial expression speaks of fortitude and resolution, much the same as what “grittiness” implies. His gaze is a stare, he fixedly gazes off-camera, determinedly. He displays the usual mystery of the smiling eyes and the non-smiling mouth. The effect is the open interpretation of his facial expression – some of us may see him smile, others may find him rather grim-looking. It could be up to your sunny or cloudy personality or your individual disposition.

Personally, this shot reminds me of an album cover. With Thorin “Metallica” Oakenshield in mind, this image has an altogether brazen, brash, resolute feel than other portraits. That is an interesting interpretation of RA. As connoisseurs of l’Armitage we know that he is a classical musician. However, he apparently is a multi-instrumentalist – the cello, the flute and the guitar. Boom! RA hits me right into the feels again. I just love music and I adore musicians. The image has echoes of hard-edged rock photography. I am thinking of Anton Corbijn‘s fantastic work, possibly also because of the use of strong perspective lines in this image. Corbijn has got many examples of that in his oeuvre – Nick Cave, Martin Gore, Herbert Grönemeyer, PJ Harvey, Tom Waits, Bruce Springsteen, to name but a few (click on name to see the images).

Richard Armitage’s debut album as a rock musician. I can’t *quite* see him as a solo-guitarist, although the wonderful picture of a rocking RA by Liza Frank gives us a hint of music fiend RA. The man can rock, undoubtedly, and in Frank’s image we see him doing the air guitar, too, complete with the determined mouth. No tongue of concentration, though – awwww. Yes – that’s the proper way of playing the air guitar! We know he likes rock music with excursions into slightly heavier material – after all he attended the Tenacious D concert in Wellington and looked suitably tired and rocked-out after it. I imagine him more of a collaborative artist, what with his tendency to slip into the background in group shots. But here is Richard “Metallica” Armitage on the cover of his debut album. It’s called “Still Got The Grunge” and features an innovative mix of guitar-based rock with accents of strings and flute. The contrast of romantic flute and hard-edged, guitar-wanking solos has the fangirls in ecstasy and the critics in rapture. He’s put his grittiest look on, fixing the groupies who are queuing outside the backdoor of his concert venue with a fierce stare. “I am a dangerous rock man, primeval, ladies, back off! You may love the sensitive fingers of a cellist, and the sensual mouth of a flautist but beware, guitarists are ANIMALS. Anything is possible, when I’m set loose. One strum of my fingers, and I have you SING!” *ooof*

All text © Guylty at me + richard armitage, 2013. Please credit when using excerpts and links. Images and video copyrights accrue to their owners.

~ by Guylty on July 9, 2013.

71 Responses to “*ooof*: Richard “Metallica” Armitage”

  1. mmm…I love me some Metallica! Now you’ve collided these two for me…How about a little “Master of Puppets”? I like this shot…it is gritty, but not so much as some of the Parrish images.

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  2. a similar shot in color: http://www.richardarmitagenet.com/images/gallery/Richard/Promos/2012Promo/album/slides/RobertAscroft-33.html
    the B&W begs for a deeper meaning in it’s shot, with the long shadows of the shutter, while the color shot focuses more on the human subject; both have their merits 🙂

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    • Yes, that’s the colour version of it. I don’t think it works at all. Or rather: it only works because it has been cropped so closely to RA’s head. Ascroft had to do that, in order to lose all the distracting shutter lines.

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      • I love the color shot 🙂 but it is a slightly different facial expression, and I agree that the longer shot including the multiple shutter lines wouldn’t have worked as well in color. by the same token I don’t think the closer focus would work in B&W; Robert Ascroft knows what he’s doing 🙂

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        • A lot comes down to the facial expression. Just like some of us like the intense look, others only want the happy smile. Personal preference. I think the closer crop might work ok in b/w – but the composition with the shutters is much more visually interesting. Ascroft definitely knows his craft, agreed!

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  3. And again, he’s not looking straight at the camera, so we get a loverly view of his loverly asymmetrical face! Metallica? Hmmm… to me it seems to sing something more along the lines of jazz or blues or a new kind of rock/classical fusion that’s all the rage here in Austin.

    Thank you so much, Guylty, for again shedding your amazing photographic knowledge on us dunderheads. I especially loved how you pointed out that b/w exposes features that we normally miss in color.

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    • I don’t see him as a Metallica fan, either, Chai, I only slipped that in for emphasis :-). Jazz or Blues would suitably match his classically trained credentials, I suppose. From the hints we have had of his taste in music, he seems to be more into slightly Indie/Alternative stuff – The Killers, Keane, with some rock thrown in – Tenacious D, Aerosmith *haha*.
      I am a bit of a missionary when it comes to b/w photography. I just love the pared-down concentration on (a facet of) the essence of the subject. I also think that sitters can be made look better in b/w. But that’s all subjective. Thanks for your kind words 🙂

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      • I totally don’t see an actual connection to Metallica either…a bit on the heavy side I think…I’m only a Metallica dabbler myself – although, the Killers and some of the other bands he mentioned somewhere (I can’t remember where) as being on his New Zealand playlist are a bit “crunchier”. 🙂

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        • Yeah, I’ve been trying to remember where I heard about that. I can only remember The Killers being on it – it resonated with me because I love them, too. – I am not even sure whether I really want to know what he is into. For me, my opinion of people hinges a lot on what music they listen to. I don’t really care much about genre – I am pretty eclectic myself – it just has to be good music. I’d hate it if he turned out to have shite taste in music…

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          • It was a band in that same genre, southern bluesy rock…it’ll come to me. I know what you mean…RA does seem to have fairly eclectic tastes in a lot of things – wouldn’t be at all surprised if music is among them.

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            • Kings of Leon…

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              • he’s mentioned “Cold Play” too

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              • Ugh. Hm. Well, ok, admittedly I have their big hit album, too, but I am not *that* keen on them. On the other hand, it doesn’t disgrace RA totally to quote them. Haha, wow, and now I am the self-styled music expert???
                Thanks for finding that out, Obscura
                Edit: Oh, and Coldplay, too? Grah!!!! very middle-of-the-road (says the woman who owns viva la vida…)

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                • It was in an email I sent to you! I can’t remember where the original source of the quote was from though – Music, like visual art is another totally subjective thing – As long as I don’t have to listen to it…(admittedly, I think my musical journey hit a pot hole sometime around the birth of my first child) Sorry to hijack your ooof!

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                  • Keep hijacking, Obscura – that’s what this is for. Interacting without limits 🙂 Especially when we are discussing music, my first love. – Oh, and I am going to have to rifle through my e-mails then!

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                    • Sorry I have no time to read everything (I’ll do it later, promise) but thinking about Metallica this came to my mind:

                      Love this song. And Coldplay… well, there is something very good they did. But then RA cited Radiohead too. Perhaps he’s trying to listen to something less mainstream 😉
                      I’m eclectic about music and think it’s a very intimate thing. You can’t really say why a song, a music can please you, can get you emotions. Just like a photograph or picture: for a non expert like me you watch it and say “I like it or not, don’t know why”. The same for music, but being a bit more expert I can strip it down to arrangments, instruments, and all the subtleness that are sometimes present also in a song (not to tell the brain tricks discovered not long ago, just read Musicophilia by Oliver Sacks, it’s a must!). Now I’ll stop my non-sense wandering here, see you later for comment of the pic. Thank you as always for your ooof on this particular very, very nice RARA pic! 😀

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                    • Oh yes, Radiohead was another band mentioned. Thanks, Micra! – Looking forward to your (subjective) comments on my (highly subjective) *ooof*! And thank Cod it is all so subjective. If everything was possible to objectively judge and categorize, we’d all have the same opinion. Boring 😉

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                    • Thanks for that vid Micra! I had never heard that unplugged, orchestral version! A LOT of rock music cannot stand on it’s own without amps and over powering guitars…clearly, some can. Same could be said for a variety of different media – I had a student tell me recently that Mozart’s Don Giovanni would be as impactful without the music…say what? Before I could even comment, another jumped in and said, the music could stand alone more successfully than the drama…high five – somebody learned something!!

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  4. I didn’t like this photo of RA at first, but it’s grown on me. I like how you point out that all roads lead to Rome, er, I mean RA’s face. Don’t they just. I love b&w photography. Rock star? Hmmm, I don’t really see it. He looks more like a poet to me in this shot. Thinking of something that rhymes with “escape”? LOL!! Thanks, Guylty. Another informative *ooof*!

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    • I loved this shot from the moment I saw it. It was the strong composition of it that appealed to me. His look – well, not my favourite. As I said, I think he stares too intensely in this. As for the rock album association – totally informed by my love for Anton Corbijn’s rock photography. Hence I interpret the sitter as a rock star, not a poet. On the other hand: This would be a pretty predictable shot for a rock star. Not so much for a poet. After listening to RA reading “Venetia” to me today, I can very well imagine Armitage as a poet, just from his lovely reading…

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  5. What a great *ooof* today. I am reading your post, listening to Depeche Mode and singing. So this is perfect for the mood I am in. I am also home alone.

    B&W seems so much more cleaner than color, crisp. I do like this picture a lot, another one of the t-shirt pictures that I like.

    I think that musicians like different types of music other that what they play, it gives them ideas. I like a wide range of music from classical, jazz, rock, new wave some country, to what ever strikes my fancy. I sang when I was in younger and have not in public since the end of high school. I want to some day learn to play the piano, but that will have to wait till I get done with school. The three boys each have learned to play an instrument or two. Son2 the most with violin, and trumpet but as of the end of the school year gave up the trumpet (gave up violin 2 years ago). He has been listening to some music to the LOTR and TH and with all those violins I was wondering when he would think about lessons again. He also is into Celtic music as of this summer, he said he wished he had learned the flute (he is a RA fan) not sure why. On Saturday I let him listen to Leahy (which I also like) I asked him if all the violins where giving him bad memories, he smiled and told me he would like to take lessons again just no group. As for flute I told him to talk to the band teacher, get back in high school band and he might do after school lessons for him. He told me he would also like to learn to play the harp too. I think when music is there it stays with you and you really don’t get away from it.

    As for string with a song, Depeche Mode’s Home has strings with it and is very pretty. Don’t even get me started on Martin Gore, he is a great songwriter.

    Sorry I got carried away but well music has and will always be a great love.

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    • Music lovers of the world unite, Katie. It is just a wonderful art – I can easier imagine life without photography than life without music! Ouch, does that make me a bad photographer?
      You make a good point – to be a musician, one has to be open to all genres. I don’t dispute that. There are only two types of music, though. Good and bad. And yes, that is subjective to a large degree. Nonetheless, I find, you can tell a lot about people just be hearing what kind of music they are into…
      Wow, you are a musical family, Katie. Great stuff. I have encouraged music in my children from an early age – it is good in every respect. I am working hard on making son into a guitar god (he’s complying nicely 😉 ) Daughter will move on from the recorder this summer and start on the trumpet. Bring on the earplugs!!! Myself, I started out on the recorder and learnt piano until a nasty piano-teacher ultimately put me off. Nowadays, I only sing along, but loud and proud 😉
      Glad I caught your taste with Martin Gore!

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    • Katie70, I love that your son is so into music, but please, unless the band director is himself a flute player, have him get a private teacher. A woodwind player really needs a woodwind teacher, not a brass person. I speak as a lifelong flute player still active in local chamber music/orchestras. Okay, I’m scuttling of into the shadows to avoid the rotten veg…

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      • Chaifreak, my sons band teacher has been for the past three years and I think all will go ok, son will let me know if not. This year are school cut a music teacher and since the high school band teacher retired the middle school teacher is going there and doing both. I fear the very good program go down the drain due to money. I hope the violin teacher he ends up with is the one he had the last year, who also writes music and has a couple of bands. I do think both band teachers where first trumpet players, but I do know we have had class A place at state in flute and other instruments.

        Guylty, You are not a bad photographer, after all you can see pictures in your mind just as well as with your eyes, music can help with that. There is the type of music that is great and then that grates my nerves. The type that grates my nerves get it off now. There are a lot of people who don;t ever want to listen to something new, they listen to the same stuff over and over.

        All the boys had to take recorder for music from 3rd grade – 5th grade. Son1 had to take band or choir in the school we where at in 6th grade we moved he kept up the trumpet two more years. Son3 took one year of viola and maybe he will get back into it to. Son2 also talked about the bagpipes too and yes my very small town has someone who could teach him. Practicing can be a pain, but I love to hear them play. None of the boys can can sing, just mom and dad. My husband makes up silly songs that drive us crazy.

        Richard, Martin Gore and I are all Leos, maybe there is something in it.

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        • Oops I got my years wrong, son2 has been with his band teacher for 4 years so far. He started band in in 5th grade and violin in 4th grade.

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  6. Boz Scaggs–Georgia– “how were we to know that wasn’t moonlight, it was searchlights…”

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    • Thanks for that, Arkie – I had not heard of Boz Scaggs before, but he vaguely reminds me of Steely Dan, whom I love. Playing his greatest hits now 🙂

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    • Arkenstone – Boz Scaggs ROCKS! I actually downloaded the whole album and have been listening to nothing else all morning. Love this kind of Blues, Funk. The soundtrack to my summer. Thanks for a great suggestion!

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      • Glad to introduce someone to my guy! Up until a couple of years ago Boz had never done a concert. He was strictly studio. I’d always said I’d pay anything to see him in concert. I think the only concert he did was overseas and out of my price range… I’ve loved his work since I was a teen and I’m way beyond that now… MY PERSONAL favorites–Georgia obviously and “You Can Have me Anytime.” At the end of the song is a guitar solo by Santana that will curl your toes, I can’t listen to it without Air Guitar!! Now it’s me, RA and Santana —Air Guitaring Boz Scaggs. It don’t get any better than that, Baby!!!

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        • I saw on YT that he played concerts in Vegas. Did you eventually get to see him? “You can have me anytime” is not on my compilation. Got to check that out – Love Santana’s languid, masturbatory guitar-solos. Better practice my air guitar.

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          • You might find “you can have…” on his album “Hits” if not let me know. I have it and might be able to send you an MP3…

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            • I listened to it on YT, Arkenstone. May I meekly and carefully say that I prefer his earlier stuff? Subjectivity hits again 😉 But thanks!! The music is still playing. I love “Miss Sun” – that was written for ME (my nickname being “Sun”)

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              • If Boz is singing it, I love it! I love Miss Sun! There are a couple of songs I can scan past, but not many… I was laughing at some of the replies because I had not a clue who some of the names were and wasn’t able to find them…in answer to your question about seeing him. I did see him. It was and is my greatest thrill, dare I say I’ve been married twice, so that thrill is gone….LOL

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                • Cool. I am so glad to hear you saw him in concert. I love live events like that, it is special to be there and witness everything with your own eyes. And there is something thrilling to them, yes.

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    • Cool band! thanks for the tip, Arkenstone 🙂

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  7. I cycle through desktop wallpapers pretty often, with diverse taste. Art, nature shots, fashion, animals, maps, beautiful people. For my own personal reasons, there are certain actors I’ve always avoided using as background images despite liking them or finding them attractive. (I don’t even fully understand my psychology of being willing to appreciate some people purely aesthetically or objectify them, if you will, while staunchly refusing to treat others as just another piece of art in the background.) Richard Armitage is one of the ones who has never lived on my computer screen.

    Until now.

    The first time I saw this photo, I was struck by all of its pleasing aesthetic qualities, and I had a brief moment of temptation to set it as my background. (Which makes it one of only two Armitage photos to prompt that urge from me.) But I told myself no, because somewhere in my brain I have a mental block against displaying him in that manner.

    Your *ooof*, however, has reminded me of everything about it that I find pleasing from an artistic standpoint. This isn’t just a photograph of a man I find attractive, this photo is a piece of art worthy of gallery wall space. As you talked about the gritty sharpness, the geometry of the lines, the feeling of containment, the purity of the contrast between dark and light, the juxtaposition of the simplicity of the composition against the complexity and the enigma of his expression, I found myself right-clicking.

    I’ve crossed into some kind of unfamiliar territory and it feels weird to see his face living on my screen, but I certainly don’t blame you for doing this to me. Because look at him. 😉

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    • *squeeee* Hey Alyssa, for some reason it really makes me happy to think that I contributed to your decision to make this RARA your wallpaper. I can somehow see where you are coming from with your staunch refusal to expose RA to an objectifying gaze that may get worn down by daily perusal… I am without scruples when it comes to that. I have set my PC to change wallpapers daily and automatically, and my chosen images are close-up portraits of RA. Frankly, it sometimes is almost disturbing when I encounter a smouldering Porter-like stare when I boot up the PC in the morning. But ultimately it makes me smile – partly because I laugh about my own infatuation. Choosing the gritty RARA b/w, however, is a clever move. You can still justify it to yourself that it is a purely artistic choice…
      I’d love to know which other RA image you allowed onto your wallpaper before?

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    • Welcome to our world, alyssa…..sit down, I’ll make you a cuppa.

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  8. It´s pretty hot here in Germany and my thoughts are even getting hotter now. Yes, I want the “Still Got The Grunge” album… Maybe this is RA´s next project ? :):)

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    • Yeah, the heatwave outside doesn’t make any of this easier, Ute. Same here in Ireland. – Just imagine, RA making an album of music… Well, a lot of actors branch out into that. I’d certainly give it a go, listening to it, I mean.

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  9. I cannot express how much I loved your *ooof* my dear! You can always let me see things I didn’t noticed or, just in case, understand that these things are not casual, but fruits of a very hard work. I really love B/W images and think they do a wonderful service to the sitters (if they are interesting, of course 😉 ). I undoubtly prefer this version to the colored one. Those eyes… and the gaze. Loneliness, sadness or desire of freedom. So many symbols in this RARA pic. One of my fave, indeed. And you are perfectly right in thinking about Corbijn: he did so many wonderful rockers’ portraits! And, if I’m not telling silly things here, also his coloured pics play very much with shadows and light.
    This RARA pic made me think to a wonderful “song” ( more a real piece of art) by Joni Mitchell: Shadows and Lights. It is perfect to describe the mixed (spiritual) feelings this image evokes in me. Sorry as usual for my English 😀 and thank you again!

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    • I’m in trouble…I have 983 shots of RA/Thorin/John/Lucas, etc that continually cyclle on my screen. My 90 year old mother likes to look at them too….should I make a Psych appointment for 2?

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      • I probably don’t have 983 photos of RA but I’ve got the screensaver on my personal laptop set to randomly display images of him, in his various guises, that I’ve downloaded over the years. Maybe we can get a group rate if we band together?

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        • If we go into group therapy, can we make sure that the therapy culminates in the therapist bringing in the subject of our obsession so that we may face it in full force?

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      • LOL – no! You are just women, reacting to a beautiful sight. If that makes you a psycho, I will join the therapy. – I love the idea that a 90 year old woman is as much stirred by RA as I am. It actually gives me hope that those powerful feelings of attraction do not diminish with age.

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        • My mother is a hoot. She was telling me that when she was young it was Nelson Eddy. I found an old shot of him as a “Mountie” and one of his head shot. Put it on one side. Put an RARA and Thorin on the other side and gave it to her as a joke. She had it framed. It sits on her table by her chair in the living room. She told me once that she liked looking at Thorin because she was pretty sure that was what God would have wanted his son to look like…You can’t help but love her!

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          • Love it. I want to be like that when I am 90! And I would love to share such fun with my own mum… Lucky you! I am sure you treasure her, dearly.

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            • My Mom likes him too, which is total surprise cuz she tends to ridicule my heroes. It was not so long ago when she was laughing out loud at my Colin Firth-do you imagine?! 😀
              Thank you for this *ooof* Guylty:) I think I want such a wall mural 😉
              I’m plesantly surprised by the size of this picture (wonder if Richard likes those large pictures too 😉 ) anyway *cough* I have lot of counting (so little time- so many RAlashes)..so, if you would excuse me …

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    • Glad to hear that this is one of your faves, too, Micra, and that you agree with my theories. – I think Corbijn’s colour photography is more about light than about shadow, and he plays a lot with cross-processing (using chemicals for b/w film instead of colour film when processing the images in the darkroom), which results in unusual pops of colours. But the effect is really interesting, and gritty in a colourful way.
      I love, btw, how this discussion has brought music in. I listened to Joni and yes, a strange, seductive song, full of harmony and emotion. Fits the feel of the image. Thanks for that Micra!!

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  10. This image is the wallpaper on my personal laptop. It’s very striking and just sucks me in completely.

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  11. […] classic and classy approach. ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof […]

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