And now I — finally — grasp this.

 

TI2_131Claude Monet (Richard Armitage) paints at the deathbed of his wife in episode 2 of The Impressionists. Source: RichardArmitageNet.com

~ by Servetus on July 13, 2013.

20 Responses to “And now I — finally — grasp this.”

  1. Yes, art to overcome grief, desperation, lossness. Great scene, that one. Love The Impressionists so much I can hardly esplain. And yes, being a biography it’s full of “real life” moments. Hugs :-*

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  2. It’s one of the things you are not sure you want to understand. But the time comes. Hugs, my friend. Love you.

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  3. He paints; you write. He – what he sees. You – what you feel

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  4. This scene was so beautifully done and it still breaks my heart each time i watch it.

    Words cannot really convey what it actually feels like to be at the bedside of a loved one who is dying and I have experienced it with both my husband and my father. Having been a nurse I was also at the bedside of patients too but it is so very different when it is family. Your emotions are engaged in a totally different way.

    My heart goes out to you dear friend as you deal with your mother’s illness and being a support to your father at the same time. Please know you are in my thoughts and I pray you will be given the strength to bear all this.

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  5. It is such a gripping moment in the films for me. His mechanism to cope with his warring emotions and overwhelming feelings and how he tries to get through a time which the brain can’t grasp, but needs to find its way through. I hope you will find coping mechanisms that help you get through your pain. A warm and hopefully supportive embrace from me ((()))

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  6. It feels so inadequate to send my thoughts of support to you and your mom but here they are. Words of comfort from a stranger who doesn’t feel like one. But we all know how powerful words are, and by sharing yours I hope you can gain strength and peace through this sad time.

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  7. Bless you for simply being there. That is the greatest gift to your mother: she is not alone and she is loved.

    The grapefruit image is wonderful – the Rose window of Notre Dame.

    Wishing you continued courage and strength and comfort. And that your mother is much comforted by your devotion.

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  8. As shocking as it initially was, this was the redeeming scene from the whole series for me. Art is an expression of emotions. Your blog is, too. I hope this blog gives you the strength to go through what lies ahead. Fühle dich fest umarmt von mir.

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  9. I’m so sorry that you and your family are going through this. Being there for a loved one at the end is so important – which you obviously recognize – and it’s something that you can be grateful for in the time to come. But it’s also so tough, so draining, and it can eat away at you if you don’t care for yourself, too. I’m glad that you can use RA for a little bit of self-care during this.

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  10. Hugs!

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  11. I am humbly grateful for souls like yours on this earth. Sending strength to you and your family.

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  12. Art always is a result of pain, conflict, and passion. I know. My best work is from it.

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  13. It’s the weariness and despair. Something I wish he and all of us only ever had to “act”.

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  14. Wish you all the strengh you need to bear the situation. I pray for you und ich drücke dich in Gedanken, servetus.

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  15. So viele Menschen kommen hierher, gerade zu Dir, Servetus. Sicher am Anfang werden sie ausschließlich von jemand anderem, mit anderen Initialen, mit einem bekannten Gesicht gelenkt… Zufällig finden sie diese konkrete Adresse, um aber ziemlich schnell diesen Platz gern zu haben / einzuschätzen, und das alles, was sein Symbol ist und was mit ihm am tiefsten verbunden ist. Auch ich wurde auf diese Weise vor einiger Zeit geführt.
    Jedes Treffen mit einem anderen Menschen prüft so viel, z.B. ob wir zur authentischen Freundlichkeit fähig sind, zur Ehrlichkeit, zur Liebe und ob wir in allen diesen Gefühlen wahr sind. Ob wir auf jemand beharren können, verschiedene Arten der menschlichen Gefühle mitfühlen, und insbesondere diese, die am meisten verletzen: Wehmut, Verzweiflung und Leid, an denen doch nur vorläufig eine andere Person teilnimmt. Unwichtig, dass wir sie in der Wirklichkeit nicht kennen, dass wir nicht wissen, wie sie aussieht, dass wir wegen der Sprachbarrieren nicht alles ausdrücken können, was wir sagen möchten… Ob wir diesen anderen Menschen darin einschätzen, was er erlebt. “Soviel wissen wir von uns selbst, wie viel wir geprüft wurden”. Das ist wahr. Ich habe diese leichtrote Grapefruitscheibe gesehen. Ich assoziierte sie, wie Fitzg, mit einem Glasfenster. Sie erinnerte mir an eine Metapher, die ich einst gelesen habe. Wenn wir uns die Schönheit der farbigen Glasfenster zu erblicken wünschen, reicht nicht nur das hellste Licht des Innenlebens aus. In diesem Licht werden sie nur mit dem dunklen Glas unleserlich sein. Um das Glasfenster zu sehen, sind die darin und dadurch eindringenden Strahlen von Außen unentbehrlich.
    So ein schönes und warmes Licht, das die wirklich zu ertragen schwere menschliche Dunkelheit erhellt, geben alle diese Worte, die Du in den Kommentaren lesen wirst, und die ein Zeichen der schönsten menschlichen Emotionen, Empathie, der ehrlichen Freundschaft und Herzlichkeit sind. Es helfe Dir das Licht von Außen, das Licht vieler freundlicher Unterstützungsworte ein bisschen die Dunkelheit in Deinem so geplagten Herzen beseitigen und es bringe Dir den notwendigen Trost.
    In diesen schweren Momenten bitte ich in den Gedanken um Erleichterung im Leiden für Deine Mutter.

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  16. Every time I’ve seen this episode, I’ve thought Monet was such a shit for painting his dying / dead wife at her deathbed. I get it now. I’m not in control of anything …

    Thanks for taking the time to write all of these wonderful comments. I want to come back to them as the week passes — it’s all a bit too much for me at the moment. They are very thought-provoking and inspiring and above all truthful.

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  17. I’m so sorry you are having to go through this with your mum, Servetus. When my mother was ill in hospital after a stroke, unable to speak, or eat, or move very much, I sat beside her bed knitting a brightly coloured scarf out of beautiful soft yarn. It gave me something to do for those long hours, and started conversation with all the various staff and visitors to came through, plus the repetitive motion of knitting, and the lovely colours were soothing.
    You are a good daughter.

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  18. My Mom’s last day my Dad and I got to the hospital, I got him settled (by this time mom could not talk due to the meds) talked to the nurses and then off to the restroom which I really needed to use. While I was in there I had this feeling she was leaving us, and was out of there fast. Call her sister to let her know so she could say goodby. Mr 70 had the same feeling when his Dad passed away, that he was leaving.

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  19. Thanks very much for the additional comments and reassurance.

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