*ooof*: In the Bag

The gauntlet has been flung at my feet. A suggestion of a press photograph is one thing. But to also provoke some outrageous narrative from my dry mind is a challenge I can’t resist. This has the potential to fail spectacularly, but I like to live dangerously. A bit of adrenaline here and there keeps the blood pressure busy. Let’s start easy, with a look at press photography.

raontheground_zpsd751f813

Wellington Touchdown
Armitage and Freeman arriving at Wellington Airport, Nov. 2012
Picture via RAfrenzy

Today’s image was suggested by Kathy Jones. For once we have an image that is quite clearly RL, even with a proper date and occasion attached – RA’s arrival in Wellington in November 2012 before the world premiere of THAUJ. Pictured here are Armitage and Freeman at the airport, surrounded by a group of female assistants (?), supposedly on their way from the plane to the terminal. It is safe to assume that the image was shot with a zoom from a good bit away – we assume that because we know that an airport is a high-security area where photographers cannot move freely. In order to freeze the motion and avoid any blur, the image has been shot with a fast shutter speed. The image is reasonably clear – except for the background – and must have been shot with a mid-range aperture to keep the (moving) people in the foreground clear while blurring out the unimportant background. The facial expressions on the two protagonists are not exactly ideal. Does the word “derp” come to your mind? Well, press photography is not about beauty! This is merely recording the event. “Two famous actors arriving back in Wellington”. Not “photo shoot to make two famous actors look good and desirable while arriving back in Wellington”.

I have not *ooof*ed many press photographs so far – as images for an analysis, the deliberately styled, posed and post-produced images of studio and location photography offer more beefcake  “meat”. The composition of those images can be considered more controlled in every respect; the photographer’s (and even the sitter’s) input is much more independent from circumstance than in press photography. That is not to discredit press photography. Merely to say that press photography is a different kettle of fish than studio work or press call images. Press photography, essentially, is news photography. Press photographers attempt to tell a story through images. They document events. As such, press photography is always shot on location, under pressure, in a highly competitive environment. Flexibility of movement is essential on press photography assignments – the photographers have to find the best perfect angles and vantage points from which they shoot. Sometimes they need to move fast, or even shoot while they are moving, and therefore press photographs are shot hand-held. There is essentially no time for major artistic consideration – apart from choosing your angle and a quick crop to enhance the image after shooting. If photography has a documentary nature at all, this is the only place in photography this could be said of.

All photographers obviously rely heavily upon their gear. I find this particularly the case with press photography. You will have noticed in the occasional shot that includes the press photography gang in the background that press photographers come with two cameras slung over their shoulders. This is not really because they are insatiable camera perverts. Bringing two cameras is essential in order to be prepared for all eventualities. In the context of an event that means having two cameras at the ready – one with a long lens, usually a zoom (70-200mm, occasionally even longer, with a fast lens of f 2.8 at least), and another with a fast prime. (Excursion into technicalities: A prime is a lens that has a fixed focal length – the focal length being the distance between the sensor/film and the actual optical lens. A 50mm prime is the most widely used prime lens – it roughly corresponds with the angle we can take in with our own eyes (about 46°). A picture made with 50mm focal length thus represents reality *as we see it*. Any focal length below 50mm is considered a wide angle – it takes in a wider expanse than what you see through a 50mm lens. Anything above 50mm will narrow down the actual frame of what you see through the lens, but it simultaneously enlarges what you see, much like binoculars.) You need a zoom in case the action happens far away and you have to enlarge the image on your sensor. You need a shorter prime for close-up action. Changing the lenses on one camera body would be impossible – too time-consuming and also not advisable outdoors as you might get dust blown into the camera and onto the sensor – therefore two cameras are the easiest option. – The two cameras are also equipped with two flashbodies, as it is advisable for photographers to “bring their own light”, especially when there is cross-lighting (for instance tungsten light from lamps indoors while daylight streams in through a window – the flash can drown out those lightsources and therefore create better results, quick.)

Have I nerded you out? On a more practical level, press photography presents a number of challenges that you need to have the right skill-set for to address. Press photography is a waiting game. There is a lot of time spent waiting for the actual event to happen – and a press photographer can’t afford to be late. Sometimes, it is of course a case of being in the right place at the right time. But even that can occasionally be brought down to instinct, sensing where something might be happening, and therefore being there before others. It is a highly pressured job, very competitive, where freelancers have no guarantee that they will be able to sell the work that they have produced. This in turn means that a press photographer (when free lance) tends to work all day, every day – or at least has the camera at the ready at all times. It can also be physically demanding in the sense that you are operating heavy equipment. Try holding a 10 pound camera plus lens plus flash for any length of time. You need muscles – and a steady hand, in order to get those hand-held shots free from camera shake. (The text book rule is that you should always have a shutter speed at least the same number as your focal length. So if you are shooting with a 400mm lens, your shutter speed needs to be at least 1/400. With a much smaller lens such as a 50mm prime, you can hand-hold longer shutter speeds. As mentioned before – the rule of thumb is that you can hand-hold shutter speeds of down to 1/60 of a second. I am pretty steady and go down to 1/30 of second on a regular basis. But my equipment weighs only half of that of a press photographer with 400mm zoom, who sometimes manage even 1/15 of a second hand-held. Ice-cold cool dudes, those guys!!)

Technically, press photography is not necessarily as demanding as studio photography. Nowadays, theoretically, you could shoot all kinds of photography with automatic settings. Yes, technology is that good. It is for artistic reasons, that (studio) photographers choose to shoot manually, carefully considering the effect they want to produce on their images. For press photographers, shooting automatic is almost a God-send – when you have to shoot fast, there is little time for adjusting your focal length, the aperture and the shutter speed, or even focussing. The ability of modern cameras to shoot multi-exposures is another great development, meaning the photographer just keeps the shutter release button pressed down and the camera continues shooting frame after frame. Too much, however, is not necessarily a good thing, because after shooting comes the editing – and if you have to find 4 to 5 usable shots (the average number of shots usually required by picture editors for an event), it will not serve you well if you have to go through 1000 shots to find those perfect 5…

With all that in mind, I hope you can see that press photography is a genre of its own – and the images resulting from it are true to life, but not necessarily as drool-worthy than most of the studio work. That depends on your own aesthetic preferences, of course, whether you prefer RL situations or an idealised interpretation of the subject. Whatever it may be – images, whether studio-made or shot for press purposes, capture one moment, and they both have the power to evoke feelings, thoughts, ideas or creativity.

The latter didn’t come that easy to me, for this image. Maybe because I personally and generally do prefer studio work and appreciate the artistic considerations that have gone into them over the RL quality of press work. Plus, Kathy’s suggestion, that this ficlet could place the subject in a completely fantastical situation probably exceeded the limits of my imagination? This is the fruit of my labour:

The therapist stroked his stubbled chin in a thoughtful gesture. His latest client was a tough nut. He had been referred to him for anger management issues. “De-snarking”. Under pressure, the small man would easily snap, become extremely rude and pour buckets of acerbic vitriol on those who were unlucky enough to be around him. Apparently it was affecting his working relationships, hence his client’s boss had sent him to see a therapist after a few unsavoury scenes in the workplace, involving an inordinate amount of expletives, a number of thrown items and several big contracts falling through because of inappropriate slandering, reviling and abusing of customers.

 The therapist was an expert in the field of anger resolution, and his ever rising number of clients and subsequent success stories was testament to that. This client, however, had him in a fix. The man was extraordinarily pleasant to him whenever he came for his scheduled therapy sessions. All smiles, compliments and an obvious friendly approval and consideration of him. The therapist had yet not been able to catch him out on one of his outbursts. And he needed to get him to blow his top, before he could address the issue. He obviously didn’t push the client’s buttons. Or his own calm and collected personality was too decent for the client to pull his usual stunts. He needed to come up with a plan… draw the client out and make him spew his fire like a dragon – which, he had been told, the man was still doing at work, much to the despair of his boss and colleagues. Heck, the case was beginning to have him vexed. “For fuck’s sake – I am *the* authority in anger resolution. I’ll be damned if this guy gets away with it.” He slammed his fist on his desk and his teacup wobbled theatrically on its saucer. Damn. It was himself who’d be needing anger management lessons soon, if he couldn’t get his client to show his real self. Some drastic measures had to be taken.

 —

 Today was the day. He was taking him on a field trip. “Mr F___,” he had said, “I’d like to accompany you on your next business trip and see you in action.” “Sure”, the client had agreed. “I like having you around. You’re a good influence.” The therapist had gritted his teeth at that. We’ll see about that, mister!

 So here they were. The therapist was taking the client to the most stressful environment known to 21st century man – the airport. If you didn’t already hate flying, then the long queues, the overpriced cups of coffee, the lack of smoking facilities, the annoying fellow travellers, the rude security officers, the long waiting times and the restrictive airport security rules would certainly get you. Yes, he had this one in the bag. So far the client had kept his cool, despite having been charged 7.50 Dollars for a cup of tepid, vile coffee and being run into his ankles by an octogenarian traveller and her out of control baggage trolley (an assistant, who had surreptitiously followed them around). They had joined the longest check-in queue and the air steward on the desk had been sufficiently discourteous, informing them that the flight was delayed and Business Class was overbooked, so they’d have to sit in Economy. No eruption, yet. But the client would break, he’d make sure of that. They were striding towards the security check, already, and he couldn’t help but smile self-satisfactorily at the mayhem that was bound to erupt as soon as they got there. A 200ml bottle of baby oil, a small pen-knife and an envelope filled with icing sugar would do the trick. He shouldered his bag. The client would not live this one down, he’d capture it on film, with the camera hidden in his bag. Oh this would be the highlight of his professional career… His clinic’s name would be all over the academic journals. “RA – Resolving Anger”. He definitely had this one in the bag!

All text © Guylty at me + richard armitage, 2013. Please credit when using excerpts and links. Images and video copyrights accrue to their owners.

~ by Guylty on October 22, 2013.

44 Responses to “*ooof*: In the Bag”

  1. Heh-heh-heh! Guylty, you have definitely nailed this one. I should know, having recently had to journey from Heathrow to Malaga, via Oslo. I did lose it when I arrived in Malaga too late to get a bus or a train home, exhausted and in pain. I was forced to choose between finding a hotel and taking a cab, for roughly the same exorbitant cost. Yes, that is one wily therapist!

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    • From London via OSLO???? to Malaga??????? What the…??? Going East before heading Southwest? Weird. I would’ve totally lost it if I had been you. And nothing worse than having a journey prolonged because of missing trains. You have my compassion.
      Don’t get me started on air travel. And I have had my share of nasty run-ins at the security check, too. I could be the “client” in this ficlet…

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  2. Again, one of my fave pics! Very interesting, learning that press photography is so demanding. And the ficlet! Makes you wonder what ticks Mr. Anger Management off. 🙂

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    • Oh yeah, I wouldn’t want to be a press or event photographer myself. Too many unknowns. And the whole stress of it all. Constant pressure to get the shot. Nah, not for me.
      As for Mr Anger Management – not succeeding with something? Not reaching own high goals? Plus, the circus question *ggg*. Just a guess 😉

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  3. Thanks for this technical explanation, now I’ll look at press photographers with new respect. Can we say that they “take” photographs while studio photographers “make” pics?
    And about the ficlet: nothing like airport mayhem can let the poor client go out of his head. I have a suggestion, though. Let’s force him to buy a train ticket with Trenitalia via computer here in Italy. Therapist can’t fail, I assure you.

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    • Aha! Good student Micra is using the knowledge she has gained, applying the jargon of the field *ggg* in context. Mistress Guylty approves! Hm, tricky to say though – I’d still say they “make” pictures. But that is maybe more a nod to their technical abilities which I am sure press photographers have in spades. But you are right with the word choice in that they do not create a deliberate, artistic impression. How about we say “press photographers shoot pictures” *ggg*
      Hehe, I imagine that the therapist will need to take his client on several such field trips until the anger management issue is fully resolved. Buying a trainticket for Italy sounds like a “fun” exercise…

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      • Happy to have Mistress Guylty approval! 😀
        Yes, trying to buy a ticket is really a fun exercise and a very quick way to transform a citizen in a terrorist. Not only interface is the most confusing at all, but official site is down every moment. And it crashes while you’re buying. And, da***d them all. they get you the most expensive options as default, so people that ignore this thing thinks there are no cheaper solutions. Thieves. Rage management? Oh yeah, you can really prove yourself with Trenitalia.

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        • Micra, thanks for this early warning. I’ll be visiting Italy next year and am now thinking I might cycle from city to city rather than entrust my meagre euros to Trenitalia! The autostradas are nice and safe, aren’t they? 🙂

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          • Motorways are good but only for cars and motorbikes and with toll. Normal roads quality varies from Regions. Italy is not a cycle friend place in the cities 😦 Trains are usually dysfunctional but they can be a good mean to go from one place to another if you stay calm and patient. There are Regional trains that doesn’t cost too much but there are usually delays. Italians use cars above all. There are metros in some big cities, not in mine, Florence. If you need more information just tell me and I’ll try to be more specific, by email 😉

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  4. Fascinating, as ever! I do have a question, though. What makes this a ‘press photo’ and not ‘paparazzi’? They both try to catch their subjects in real life, I imagine their equipment is similar, is it simple that we’re in a public place here?
    Loved the ficlit, Mr. A trying to annoy Mr. F… reminds me of the sixty seconds interview, “just torment people forever”.

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    • Good question. Well, I know it is press photography, because I have seen the source of the image (SNPA – I should actually put the copyright holder into the image caption above…), a reputable photo agency that does not seem to offer paparazzi work in their service. Also, paparazzi work tends to be shot with the intention of making the subjects look ugly/angry/stupid/pissed off etc – I don’ t think that is quite the case here, even if Freeman’s open mouth is slightly unflattering. But that was not really the point of the photograph – otherwise the photographer would’ve zoomed in more…
      I think your question is really good, Carly. It never occurred to me that viewers might mistake press photography work for paparazzi filth – but then again, I have friends who work as press photographers and I am familiar with their job. I do think it is important to distinguish between the two types of photography – most press photographers want to cover news, not uncover celebrity misconduct, and unfortunately the press has been unfairly identified with the bad behaviour of paparazzi. (Not by you, but often by celebrities who were (rightfully) annoyed with press attention and labelled the photographers “paparazzi”)-

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    • Sooo, are paparazzi and press both freelance? And if so, I suppose photographers could sell to whomever was buying? Just curious. I also wonder if Mr. A really wore those jeans on the plane for twelve plus hours? Really? I hope not, if he didn’t that does explain hastily donned boots that aren’t laced… but alas,not a hair out of place to suggest the mile high club….KIDDING…JUST KIDDING!

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      • Paparazzi are freelancers. Press photographers can be both – either working for a publication or agency full-time, or freelancing and selling to reputable publications. And yes, both have to sell their work to whoever is buying. (Although they of course can choose to avoid disreputable rags etc.)
        I am going to expose myself as a dirty, stinking European now, but: Why would he not have been wearing his denims for 12 hours on the plane? Is there a half-life on clothes-wearing-time? Do people seriously bring a change of trousers for a long-haul flight? Honestly, that has never occurred to me. But then again, anything is possible in the show-biz…
        Mile-high-Club LOL. I sure hope not. And cannot imagine it…

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        • I have flown long-haul flights over the years, between the West Coast of the U.S. and Spain. The usual time door to door about 30 hours, including layovers, transfers, and trains. I don’t change clothes, not unless the layover is overnight. That is pretty normal.

          As a member of the Mile High club, I can only say that once upon a time, flying was more glamourous, cleaner, with more room to maneuver. Now, I’d only dare try it in first class, perhaps on Virgin Atlantic.

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          • JC, Leigh!!!!!!!!!! I thought that was just a myth????? So it does exist? Naughty girl, you 😉
            Oh and re. change of clothes: glad to hear you say that. (Unless long years of living in Europe has corrupted you to our ways ;-)) just kidding!

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            • A myth?! I assure you it isn’t. I joined in 1980, and I knew members who joined before I did.

              No, not corrupted — just unless you stay at a cabin like in the airport at Copenhagen, there isn’t anywhere to shower and change, not even in most VIP lounges. I have had to change in a toilet stall in Albuquerque NM, when turbulence caused red wine to drench my clothing down to my knickers, but it was far from comfortable or easy, and of course, no shower. Now I always fly with a packet of wipes; they have to serve.

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              • Hehe, that packet of wipes is still with me since my kids were babies *ggg*. They do all sorts of tricks – the wipes (not the kids). And yes, I have yet to fly through an airport that has shower facilities or proper resting areas where you can lie down for a couple of hours without being afraid of being robbed or raped…

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  5. I adore Martin Freeman and think he’s a great actor, but what a contrast, despite the similar colors. Pennyloafers and blazer vs. work boots and leather jacket. Do you think that contrast was going through the photographers mind, Guylty?

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    • Another interesting question. Well, to be honest, no, I don’t think that the photographer really noticed that as he was shooting. He just wanted a shot of the actors arriving, and he had no way of knowing who was going to walk off the plane with whom. It is a lucky coincidence to see the contrast so clearly – and kudos to you for noticing it! Also, the photographer would have had too little time to plan a “theme” like that. I’d say it was a matter of “shoot now, look later”…
      Armitage and his get-up would have stood out to me, too, had I been there. The boots are so cool, and I love that he has not tied the laces…

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  6. Excellent piece. Full of information not just about photography but about the people behind it.

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    • I am glad you are saying that, Peggy – I suppose I am trying to take up the cudgels for photographers of all genres (whoa, learnt a new phrase there – cudgels… what are they??). It’s great to get your questions and feedback. Thanks!

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  7. Loved the analysis of press photography. I didn’t realize it was so physically demanding. Do you think that is why it is still a male dominated profession? Your ficlet was great. Thank you so much. Air travel is a target rich environment for rage. I hope RA has hired a screaming baby to sit behind MF, a passenger that reclines his seat into his face, a seatmate that overflows into his space, a broken movie system, no wi fi , oh the possibilities are endless. I also notice that it looks like RA is about to goose MF from behind. That could ratchet up the annoyance level a notch or two. Isn’t that something a bloke would do to another bloke? Just innocent masculine horseplay. Thanks again for sharing your expertise in such an entertaining way. Hugs for a job well done.

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    • Oh yeah, it is quite physically demanding. And I can definitely say so, especially today as I did four straight hours of back-to-back product shots. I am knackered. Mostly from concentrating on getting the lighting right, but also from hunching forward, on bent legs, with my camera in front of my face, lifting lights around, securing them with sandbags etc. Ok, that’s the studio perspective, but those press guys with their long lenses need stamina, too. And yes, I think that the physical demands of the job are also responsible for the relative small number of women active in it. I also think that women find it hard to get into the profession because men are closing the ranks. They are a tight-knit little group of people, everyone knows everybody else, and I suspect there are prejudices against women prevalent. Oh, I could go on… maybe I’ll do a whole post on the issue of women in the profession at some point. It merits a mention…
      Haha, loved the way you spun out the continuation of the ficlet, Kathy. Oh yes, the plane ride itself is wonderfully stress-inducing, starting with finding your seat, squeezing by those annoying passengers who take aaaages to put their coat into the overhead lockers, then moving into your seat etc…
      “to goose someone” – is that to slap him on the bum, or tickle him from behind? The thought occurred to me, just the way Armitage’s hand is hidden behind Freeman’s back… and RA looking all innocently away… Yeah, just the kind of prank I imagine guys to play on each other.
      Thanks for the suggestion, Kathy – it was quite a challenge, especially the ficlet. I have four different versions in varying lengths on my laptop now 😀 Took me ages to find the right angle 😉

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      • To goose someone is to pinch them, holding their buttocks between your thumb and forefinger, official definition from Urban
        Dictionary. This can be done between friends or relatives, but not with strangers. Gee, I wonder why not? I am glad you enjoyed the challenge, Guylty. It was fun and you did a masterful job of entertaining and educating, as always..

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        • *giggles* Armitage, a gooseberry 😉 I can totally see McTavish doing that to Armitage. (Didn’t Graham pinch Stephen Hunter’s nipples in some clip???) Or vice versa.

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  8. Ladies, thank you for your kind comments! I haven’t been ignoring you but I’ve just finished a four-hour product shoot. Perfume bottles. I am banjaxed. I’ll come to comment later! Xxx

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    • Banjaxed…that is a new one for me 🙂 I learn the best slang from you! You are getting very good at this ficlet thing!

      Don’t shoot me please, I’m just curious here…is there a perceptible difference – to the untrained eye – between meticulous photographic care in shooting versus aggressive post production?

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      • Hehe, glad to supply you with the Irish variant on slang…
        As to your question – I am afraid to say no, there is probably not. When done expertly, post-production can actually convince you of a scenario that was not there when the image was initially shot. I was talking to my client about that today. Take any glossy product shot you see in a magazine or on a billboard. You can be sure that it is actually a composite made from up to 25 (or whatever) individual shots whose details have been merged together in Photoshop.
        It gets a bit more difficult when you are dealing with people in photographs, but as you all know, prettifying them is done anyway, and dropping people into the frame or deleting them is not that difficult.
        Then why do photographers still spend four hours shooting 6 perfume bottles? Because the aim is always to get it “as perfect as possible” in camera, to reduce the amount of Photoshop. The top photographers, btw, usually pay a graphic designer/retoucher to do the post-production work for them. (I wish I could…)

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  9. LOL! Poor Mr. F ,he has no chance with this ambitious and headstrong Mr.Resolving Anger 🙂 Thank you for another informative *ooof*,Guylty!
    PS: pssst..I always thought that the higher guy stares at the “lower areas” of the dark-haired women (there was girl in front of them,right?) Do you cut her out?:) ( *she asks quietly with innocent smile*)

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    • Hehehe, yeah, if RA applied his usual meticulous self to the therapy business, he might have a successful alternative career before him…
      No, I didn’t crop the image – I took it as it was. But there is another version of the scene with the bigger group in it and RA further in the background where he looks down. He could be checking out the pretty brunette, though. And good on him 😀

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  10. Baby oil, sharp implements, icing sugar, screaming babies, oh, my goodness *ggg* Guylty, you are diabolical, and Kathy Jones, you are even eviler! (But when you’re bad, you’re better, right?)
    Can I just make the scenario a whole lot worse and suggest we set it at LAX, which is the most awful airport I have ever had the misery of flying into, beating even Karachi at midnight during a sewage overflow? (Yes, I once got stuck in Karachi, busting, but holding on with all my might.)
    Soon after this pic appeared online a North American fan of The Hobbit wrote a beautiful piece about how she happened to be on the same flight and had the guts to approach RA in the airport and chat with him. Dear, brave, valiant soul. She made so many of our collective fantasies come true. If I can find that story I’ll post the link here in a later comment.
    Guylty, you discuss photographic equipment with such affection. It reminded me of a scene in my newsroom last year, when the company closed some titles and retrenched six photographers. Some of the togs were in tears — not because of being retrenched, as they were all glad to be getting out of there with a swagful of dollars, but because they had to relinquish their company-issued gear. They loved their gear, which had become extensions of their bodies. I’m glad to say they put up a successful fight to buy it and take it into the next stage of their careers.

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    • Oh, LAX… never been through it myself, but seem to remember that RA did? Well he must, if he’s rubbing shoulders in Hollywood… And yes, I read that personal account by the fan, too – really nicely written, I remember squeeing 🙂
      😀 oh yeah, us photographers are in love with our gear. My camera, for instance, has a name. He’s (it’s a he, yes, definitely a trustworthy, reliable, technical male) called Marky Mark. But seriously – they are the tools of our trade, and we must care for them, otherwise we are f*cked. You just can’t switch as easily from camera to camera as a writer can from PC to PC… I am glad to read that the photographers in your publication were allowed to retain their equipment in some shape or form. Hope they found work somewhere else… it’s such a hard market to work in.

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  11. By the way, what is “derp”?

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  12. Thank you for another great *ooof* day Tuesday, I got here in time. Thank you for teaching us the different between photo shoot and press shoot.

    Got to say just love RA’s boots, and yes I would help him tie them back up or maybe untieing would be more fun.

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    • 😀 Hehe, you had your priorities right, this week 😉
      Oh, the boots are lovely. He’s got great taste in boots. Oh, and he has great legs in boots. Yeah, I do wonder why he has not tied the laces… seems a bit slovenly to me 😀

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      • Was this flight landing in Wellington or was it a layover? My thought always was that he was getting on another flight shortly and so didn’t bother to tie the laces since he’d be taking the boots off again anyway

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        • Good point, Cindy… Hm, I always assumed that they landed in Wellington as their final destination. But I am not sure… Maybe someone else knows. Otherwise your assumption makes sense!

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      • Or the inter child in him, you never know. The school I am at it’s not so bad with telling the students to tie there shoes. I think it had to do with the flight and not wanting to tie then untie again. But untied boots so works for him, or maybe me.

        His boot sense is great, he seems to have great boots. Who ever knew I was a boot girl.

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        • Yes , those boots are solid and bit unruly.. just like the owner 😉 (Am I very rude ,Katie? )

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          • Joanne not rude in my book. He can’t be as unruly as my oldest son, wow that room looks like a storm came though it. The other thought I just had is at least we know that he does tie shoes, big problem with my boys just to slip on shoes and never untie them. That would be a big waste of time after all.

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  13. I really loved the nerdy part of this post. Just sayin’ 🙂

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    • Hardware discussion is a benchmark for photographers :-). I keep a stash of photography magazines by my bed. I secretly call that “camera porn”.

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