*ooof*: Pretty or Vacant?

Considering that we have had some interesting news this last week – a new project for Mr A, and the bloopers from the Anglophile interview – all that is missing now is some new photographic imagery to make Guylty happy. In the absence of new drooling material we turn once again to Ms Dunn’s photographic output. Today’s image was suggested by Armitagebesotted.

Dunn armchair 1

What’cha looking at, Armitage?
Richard Armitage in a shot by Sarah Dunn, 2013
TVMoves

Moody, snarky, or just tired? Here we have Mr A posing in an armchair that has popped up again in another of Dunn’s images. Lee Pace almost flows off the chair in this shot . I am quite happy – aesthetically speaking – that Armitage is not. It just makes for a better picture, imho. The armchair (and sitter) are placed at a slight angle to the camera. With his head slightly to his right and his eyes averted, RA is looking downwards. His shoulders and back rest against the back of the armchair. We effectively get a half-profile of the man in what amounts to more or less a head and shoulders portrait of Armitage. The formal attire of our subject – a dark blue jacket and matching waistcoat, light blue knitted tie and crisp white shirt – fits very nicely with the traditional piece of furniture he is moulding his delectable form into. This is a gentleman’s chair – and we can just about imagine our subject sitting in a distinguished gentleman’s club in Central London, reading the Times and sipping languidly on his G&T in between making business deals or discussing world politics with his fellow members. The only thing detracting from that kind of fantasy is the background visible behind the chair – one of those typical photography studio backgrounds.

Do you remember those backdrops from your own school photos or the rare visit to a photographer’s studio? They were ubiquitous in my teens, and I hated them even then. There was something incredibly old-fashioned about those backdrops, no matter which colour they came in. They looked unattractive and dirty to me. The latter comes close to the truth, btw, because that is actually part of the origin of these backdrops. In the early days of photography, photographers were often a travelling enterprise. They went from place to place with their big camera, carrying their “photostudio” with them. This mainly consisted of a large cloth that could be draped and hung-up – usually outside – and in front of which the sitters were then placed and pictured. However, travelling with a large cloth, possibly 10 feet wide, hanging it on dirty walls or on washing lines or between two poles, and countless sitters trudging across the edges of it meant that the photographer could not avoid getting dirt on the thing. The effect that we now call “mottled” was simply the accumulation of dirt on an ex-pristine piece of material. Some photographers saw their backdrop as their characteristic trademark – “only original with the blob of paint in the top right corner”. That is how history explains mottled backdrops. I have worked with a photographer who uses a lot of old processes for his project (wet-plate processing being one of them), and for whom I actually sewed a backdrop made of thick hessian material which we then deliberately dirtied in my studio by emptying the remains of the ash bucket from my fireplace over it. No kidding!

Personal dislike of mottled backdrops aside, this one here fits the colour scheme nicely and matches with the brown leather of the armchair, but I am just not very fond of it here. It situates the scene too clearly in the artificialness of a photo studio. Plus, brown is just not a very attractive colour in my book. However, I must admit that the shade of blue of Armitage’s suit and the mid-brown of armchair and backdrop fit very well together. If we could see more of Armitage’ peeps, it would probably bring out the blue of his iris very nicely.

Dunn armchair 1 sightlinesCompositorially the image is quite interesting: Dunn basically only uses two thirds of the space afforded to her by the frame to picture her sitter. Face and body of Armitage are all in the two thirds on the right. This leaves plenty of space for text, should this image be used by a magazine. I also quite like her direction of the pose: She has made Armitage lean back and slightly downwards to the right. His turned head nicely elongates and exposes (the left side of) his neck to our gaze – a view that is not often shown – and that creates a very nice leading line: The line of where the shirt meets the lapel follows up the neck and then even gets continued along the line of sideburn and headline. Similarly, on the other side, Armitage’s characteristically angular forehead and jaw line continue on down the collar and then along the lapel, creating two parallel lines. This is balanced out by two parallel lines along Armitage’s shoulders and along the back of the chair. In the intersection of all those lines we find… Armitage’s face. Bingo! Nicely arranged, very pleasing to the eye indeed. Oh, and let’s not forget that the turned head also exposes the nape curls… *squees*

The pose itself carries a feeling of vulnerability with it – basically the exposing of a vulnerable part of the body, the neck, where our arteries are. This is a view we do not usually give strangers – but possibly lovers, in front of whom we let our guards down – and hence a feeling of intimacy comes with this pose. This is further enhanced by the facial expression of the sitter, particularly his half-shut eyes carry a suggestive meaning (probably more to do with the act of looking downwards than any other intentional posing). The expression almost looks arrogant – no smile graces his lips, they look very slightly pursed; his left eyebrow looks cocked (but isn’t, it just appears that way because he is looking down and the left eyebrow is higher up in the frame than the right), and his gaze is quite intense and determined. With the hands out of the frame, the viewer inevitably wonders what Armitage is doing. What exactly is he looking at? Why is he leaning back so decidedly? Is he amused or is he annoyed? Is he relaxed or tense? Is he averting his eyes because he is annoyed with *us*, or because there is something much more interesting to be seen on the floor to his right??? The fact that a flurry of questions go through my mind when I look at this image tells me that this is a “good” picture – an image that engages me, that challenges me and that makes me curious. It speaks to me because it leaves me room to interpret and to imagine.

Dunn armchair 1 bwInterestingly, there are two more images available from the same series – a great opportunity to compare the images and scrutinize the effects that are created only by minute differences. Ignoring the monochrome vs. colour (all digital images tend to originate in colour and are only made b/w in post/production) Take this image, for instance, which at first glance seems to be identical with the one that I have just analysed. While the pose is exactly the same, the facial expressions differ. In the b/w version Armitage’s gaze is focussed on something further towards the camera. At the same time, he has knitted his brow, and his expression looks like a frown. Whether it is a frown of anger or of concentration is unclear without having any context here, but for me the colour photograph comes across as less grumpy – even if it is just as ambiguous as the b/w.

Dunn armchair 2– And *yay*, we even have a third shot to compare this with, because another image has surfaced in a Japanese TV magazine that shows Mr A in the same pose, but yet again different. This time he graces us with his gaze, looking right at the camera. He has turned his head slightly back towards the camera (although still not dead-pan), and that means his eyes are now fully open when looking across. While the parallel lines are still the same, and Armitage has virtually not changed his facial expression (apart from opening his peeps), this is my least favourite of the three shots. Armitage’s facial expression looks almost blank to me. It is not closed and he does not look as if he is actively hiding anything, but the look in his eyes is not intense enough to be considered interesting. The absence of a smile does not mean he looks grumpy. Or arrogant. Or annoyed. Or anything, for that matter – it leaves the face strangely vacant. (This, however, could also be due to the lack of strong catch lights in his eyes – possibly caused by a) the fact that this is a scanned image or b) the paper the magazine is printed on. Hard to say without looking at the digital original.) In a way, the empty gaze should be typical for the man who could be described as a “dark horse”. It is just not really flattering, imo, and therefore I prefer even the slightly arrogant look to a vacant look. That way, I know that there is a light on upstairs.

In summary I take a number of interesting insights from this cursory comparison: Considering that there are three versions of virtually the same shot, I find my assumption from last week confirmed – Dunn makes minute adjustments to the pose. That takes a lot of time and care – and much concentration from the sitter as he has to translate direction into the adjusted pose. It may also account for the more “static” feel of her images, as I concluded last week, possibly because it demands a slow, calm way of working. Lastly, I find myself again preferring imagery where RA does *not* look at the camera.

I had a few more things to say on the selection/editing process and work-flow of a photographer, but I’ll leave that for another day in favour of fictionalising the image…

He was tired now, after a long trans-Atlantic flight from New York to London. The porter at  the door was as imposing as ever. “Good evening, Sir. Your room is ready for you. Will you be taking dinner in the Club?” “Yes, Arthur”, he answered, signing his name into the ledger on the mahogany desk in the hall. “Would you like me to take your luggage to your room, Mr Armitage, before you take dinner?” “No, I can take it myself. I think I’ll be retiring to the library before dinner, anyway. Thank you, Arthur.” He turned and headed up the grand staircase to his accustomed room on the second floor.

Fifteen minutes later he was refreshed and correctly attired on his way back down the stairs again. Adjusting his cuffs and waistcoat – this was a tie-only establishment – he walked into the members’ library. He scanned the room. A nice and quiet evening, mid-week,  in the distinguished atmosphere of the grand Victorian mansion. Only a few old codgers were sitting in the comfortable leather armchairs. A couple of past-their-prime politicians were having a hushed conversation by the big bay window out to the street, swaying their whiskies in the cut-glass tumblers. He sighed. Just the right atmosphere to wind down after a day of travelling. A couple of armchairs in the back of the dark, wood-panelled room were empty. He grabbed today’s issue of the Times from a sideboard and headed for the leather fauteuil that was in front of the Velvet-curtained double-door leading to the dining room.

A waiter dressed in black tails appeared out of nowhere and quietly asked for his orders. “A glass of Spätburgunder, please”, he carefully enunciated the vowels of the strange German word, already imagining the rich red wine flowing in luscious sips over his taste buds and down his throat. He sighed contentedly. As anachronistic as a Gentlemen’s Club might seem in the 21st century, the old boys certainly knew what they were doing when they had invented these establishments. And it was so convenient, being a member of a club. Not only could he escape life for a quiet hour at the member’s bar anytime he needed a break from London, the club also provided bedrooms for members who were from out of town and needed a place for the night. Much preferable to the exchangeable sterility of an anonymous hotel. Besides, he did not want to impose on his London friends and oblige them into putting him up for the night.

He wriggled his bum discretely into the soft leather of the armchair and leaned back with closed eyes, exhaling softly. “I say, I know your face, don’t I?”, a raspy, dark voice with an unmistakable Eastern accent dragged him out of his lazy musings. His unamused gaze fell onto a fellow member of roughly his age, tall and darkly handsome, who had carefully folded himself into the empty armchair in front of his. “Good evening. I don’t know we are acquainted?”, he said suppressing his irritation and forcing a polite smile onto his face. “Viktor Sanowitz, entrepreneur”, the stranger mirthlessly smiled at him. Since when did the Club allow bespectacled, unsavoury Russian oligarchs into its midst? The days of the Empire were obviously long gone.

“How do you do?” he forced through clenched teeth. There was his quiet pre-dinner wind-down gone. “Yes. – I know you from the Television. You are Richard Armitage.” There we go. He was going to have to play the actor now. “Indeed.” “Tell me, what do you think of Russia reasserting its right in the Crimea?” He nearly choked on the sip of Spätburgunder that the attentive waiter had served him. “Politics? I am afraid I am not up-to-date on that”, he waved the question aside, “who wants to know my opinion on anything, anyway?” “Very well, a tricky topic, I agree. Well, tell me about your celebrity lifestyle then. You must be invited to many parties.” “I’m afraid not. I am rather boring.” “Don’t actors party all the time?” “Not really my scene.” He tried to be as monosyllabic as possible. “What about all the other celebrities?” “I don’t really go out much.” “Well, what are the perks of being a sought-after actor these days?” He sighed. “I don’t know.” “Do you not get many freebies? Designer clothes? Free holidays? Surely, a free upgrade to Business Class when you travel?” He emphatically shook is head “No. Hasn’t happened to me.”

The business man smiled maliciously. “Your life sounds boring.” His contrariness was finally piqued. His life was far from boring, but he was not willing to share details from neither his professional nor his private life with an offensive stranger. Discretion was his middle name. But he couldn’t help but push it that last little bit. “Oh, I have fans, groupies. Many interested ladies? A whole Army, in fact.” The stranger was literally drooling now. “I am all ears”, the Russian pushed. “Are they all Armitage-besotted?” A chuckle involuntarily escaped Armitage’s lips. Now, there was a topic he had lots to say on… If only the dry Russian knew. He had stories to tell that would make the insufferable twat gag and turn green with envy. He slowly leaned back in his armchair with a satisfied smile on his lips. Nonchalantly  he turned his head to the side and sneakily directed his gaze to the floor. “Yes. But a gentleman never tells…”

~ by Guylty on March 18, 2014.

47 Responses to “*ooof*: Pretty or Vacant?”

  1. I love these photos – perfectly arranged! Thank you for the appreciating oof, guylty! And for the ficlet, as usual perfectly fitting and entertaining ;). Lol: I’d love to hear him say “Spätburgunder”!

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    • I have to say I prefer the b/w versions of the images to the colour ones. Not just because I dislike the colour brown, but because I think they’d look classier.
      I think Mr Armitage should expand wine preferences to some classy German reds :-D. And learn some German as he goes along.

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  2. Well, I guess he could be vacantly pretty or prettily vacant. I like the picture because he is seems to be relaxing while maintaining a wrinkle-free posture in immaculate attire with not a hair out of place. So is he really as relaxed as the pose suggests? Not to me, he is entirely too tidy and perfect. I am discounting the casual stubble because it appears in so many of his shots, by now it’s sort of an expected look for him. I did not notice his neck until you kindly directed my worshipful gaze there, and thank you. It is a thing of beauty just like the rest of him. Loved the ficlet and the way you worked Armitage Besotted into it. Clever girl!

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    • “Wrinkle-free posture”, “immaculate attire”, “worshipful gaze” – your comment had me in stitches, Kathy :-). No, I do not think he is as relaxed as the pose suggests. Posing is hard work – especially when you are not a pro. But well, he *is* an actor, so I am sure he can concentrate and do what he is asked to do.
      And yes, Armitagebesotted had to come into the *ooof*let in some shape or form :-). I had great difficulty with the *ooof*let because I read a great little drabble that was just so good, I can not ever top it. Unfortunately I cannot find the link to it – it was on tumblr. (Oh, and it was very very NSFW :-D) But well, a challenge is a challenge…

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  3. “A gentleman never tells.” Honestly, he could put that on his business card :). Dunn captures that exposed neck and jaw so beautifully…erm…sorry, lost my train of thought.

    There is a almost stop action quality to them when viewed consecutively that I find interesting too.

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    • Dark Horse Armitage. Annoyingly so. Or intriguingly so??? Probably the latter 😀
      I have a thing for exposed neck tendons – probably because I very consciously always keep mine hidden. (I sometimes wonder whether I was beheaded in an earlier life – I just really am freaky when it comes to exposing my neck…)
      It’s great when there is a series of images available from a shoot. Not only do they work as a stop-motion-sequence, but they kind of allow a glimpse into the actual process of the shoot. Or the selection process.

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  4. I love those photos too but it’s true, the last one is very unsatisfying when it should be a bonus to see his eyes.

    This is going to expose a very dirty secret of mine but in that first, gorgeous shot he looks like an arrogant hero from a Georgette Heyer novel, before he has been humanised by falling in love with the heroine (i.e me) 😉
    He should be wearing a cravat of course but the suit and tie are pretty elegant.

    Lovely ficlet as always Guylty though I don’t think that Russian would last long in a good Gentleman’s Club! Intrusive questioning in the library? He’d be out on his ear…

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    • I never saw the connection to a Victorian hero, but yes, there is an air if arrogance there. That can be quite intriguing. Or shall we say challenging 😉
      I can’t say that I love these pictures, but the one where we can’t see his eyes makes my imagination run wild. Hence the ludicrous *ooof*let 😀 And you are right, such riff-raff would be kicked out of the club straight away…

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  5. Oh, I hope he has strong opinons about the Crimea and he woudn’t be afraid of voicing them especially in the presence of unknown Russian oligarch.
    Thanks for this *ooof* and ficlet,Guylty 🙂 I love this new (for me)
    monochrome photo. I like his frown… and those lips curled in disgust.(?)
    *squeee*

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  6. Fascinating to read as always, thank you. (: I have to say I didn’t find this photograph particularly interesting until you explained how the composition works in it. Very insightful for me! Maybe someday I’ll learn to pay attention to the composition because my attention is usually caught by the subject itself, colours and light and shadow. The ficlet was also great!

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    • Welcome!

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    • To tell you the truth, Quutamo – sometimes I have to look quite hard myself to find the composition lines, or anything I want to write about :-D. This was not a particular favourite of mine, although I very much feel intrigued by the look on his face. And you are right – subject, colour, light/shadow are usually the obvious, in-your-face characteristics of an image. The more often you study photographs, the more sensitive you become to the rules of composition, though.
      Thanks for commenting 🙂

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      • I thought that after lurking for three months I could start to leave a comment once in a while. For me there just isn’t that “something” in this photograph to hold my interest for very long so it’s very interesting to read what people see in this.

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        • Yay – I am chuffed my *ooof* has made you de-lurk 😉 Please continue commenting – we don’t bite! And I have to say that I miss the “something” in most of Dunn’s images – her style is just not my thing.

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  7. This is the first time I think I’ve ever dissented, Guylty!! I love the color, full face shot. While last week’s ladder hanger left me thinking of a mannequin, this color shot is of a man, the end of the party, guests are FINALLY leaving, he lies back against the chair, hosting/acting duties completed, and that look says (without saying a word) wine, bed, sex, perhaps not in that order, and the significant other sitting across from him shifts in their seat in agreement.

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    • Haha, like it, Carly. Sounds legit – the end of a party, now on to the really good bit. 😀 You should’ve written that ficlet instead of me. (Maybe I should get over my prudishness and introduce a bit of racy raunch into this… :-D)
      Yeah, not quite my favourite. I prefer Dunn’s b/w work, especially the divine gaze in leather. But hey, there’s RA in this, so it’ll do 😉

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  8. Guilty:

    Thank you thank you thank you!!! I’m beyond thrilled to figure into one of your ficlets. You totally made my day!

    Thank you for using the photo I requested, despite that it didn’t jazz you. Personally, that image makes me want to have at his neck and help him lose the 1980s tie. Guess we all have our triggers.

    Thanks, too, for working my screen name into the “plot.” I squealed out loud when I got to that!

    Also, my inner copy editor thanks you for adding the hyphen to armitage-besotted. (For the uninitiated, the hyphen makes the two words into a compound modifier of the noun/subject, which is implied, in this case: “me.”) Stickler for punctuation that I am, I wanted that hyphen in my screen name from the get-go, but the interface at the fan site where I first registered (C19) wouldn’t let me put it in. (I’m still struggling to make my peace with internet-forced illiteracy.)

    Are you also responding slyly to my dissenting comment elsewhere about his “boring” life? You clever girl.

    CarlyQ: Write your version of this story, too! I want to hear the ending! Post it at one of the fan fiction sites soon, please. I can wait a few weeks. Ha ha ha.

    My last thought: I’ve been casting around in my mind for a discrete AA/fan/well-wisher identifier since RA threw out the challenge in one of his DOS interviews. (Beards = NOT.) Perhaps it should be a small button that reads “A Gentleman Never Tells?”

    Love, love, love, this, thanks again.

    AB

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    • Ha ha ha 🙂 You’re sweet!

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    • You are very welcome, AB – as I said to you behind the scenes: It was a challenge. I just can’t get that other drabble out of my head, and that was responsible for me faffing around and writing my *ooof*let at the very last minute (the photography part of it was written on Monday and ready to be published at 9 am GMT Tuesday morning… The *ooof*let was a real labour of love…
      I am glad you approve of my hyphenation of your name. I am pedantic about grammar and spelling, too (although I get it wrong all the time – non-native speaker), and it sometimes drives me mental when screen names are obscured by computer rules 😦
      I wish I could claim that I had been surreptitiously responding to your comment re. his boring life, but I do not know what you are referring to… That was simply me being cheeky (although Mr A has said on several occasions that his life is boring, so I take it from the horse’s mouth).
      Lastly – a discrete fan identifier – oh, yes, we have a need for that. And boy, your suggestion would be VERY discrete. I wonder whether *anyone* would cop on… We need to flood the market with those badges 🙂

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  9. Not certain about this, but I haven’t seen the actor as a naturally warm complexioned person, and have not been drawn to backgrounds or clothes in more “autumn” coloured photos. There does seem, to me not so much authenticity. (and notwithstanding probably/possibly not natural dark hair, but the eye

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    • I have to agree with you Fitzg – RA is always pale and untanned. Even while filming SB in Namibia he did not seem to tan much. (Dead give-away for the dyed black hair!) His complexion is quite “British Isles”, if not positively IRISH *haha* – particularly with the dyed black hair he has *the* classic Irish look (contrary to popular belief they are not freckled red-heads but have dark, almost black hair and blue eyes!). Anyhow, I also do not like the browny colour range for him.

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  10. This was just what I needed to read after my own less than relaxing day. Thanks!

    Is the point of what you call the “vacant” look precisely what is supposed to be one of his charms as crush object — the possibility of writing any story onto his exterior?

    I guess i like the last photo best as well, I think because I find this particular version of the Armitage lowered glance in photos 1 and 2 very uninteresting, without tension — I don’t wonder what he’s looking at because he looks so bored, maybe?

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    • I am not sure whether the vacant look is really an *intentional* point or a by-product of a session with a slightly reserved model and a possible lack of connection between subject and photographer (complete conjecture here – for all I know Dunn and RA could have had the best rapport ever, who knows). But the effect of it *can* be what you describe – a vacant look can be “an empty slate” which enables the viewer to read something into it. What I find *extremely* interesting in Mr A’s physiognomy is the fact that he can give the impression that he is smiling when he effectively is NOT. The image discussed here is another one of those examples – my first impression upon seeing the image was that he had a tiny smile in/around his eyes and mouth. But when I look closely, the corners of his mouth are not turned up, and his eyes are not smiling either. I am not sure whether this is a trick of *my* mind – because I *want* to see him smile – or whether this is something physiological. Do other people see this, too? It has certainly occurred to me in other shots, too. (I think I have written about it in a previous *ooof* somewhere, too.)
      Interesting how different we perceive the images. I like the two off-gaze images much more interesting, precisely because I perceive tension in *them* – the tension of hiding something (his eyes = his thoughts) – whereas the gaze at the camera does not hold any suspense for me. The eyes are nice to look at, but the facial expression is so empty, it looks like a mask.
      Personal opinion, of course!

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  11. Oh my, this is so much about our own wishes, isn’t it? I read the third photo (which I love) as “Okay, I will stop being coy now and look right at you, girl.” I think his eyes look lazy and inviting in that shot, not bored. What does that say about my needs? Ha ha ha!

    And while I’m at it, glad you’re here Servetus, you sartorial pro, because something else just occurred to me, and we need you to weigh in on it. Is that jacket from the Wellington premiere suit? The color, the quality of the fabric, the way the points of the lapels go higher than the collar, the button hole in the left lapel (visible in two of the shots.)

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  12. servetus, I got carried away on some things in my response. If this is a bad response, I felt no impetus to imprint my “desires” on this representation. I do prefer the 2nd last photo B/W. It does not, however, move me Unfortunately, none of them do..

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    • This was not directed at me, but just to say: I don’t think there are “bad responses”. If you are unmoved, you are unmoved. You did have reasons for that – all pretty valid, I think. I can also say that the Dunn images are certainly not among my all-time favourites…

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  13. He looks bored, but sexy. How does he do that? I just looked up and saw that Servetus thinks that could also be the case. I have yet to really read the comments. I will take bored and sexy, works for me.

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    • Nonchalance can be quite attractive *ggg* – effortless, arrogant, confident. Unmoved by what goes on around him. Almost expecting the admiration to flow his way. (Although all of that does not sound genuinely Armitage to me…) But hey, if bored-sexy is all there is, I’ll take bored-sexy over no-sexy any time *ggg*

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  14. Aahh, I remember these awful backdrops from my teen and early family life´s photos, too. And I felt a sudden disturbing shudder as I realized that the backdrop of this pic looks exactly the same like the backdrop on my wedding photos, and my ex-husband wore a similar but ruby-colured tie 😦
    So its natural, that I prefer the b/w one… the little frown on his forehead *ooof*
    To the professional point of view: I like it how you point out the composition, the symmetric lines in it, my untrained eyes would never have detect that, fascinating…
    But the icing on the cake is still the ficlet: How I´ld love to hear Mr. A pronouncing “Spätburgunder”, might be not too difficult. Yes, we should send him an exquisite case of wine 🙂

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    • Sorry to have triggered some bad memories there :-D.
      Yeah, I like imagining RA trying to get his tongue around the German language. With his knowledge of Khuzdul behind him, he might even get the /ch/ and /rrrrrrrr/ right. “shpateboorgoonda, Mr Armitage, try that!”

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  15. I know what you mean, Guylty. Actually, I love him with dark hair, but the warm-hued clothing and autumn background just don’t work. 🙂 Not certain the actor can do accents, either – except Northern English or RP ones! We’ll see with Into the Storm 🙂 (Don’t see why he should, actually, the voice itself is sufficient to make one forget he is not American or Canadian….)

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    • Into the storm will be the litmus test for compatibility with the American market. I was not quite convinced by “these bunsss”, but “bejaysus” was pretty good. Let’s see how Leeds fares in the Armitage mouth. 😀

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  16. Ex-pristine. *snort* I might just find myself saying that now. 😉

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  17. Ouch and “snort” too, Alyssa. Now I have to go dust my bookcases? (Yup, I suppose they need it 🙂 First thing in the morning.

    I thought that bejaysus word was supposed to be Irish? (Like begorrah?) Loved your analysis of portraits, as always. Some photographers are better than others. We need the comparisons. Thanks.

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    • Yup, bejaysus is meant to be Irish (context: the interviewer points out that her surname is Irish. That’s when he quips “Ah, Bejaysus” – nicely flat!)
      In the absence of new material I can see a few comparisons coming up…

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  18. Gorgeous portraits! And I don’t mind RA’s looking away in these portraits here. But I do love when he looks “through” the camera lens. Sighhh! Interesting info about the photographer’s artistic choices. And love the fan fic! Delightful!

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    • Interesting – I always get almost uncomfortable when RA looks through the lens… Too close for comfort??? Embarrassed that he might read my mind. (Whatever he may find there… *smirks*)
      Glad you like the fun little *ooof*let. Thanks for commenting! x

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  19. […] and deliberately colour-drained. Watch out for her focus on the eyes. ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof ooof […]

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