Richard Armitage, overly

Proud or arrogant. From Middle English "wenen," to think or imagine. Richard Armitage as John Thornton in episode 1 of North & South. Source: RichardArmitageNet.com

Proud or arrogant. From Middle English “wenen,” to think or imagine. Richard Armitage as John Thornton in episode 1 of North & South. Source: RichardArmitageNet.com

~ by Servetus on February 19, 2017.

16 Responses to “Richard Armitage, overly”

  1. I’m loving this series, Servetus!

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  2. takes the notebook and writes another one in

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    • If you want to intensify it you can also say “overweening pride,” which is redundant in meaning but which one runs across a fair amount in written English.

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  3. mmm…my favorite!

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  4. Sieht so aus, als sei es verwandt mit dem deutschen “wähnen” (=irrtümlich annehmen, fälschlicherweise glauben; Beispiele: sich überlegen wähnen, sich im Recht wähnen [mir fallen nur Beispiele mit negativem Unterton ein, negativer, als der Irrtum sowieso beinhaltet]).

    Ist da im Englischen ein Irrtum impliziert? Schwingt da was Negatives mit?

    PS: Ich mag deinen Sprachunterricht. gg

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    • in middle English wenen was not negatively laden but in this case it is now. In general the prefix “over” is somewhat negatively connotated in English (overexcited, overtired, overinvolved, overused, etc.).

      Thanks 🙂

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  5. I have always loved when reading to have a dictionary near just incase there comes a word in a phrase that I do not understand, however, most you can judge by the sentence and surrounding writing.

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    • something that I find funny is that after I look up a word for the first time, I suddenly start noticing it everywhere.

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  6. ah, nice to learn a new one from the English vocabulary where i always feel i never come even close to doing the beauty of the language true justice! And looking at that picture always makes me burst out in giggles 🙂

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  7. Oh, I really love your vocabulary posts ❤

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