OK, after the fifth view I have to get this off my mind [minor spoilers]

Dear Sandra Bullock,

I really admire your acting in German in this film. I understand that you’re a half-native speaker (what the profis sometimes call a heritage speaker) and it shows. As someone who learned most of her German as an adult, I’ve always been envious of people in your position.

Just one thing: the gender of “Schrank” is male (der Schrank). So in your discussion of your “husband” putting his shoes in the freezer, it should be “in den Gefrierschrank” and not “ins Gefrierschrank.”

(Well, unless “Schrank” is one of those nouns that changes gender depending on where you are in Germanophone Europe. Like, I know Swabians say “der Butter.” So I dunno, maybe people in Nürnberg say “das Schrank”?)

Incidentally, your “husband” may not be as crazy as you think he is. Freezing your shoes is a great idea if they smell, or if you want to stretch them out / break them in quickly.

I love the way you say “Wahnsinn. WAHNSINN!” Well done! Everyone in the cinema today LOLed.

Mit freundlichen Grüßen

Servetus

~ by Servetus on June 13, 2018.

28 Responses to “OK, after the fifth view I have to get this off my mind [minor spoilers]”

  1. Enrsthaft? Der Butter? (Gibsch mer de Budda?) 😂

    Like

    • For some reason “Butter” is a word that has variable gender outside of High German. There are several but it’s the one I always remember.

      Like

      • Ist wohl wohl nie so aufgefallen, da der Artikel so schwäbisch vernuschelt wird. Aber ja, jetzt wo ich es klingen lasse erscheint es mir auch männlich. Naja, „der Aufstrich“ ist ja auch thematisch nicht weit entfernt …..

        Like

        • Here’s a map of varying usages and a discussion of how the gender was originally formed. https://german.stackexchange.com/questions/8259/der-die-das-butter

          When you see the film, listen for this part. She uses the same expression twice (“puts his shoes in the freezer”). The first time it sounds like a “Vernuschelung,” you can’t really tell which article she’s using. The second time she says “ins Gefrierschrank” for sure. If that were me, I’d explain it as — she’s improvising, and the first time she says it she realizes that (a) it’s an accusative and (b) she isn’t sure of the gender of Schrank. Then the second time, she decides to use the accusative for the neuter.

          My German teacher in the US (who was from Berlin) always said, if you don’t know the gender and you can’t mumble it, pick “der.” It’s numerically the most common.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Denn auch hier gilt: Das Patriachat lebt! 😏

            Like

            • LOL!

              Like

              • In dem Zusammenhang fällt mir ein: Mein Ex erzählte immer, dass alle Mädchennamen in seiner nordhessischen Heimat mit S beginnen: s‘Claudia, s‘Andrea etc. Muss ich heute noch drüber grinsen …. Phonetisch anspruchsvoll wird’s bei (z.B.) s‘Susan. Aber die geübte Zunge packt auch den Doppelkonsonanten, indem sie sich einen kurzen Absetzer gönnt 😂

                Liked by 1 person

                • is that because it’s “das Mädchen”? That could be hard to manage. (It always used to confuse me — Geht’s dem Mädchen gut? Ihm ist nicht gut. Admittedly, that was in the textbook. I’m not sure I ever heard anyone actually say that out loud.)

                  Like

                  • Genau: das Mädchen. War ja schon bei Mark Twain der Lacher: die Runkelrübe, aber das Mädchen 😂

                    Liked by 1 person

                  • Wenn ich mich richtig erinnere, werden alle Verkleinerungsformen mit “das” gebildet: der Baum – das Bäumchen, die Biene – das Bienchen…
                    Jetzt bin ich mir nur nicht sicher, von welchen Nomen “Mädchen” die Verkleinerung ist. Vielleicht von “Maid” (junge Frau)?

                    Liked by 1 person

                    • Wow Elanor! Bin allermaximalst beeindruckt. Darüber habe ich in meinem ganzen Leben noch nieeee nachgedacht. Klingt superschlüssig. Mal sehen, was unsere Expertin jenseits des Atlantik dazu weiß. Mein Bildungsakku blinkt…..

                      Liked by 2 people

                    • … von welchem Nomen…
                      … die Verkleinerung welchen Nomens (?) “Mädchen” ist…
                      Schnöde Tippfehler lassen grüßen.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • yes, that’s exactly right (and this is something I think you only learn formally if you study German as a foreign language; Germans never make gender errors but for those of us with native languages without gender, we have to be taught how to recognize or guess the gender of an unfamiliar noun, and that’s one of the general rules). In Frühneuhochdeutsch it’s “Magd,” though. I’d have to look it up to check further than that.

                      Liked by 2 people

                    • also nouns ending in -lein.

                      Like

                    • Jetzt, wo du das sagst, fällt es mir auch auf. 🙂
                      Gute Güte, der reinste Volkshochschulkurs hier.

                      Liked by 1 person

                • Ergänzung für‘s Protokoll: der Doppelkonsonant speziell beim S 😉

                  Liked by 1 person

  2. Ersetzte „wohl wohl“ durch „mir“ 🤣 ich liebe selbsttätige Kommentare!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ich fang mal hier unten neu an.
    Im Englischen hat man die Probleme mit der sprachlichen Gleichberechtigung nicht in dem Maße, in dem sie zur Zeit in Deutschland diskutiert wird. Es ist zum Teil sehr anstrengend, umständlich und unelegant, sich “geschlechtsneutral” auszudrücken. Wo es früher hieß: die Politiker, schreibt man heute: die Politikerinnen und Politiker… sperrig.
    Aber das Deutsche ist, wie Merry schon sagte, sehr von männlichen Ausdrucksformen geprägt.
    Es hat mich schon als Kind genervt, dass er einerseits “herrlich” heißt, aber man andererseits auch “dämlich” sein kann. Ganz zu schweigen von “man”.
    Frau fühlt sich benachteiligt.

    Like

    • I remember from my Göttingen days that you had to write “StudentInnen” or “Studierende.” We do have some issues like that — like there are people who angry if you say “police officer,” for instance.

      Like

      • Was wäre denn hier die korrekte weibliche Form?
        “Studierende” geht ja noch, aber das ist eher eine positive Ausnahme.

        Like

        • I think people said “die StudentInnen” but it’s been a long time. of course, that does sound the same as “die Studentinnen”. The professors who led our research group hated “Studierende” but they had all been born before the war.

          Like

          • Das war ein Missverständnis. Ich wollte nach der korrekten weiblichen Form für “police officer” fragen 🙂
            Die Sache mit den Studierenden, Lernenden oder auch LehrerInnen (mit einem großen “I” für die weibliche Form innerhalb eines Wortes!) wird momentan heiß diskutiert.
            Dabei finde ich die Tatsache, dass über Gleichberechtigung im sprachlichen Bereich nachgedacht wird, grundsätzlich gut. Durch die hauptsächlich männlich geprägte Ausdrucksweise wird Mädchen und Frauen unterschwellig immer verdeutlicht, dass dies eine Männerwelt ist, in der sie erst mal nicht viel zu suchen haben. Man redet von Ärzten, von Piloten und Astronauten, vom Chef der Firma und von der Mannschaft – nix für Mädchen. Wenn man sie einschließen will, gibt es nur (gefühlt) umständliche Ausdrucksweisen. Ich verwende gerade bei Berufsbezeichnungen manchmal bewusst einfach nur die weibliche Form, was dann sehr auffällt, weil sie nicht als allgemeiner Ausdruck wahrgenommen wird (im Gegensatz zur männlichen, bei der das angeblich so ist).

            Like

            • oh, sorry! “police officer” is the new neutral of “policeman”, similarly “firefighter” for previous usage “fireman,” “chair” as the replacement for “chairman.” There never were female designations for these occupations.

              What I always say to people: if you use the new term, you will get used to it and it will seem entirely normal. If you think you can’t become accustomed to a new word for something you claim already exists, than you should ask yourself what your own difficulty is.

              Liked by 1 person

            • I guess maybe people said “policewoman,” but it was a thing that existed mostly on TV anyway.

              Like

  4. DAS hab ich auch sofort gehört und ich denke mal, dass das ein Versprecher war.
    Ansonsten liebe ich es, wenn Sandra Bullock Deutsch spricht und man die alte Heimat (Nürnberch 🙂 ) heraushört. Das war im Film für mich nur vor der Toilette mit den beiden Securities zu hören, ansonsten klang sie recht dialektneutral 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • In the meantime I heard that she had her Franconian cousins check out her lines, so I’m guessing you’re right. I honestly didn’t read her as Franconian, but as southern German more generally. And I lived in Erlangen for a year, but my memory is obviously fading.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Heard that too.
        My regular doctor for more than 30 years (and his wife) are Franconians so I heard this a lot over the years.
        Plus my mother listens to an Bavarian radio station on a daily basis and they have Franconian DJ’s too and I really love this dialect

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

 
%d bloggers like this: