Next, I would like Richard Armitage’s gravy instructions

https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

Ghost of Christmas Past: Gravy reference.

~ by Servetus on December 17, 2018.

34 Responses to “Next, I would like Richard Armitage’s gravy instructions”

  1. He should have a cooking channel on You Tube…I’d watch the heck out of it!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • you’ve seen this interview, right?

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have! It’s one of my faves, actually. I get the feeling he eats out a lot…! That’s why I think it would be hilarious to see him actually try to cook on camera sometime…!

        Like

        • There was an interview where he said he cooked the same thing over and over again.

          http://www.thesqueee.co.uk/eating-like-richard-armitage-salmon-with-couscous-tomatoes/

          but if Japanese is still his favorite cuisine I imagine he does eat out a lot — making sushi isn’t really the kind of thing you do for yourself. (or most of us wouldn’t)

          Like

          • Sushi is easy but easier in large quantities

            Like

            • I don’t think the technique is that difficult, but I’m just thinking of the shopping. Even if I go and have a total blowout at my local Japanese restaurant, even if I order sashimi, I’m really not eating very much fish. So you’d have to go to the fishmonger, and then order microscopic amounts of say four different fish. Or cook (say) three shrimp or something., which is kind of a pain.

              Liked by 1 person

              • oh, i kinda forget about fish-that sounds weird-but what i mean is that i’ve only ever made vegetarian sushi because my OH is veggie. So yeah you’re right because it’s important to buy the freshest fish possible-which isn’t that easy

                Like

                • LOL. Yeah, for me vegeterian sushi is something you order to fill out the plate. It’s all about the fish. We have two pretty good sushi restaurants here, but the fish is fedexed in from the fish markets on the coasts. It’s kind of an environmental disaster.

                  Like

  2. LOVE Christmas pudding!! Have it every year and usually buy a UK made one from our local British store. Have it with a sweet white sauce or for those familiar with it, Bird’s custard. Wonderful!

    Like

    • I like it, but it’s not really part of our traditional Christmas meal here. We almost always have pie at Christmas dinner — mincemeat, pumpkin and hickory nut for sure. The specifically German American things like stollen are usually cookies / afternoon sweets items. My exSO’s mother always made a red wine gelée with cherries in it.

      Like

  3. We love plum pudding too. Bought, not homemade. Then my hubby does a hard sauce, which is basically just sugar, butter, and rum. Yum!
    Interesting that The Christmas Hirelings is only available on Audible US. Not available at Audible Canada. Audible UK has Jennifer Saunders narrating it. Maybe US is where his narrations have the most sales. I ordered it on Audible US, so I guess if I change market places on the app, I should be able to listen.

    Like

    • probably anything would taste great with hard sauce on it, lol.

      I think maybe Jennifer Saunders is a bigger name in the UK than he is (French & Saunders and all that)

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yeah, and Absolutely Fabulous. I love that show. So funny.

        Liked by 2 people

      • yeah, it sounds horrible but everyone knows who Jennifer Saunders is because of her long comedy career with Dawn French (and usually hilarious xmas specials) and Ab Fab. I watched The Hobbit when it came out and Hannibal and I only heard the name Richard Armitage 4 months ago ducks to avoid being slapped over the head (and when i mention his to people they tend to only know him when i bring up a few of his roles -the problem of being a good actor i fear is that he is his roles rather than a personality)

        Liked by 1 person

        • I think he might have had better name recognition in the UK ten years ago when RH and Spooks were running simultaneously, but he hasn’t done anything there since SB. Out of sight, out of mind.

          Liked by 1 person

    • kind of bitter for the UK fans, though.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Why have I listened to it multiple times?! 😂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. My mom used to make Christmas pudding every year with lots of red and green candied cherries in it (no alcohol though, she was a real teetotaller), everyone had to stir the pot once for luck. Tradition. But, she steamed it first, then aged it. She served it with warm white sauce made with milk, flour and sugar and butter. I loved the sauce but hated the pudding as a child. I would give anything to have her homemade pudding now though.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’m wondering why he’s so squeamish about the beef suet. I had to take a moment to look it up in order not to spread information accidentally, but as I remembered, it’s just beef fat. It’s not dried drippings or whatever. Or maybe UK chefs use something else.

    Like

    • It’s a hard fat. I think his squeamishness comes from probably being a bit of a health nut (in order to keep us interested in all those shirtless scenes) and I also thinks he has the basics of the pudding making down but not quite the specifics.

      Liked by 1 person

    • i think anybody who bothers making their own xmas pud these days ( i think not that many people) use something called Attora instead which is vegetable suet. I get the feeling he’s never made xmas pud-it’s just a silly segment they did to highlight his Britishness

      Liked by 1 person

      • interesting. Tbh I don’t know if you can buy beef suet in a supermarket here these days. I think you can buy it at a butchers. The primary use of suet I am familiar with is in bird feeders.

        Like

      • I’m planning on making a gingerbread Christmas pudding this year, which fortunately is completely dried fruit and suet free! But it is steamed…so that’s something! It calls for an orange hard sauce but as I have people in the family with alcohol issues, I’ll be making an alcohol-free sauce…Hopefully it’ll be as delish as the recipe Richard describes…!

        Liked by 2 people

  7. I bet he remembers ‘stir up Sunday’, when his mum would make a Christmas pudding it’s what most people in the UK did before everyone was too busy.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. It really his recipe or just joking around! I would love to try it but without alcohol. It’s like fruit cake only cooked.

    Like

    • I think it’s a general description of how you make it more than a recipe. A non-alcoholic version would somehow have to deal with all that dry fruit — the main reason for the alcohol is to rehydrate the dried fuirt (and then keep it safe while it’s ripening)

      Like

  9. I love the way he says health and safety❤️
    It does taste really good despite all the dried fruit which isn’t so dry after vast amounts of alcohol are poured into it. Then a brandy butter is spread on the cake. Ready to est. Yummy.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

 
%d bloggers like this: