And yet there are competing train wrecks to watch today

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~ by Servetus on April 11, 2019.

35 Responses to “And yet there are competing train wrecks to watch today”

  1. At least we aren’t crashing out on Friday… 🙄

    Liked by 1 person

    • Indeed. I was kind of surprised when I walked out of my evening appointment and it was on the radio that there’d been such a long extension. Let’s hope they don’t spend it all the way they’v spent the last two plus years.

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  2. I take it as GOOD news. I wish he had been a little more contemplative .. explained more how he felt about the 6 month extension.. fitting on Halloween IMO..

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  3. Look, I get that relentless cheer is your shtick and it’s never been mine. I prefer to be realistic. However, for the sake of argument, what exactly is good about this beyond the very short term? The Leavers were and are outraged. They are chewing up the Tories from the inside. The Remainers are still not getting what they wanted and Corbyn (pro-Leave) is still at odds with his party (which is pro-second-referendum), which isn’t getting to express what most of it wants. The UK is limbo for up to another ten months. There will be a breath for Easter, then Parliament will come back and start fighting again about whether they can make a deal (which may continue to be impossible even though Labour is involved, as the parties disagree fundamentally about the customs union question and this has always been one May’s “red lines”). There still is unlikely to be another referendum. Meanwhile no one in the UK can make any decisions because they don’t know what’s happening when whatever happens happens. The uncertainty eats away at the economy, hiring, life decisions, the job markets, the pound sterling. This limbo situation is good for no one. It just means there won’t be a colossal snafu today, right before the Easter break begins in Europe and everyone starts moving around. They all kicked the can down the road because nobody — not just May, not just the opposition, not just the EU — really knows what to do. This is the sign of a huge policy failure all over Europe.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I guess I need something positive to look at right now when in my real life and some events that happened earlier this week have made me feel pretty low. Yeah in the long term Brexit will probably happen but don’t you think if the EU wanted UK out they would not have given the 6 month extension? I’m just looking as an ignorant outsider and it is a colossal shit show even beyond Trump and Putin love fest here and that in 18 months I fear will be repeat for the US. I get what you mean believe me I do but I’m been negative for too long now so I try to remain positive and upbeat for my own sanity.

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      • Of course the EU doesn’t want the UK out, but they also have to follow their own rules, and the UK started this, so any policy change in that direction would have to come from the UK. (E.g., if there were a general election, which would necessitate new party programs, which the Tories are eager to avoid and Labour would not be that excited about either.) Assuming that the UK wants out, which is what all the leadership of the UK is saying, then it is not in the EU interest to extend the situation indefinitely. They granted the extension so that they don’t have a sudden situation where all the borders close and food is rotting on trucks in Calais.

        Liked by 2 people

        • En tout cas, la liste de médicaments essentiels, pour lesquels les pharmacies manquent d’approvisionnement, continue à s’allonger. Il y a des manque-fabriquant mais aussi des contingentements.
          Il faut appeler les grossistes répartiteurs, au téléphone, plusieurs fois par jour (grosse perte de temps et d’énergie). Il faut quémander, argumenter, défendre la cause ds malades, pour être éventuellement livrés au compte goutte, boîte après boîte.
          Comme exemples, je cite: cortisoniques, adrénaline contre les chocs anaphylactiques, anti tuberculeux, anti épileptiques, anti parkinsoniens, anti lymphome, collyre anti glaucomateux…Pour certains produits, il n’y a pas d’alternative.
          Il faut gérer les délivrances en privilégiant tel ou tel malade. C’est du jamais vu, depuis mes débuts en 1987. C’est un crêve le coeur.
          Le phénomène n’était pas nouveau, mais il s’accentue. J’en connais plusieurs cause, le Brexit en fait partie, avec à côté: les prix bas imposés par notre sécurité sociale, les flux tendus, la production chimique de qualité + ou – aléatoire…
          Une star devrait dénoncer ce scandale dans les médias…

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          • Squirrel, do you have any star in mind?

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            • En France, les soucis de santé de certains patients, avec la nouvelle formule du Levothyrox, n’auraient pas été autant médiatisés, si plusieurs personnes connues n’avaient pas relayé leur parole, avec leurs témoignages personnels d’actrices françaises.

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        • I was speaking to my daughter living in N.Ireland (and currently in the middle of the process to obtain dual Canadian/UK citizenship) about a small town that is stockpiling toilet paper in every nook and cranny because they made an error in order and have like a 10 year supply. I thought it was funny. Until she pointed out that she is quite stressed that her supply of insulin is quite seriously in jeopardy – as a Type 1 Diabetic, without it she would be dead in a week or so. For me, like I suppose it is for many, the real consequences of Brexit mess doesn’t really register until it is somewhat personal. My toilet paper story didn’t seem so funny to me anymore.

          Liked by 1 person

          • there’s an apparent insulin shortage in the US too (due to skyrocketing prices), and it’s truly worrying. I imagine there are quite a few things like insulin that would really mess up the UK. We’ve been joking about losing our avocados if DJT closes the US – Mexico border but it would be much worse than that.

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            • I had heard just a little bit about the prices going up – I don’t understand the the why of it though. Truly frightening to be in a situation when you need something that is literally life and death but you face the very real possibility of not being able to afford it.

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              • The short answer is the drug companies keep raising the prices, which means more andmore people (esp uninsured) can’t afford it. Demand in the US for insulin is relatively flat, but has increased in China, India, etc., by about 20 percent. Why the drug companies prefer to raise the price rather than produce more of it is something they’d have to answer. Their usual explanation is that they charge more for older drugs in order to finance new drug research, but that seems not to be the case (when it’s been studied).

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                • Perhaps also the rise of type 2 diabetes has put a strain on insulin supplies as well. Type 2 has been rapidly increasing not just in North America anymore but all over the world which is driven by frequency and type of food, unlike Type 1.

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                  • Insulin demand in North America is more or less flat, as I understand it, but increasing o/s the West (see previous comment).

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      • re: positivity — I don’t think our approaches are really compatible. I can’t live that way. I can’t allow myself to believe in things that are extremely unlikely to happen.

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        • I do not mean I’m living in a fantasy world where everything is roses and daffodils. I found out earlier this week a cold reality but if I took the approach: yep Trump is gonna get re-elected there’s nothing anybody can do done deal then how good is that? And I’m not saying to be clear that is your feeling. I’m speaking in general. I don’t have a dog in this Brexit fight. I am looking as an outsider/foreigner trying to understand what is going on when I know nobody in the government, political parties or the people know really what is going on. Quite honestly I would rather have relentless cheer for people and political, economic and social situations than constantly feeling morbid and apathetic. Again I am not saying that you are. I just think there is a lot of anger out there not only in the US but in Europe that is suppressed. That doesn’t mean I’m not realistic. It makes for interesting debate if nothing else. My original point was I wish Richard expounded more on his thoughts instead of #’s.

          Liked by 1 person

  4. Whatever did he tweet that for? I would’ve preferred if he had actually expressed an opinion. shrugs That hashtag is just vague.

    Liked by 5 people

  5. Julian Assange, le fondateur de WikiLeaks, a été arrêté. Ce serait un sujet bien plus interessant que le Brexit, sur lequel j’aimerais connaître son opinion.

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    • yeah — that actually drove both Brexit and Trump’s latest nonsense down the list of headlines in the US today. Scarcely to be believed.

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      • A shining example of what compelling spy movie story ought to be!
        Même dans leurs plus grandes heures, les scénaristes de Berlin Station n’auraient jamais pu imaginer un tel script. Maintenant, sachant que la série BS n’aura définitivement aucune suite, nous pouvons le déplorer. Ces scénaristes auraient chercher leur inspiration auprès de Dominique Moisy. Dans son livre: ” La Géopolitique des Séries”, il développait le cas où la réalité pouvait inspirer la fiction.

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  6. I like hashtags because they sum up a feeling in very few words, making a bigger impact (especially if it trends) than heavily worded explanations.when you have an existential crisis you’re trying to figure out where you fit in a life that isn’t going your way; you feel out of control but aren’t quite sure how you should deal with it. so in that sense, Brexit is the reality that Richard doesn’t want but is stuck with, and it’s making him feel out of control and not sure how to deal with it. that’s what I took the hashtag to mean, anyway.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Kelly, thank you… insightful as always. I seem to be having one of those existential crisis daily…
      I’m as you know an emoji girl but I may look into hashtags more now…

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    • The thing is that I just don’t know anyone IRL who uses hashtags that way. I use them, like most of my RL friends, for two purposes: to call attention to something (e.g., #richardarmitage on posts that will go out on Twitter) and to make an ironic or snarky statement (e.g., if I’m complain about some a disaster the US president is orchestrating, I’ll do #winning). I can’t think of the last time I used a hashtag to say something sincere or anything about how I’m feeling unless it’s snarky anger. If I feel out of control, a hashtag isn’t going to do it for me.

      I’m not discounting the possibility that Armitage was trying to say something sincere (and I don’t think he was being ironic or sarcastic), I just don’t think it is a necessary conclusion.

      Liked by 1 person

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