It’s really hard to say what will happen

Then again, this is what we need politicians for, to figure this out. Most of ours have been woefully lacking in the capacity to step up to the plate. Then again, we get the politicians we deserve. [still grading]

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~ by Servetus on May 21, 2020.

4 Responses to “It’s really hard to say what will happen”

  1. I have just read her comments, it’s tragic, yesterday the BBC did a short 30 minutes link with Juliet Stephenson Emma Thompson and Greg Wise (husband) and others with the history expert Mary Beard but none could really see a way forward.

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    • Unless there’s a really robust vaccine, it’s hard to imagine anything like mass events happening until the virus has really spread worldwide (in the sense that we’re about as afraid of it as we are of flu or colds).

      I had a ticket to an Elton John concert in April (now “postponed,” but given his age, I can’t imagine he’ll still want to be on stage when it’s safe to have a concert again). There are roughly 17,000 seats in that auditorium and I can’t personally imagine wanting to be in that big of a crowd ever again.

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  2. To be honest I don’t think theatre will ever recover. Events, concert and festivals won’t either. I shudder to think of all the people who are going to be and stay out of work

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    • Given her numbers (there have to be 60% sales or a production loses money), if you take 800 seats in the Harold Pinter Theatre, they’d have to sell 480 to break even at current prices. That wouldn’t even necessarily allow them to sell only every other seat, and that is still closer than 6 feet away. And all those people breathing the same air for 3 hours. So if they lose 40% of sales they’d have to raise prices by at least 40 percent to break event. That would be roughly GBP 120 for the seat I had. Most plays are not going to generate that level of enthusiasm (esp if the recession continues for long).

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