Twitter does not look good on you, and you do not look good on Twitter

Uch. Why am I still reading this nonsense?

~ by Servetus on July 7, 2020.

31 Responses to “Twitter does not look good on you, and you do not look good on Twitter”

  1. That’s a question I often ask myself, too. I’ve been taking a step back from Twitter lately – it’s increasingly becoming a dumpster fire, at least my feed is. About the only tweets I’m enjoying lately are the gardening ones.

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    • You are right. I should not engage. But I am like that live and twitter is no different. I think I follow you on twitter as well

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    • Mine too. I actually went there today in hopes I might see something interesting. Instead I saw Richard Armitage lose a playground battle.

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  2. I think he’s genuinely pissed. And I don’t get her comment either. Could not resist responding. Please do not be to harsh on my comments.;)

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    • I’m sure he is. So in response to that he decided to give those people exactly what they wanted — and then of course expose all his fans to it. Honestly. He needs to grow up. I get horribly mean comments from strangers all the time: I just ignore them.

      What you do is totally up to you.

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      • I never have commented here, but was really glad to see you back for a post as I do read them. Hope you and your father are holding up well. Appreciate your post and comments.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thanks for the comment — I do actually have an Armitage post (about Then & Now) mostly written. I picked up an additional summer class due to a resignation so it got delayed. thanks for the good wishes and hope you are well, too!

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  3. Well, because now you know that his father plays golf and is doing well at the moment 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Looks as if nobody’s is coming out of the whole thing looking good… zudem er dann heute noch einen draufgesetzt hat. Approach at own peril!

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    • ‘Seit nett zueinander und kauft meine Audiobooks!’ Augenroll

      Liked by 1 person

    • The person who laid into him, while perhaps not a troll, is (judging from her Twitter presence) also not someone who was actually going to listen to anything he said. She’d already made up her mind that subsidizing theatre = spreading coronavirus (even though as far as I can tell, that’s not what’s planned — they’re not asking for subsidies in order to reopen immediately, just to keep themselves from going further underwater while the doors are closed). It seemed to be the comment about his father that ultimately provoked him (is that what constitutes disrespect? honestly if I hear one more person saying “respectful discussion” I will spontaneously combust), and the result was that she got what he she wanted: his attention. I seriously doubt her father in Germany was at any risk of being infected by the temptation to attend a UK theatre.

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      • The OP certainly wanted a reaction, and phrased her tweets accordingly. I categorically disagree with the statement that arts are an unnecessary luxury and that workers in that industry shouldn’t whinge and demand government subsidies, after all they chose to work (as freelancers and artists) in a superfluous industry, but yep, that was a provocation that would easily bring everyone on board of a controversial discussion. Besides the mention of his father in her tweet I had the impression that her allusion that his often-quoted empathy was just an affectation, ticked him off, too. I get how such allegations really sting, and that he wanted to reply. What I don’t get is that he still doesn’t seem to understand what effect that has – within the discussion. Which he then eventually goes in to kill either by deleting his tweets, or by telling followers how to behave. I’m not surprised that fans jump to his aid – it’s always been like that. But this is a mechanism that has been seen many times before, and it never ends well and always chips off yet another piece of the beautiful piece of art (I nearly wrote “ass”) on the pedestal.

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        • Roflmao re the ass on the pedestal – eine echt Freud’sche Fehlleistung 😉

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        • Maybe she works for a book publisher and wants everyone to stop watching TV and go back to reading. I didn’t have much time for it, but most people I know watched oodles more TV / streaming than they normally would have.

          And no: you definitely don’t make any points by saying “I am empathetic” or “I do care about my father”. (Honestly the best thing he could do for his father after months in London with all that airborne illness was to stay away from him.) It indicates that the arrow hit the target. Which is what triggers the fans and as you say, he should know that by now.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Well, I have to say that I wondered too why he is ONLY focusing on the arts, except that that is where his interests lie and where his friends are, so I understand why that’s his first concern. But, there are many others that have been financially impacted and advocating for more broad-based measures seems to make more sense. That being said, I don’t know much about what is being done financially in the UK. On the other hand, I don’t have an urge to voice my opinions on Twitter at him.

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    • There was a big support package in March: small business loans, government support for wages / salaries for employees who were furloughed, a partial mortgage holiday, grants / tax breaks for self-employed people, equity purchases of airlines in order to keep them afloat. There was supposed to be an additional support plan for the hospitality industry. But in general, the welfare state is working much better in the UK than it is here. I stopped following it very closely a few weeks ago. The deal with the arts is that most of them didn’t quality under small business loans and many are already state subsidized on some level, so they don’t fall into a clear category the way pubs, factories and shops do.

      I think it’s not wrong to say that there are more important things than theatre, but only looking at the London economy, theatre ticket revenues alone generate more than a billion pounds of revenue, and obvs there are collateral gains (restaurants, hotels, transportation, etc.). It’s a huge draw for international tourists with lots of cash to drop. UK arts employ something like 2M people. So if the sector just collapses, it’s going to be a problem nationally. (NYC is dealing with a similar situation — what happens if Broadway dies? But they only cut their arts budget by about 10% for the next FY).

      Liked by 1 person

      • I haven’t been following much of that. I know more what is going on in Canada, which I guess sound similar to the UK. I didn’t realize the arts sector is so integral to London’s economy. If it was falling through the cracks then it makes sense to support it. I do find it interesting that RA is much more outspoken now than he was, whether we agree with what he might say or not. I don’t think I would do very well on Twitter either. It would be hard not to get into the playground battles.

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        • Some of that money will also go to museums and national landmarks, too, so all in all it’s maybe not quite the windfall it appears to be, and they have yet to solve a really serious problem, which is that the average West End theatre must sell 60% of seats in order to break even. Social distancing is going to be hard on that.

          re: outspoken — I suspect he thought he was preaching to the choir?

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          • The whole entertainment and hospitality industries will have to rethink their business models and live might not sustain a lot of them.

            I’m sure he did think he was preaching to the choir, but his fans are a diverse group of people who do not all necessarily want to be nice to each other. I’m just thinking that he is being more vocal about tweeting at/about politicians/political subjects than he used to be.

            Liked by 1 person

  6. I actually liked his angry comment . This prompt reaction shows me he is not only a merchandising and promoting machine. And I don’t care if he looks good. But the wilful supporters who comment every breath he takes get on my nerves, too.
    And, of course, he also speaks for himself with his pleas for support, which is totally understandable. The artists In Germany suffer, too, especially the freelancers. A few days ago I heard an interview with a well known local comedian who described exactly this struggle. No support, no system relevancy, no perspective and yet many people I know miss live cultural events most in these days.

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    • To me this kind of exchange makes him look weak. However, I agree that it also makes him look more human.

      This situation has really exposed how fragile our economy is in terms of its structure at the moment.

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  7. Hi Serv! This whole thing kind of made me cringe and laugh at the same time. It would be a lot of fun to cross-examine Armitage. He can’t seem to see the various angles of the traps people set for him.

    Liked by 1 person

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