Sickness unto death

Our cities are burning. My neighborhood in Tampa was on fire last night. Everything to be said seems to be too little and too much. I don’t have anything to add. It’s not my place to comment on the pieces of it that have to do with the oppression of Black people by police officers; I can’t imagine what that must be like. All I can do is insist that it’s wrong and steadfastly repel all the excuses people give for why it is the way it is. We had a demo in town yesterday. 97 percent of us are not Black; and yet 1,500 or us mustered the courage to go. We care, and it’s not enough. The one here stayed peaceful, but the deadly combination of white supremacists and antifa and people who’ve been cooped up for weeks, spoiling for a fight hit several other towns in the state. We will all burn together. It’s not a question of if, but when. What did we expect?

~ by Servetus on June 1, 2020.

23 Responses to “Sickness unto death”

  1. They haven’t mentioned it, but my city of Rochester, NY is in rough shape as well. Burned police cars, widespread damage, looting, etc. They have imposed curfew last night and tonight. They also stopped public transit completely. They are boarding up stores that haven’t been hit yet and have police surrounding the malls. They are bringing in about 200 NYS police for tonight, I’ve read. That doesn’t make me feel any better. 1918,1968 and 2008 all at once with no leader.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Well put. I was reading an article yesterday about what we expect a president to say in a situation like this and ours has done (as per usual) exactly the opposite.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Hi.
    I am not as eloquent as you and I am sure I will fail at explaining what is in my heart and mind

    Right now I’m fearful for my family in the US. I’m also fearful for my children who even in Canada and as young as they are, have still experienced some form of bullying even from neighbours adults and children alike. I have been teaching about acceptance and loving others no matter who they are. I have tried leading by example and cringe every time someone thinks I’m doing it wrong and should tell them or myself that I can’t have a certain lifestyle or travel because I’m black.
    It’s hard pill to swallow. As a parent you want the best for your child. I cried when watching the videos of what took place. My heart is still hurting. I have never regretted moving to the US. At this point I wonder, is there somewhere safe to raise my family so they will have a chance to be the best and be allowed to thrive and be seen as just human?

    Liked by 3 people

    • I see you as human. I’m so sorry for your suffering. There sure has been a lot of mansplaining to Black people in the last week (not that there isn’t plenty usually, but this really isn’t the time. Nor is it the time for virtue-signaling with words which is part of why this post is so short. There are things I could say but this is a real moment where “faith without works is dead” applies). It’s time for white people to shut up and listen before we do anything else.

      A (white) former student of mine who wrote her dissertation in this area and now teaches modern US history just posted on her FB that she doesn’t know what to say, she can’t be eloquent, so she decided to reduce it to saying “Black Lives Matter. Full stop. That’s the only conversation I am interested in. That’s the only conversation to be had.”

      As far as whether there’s a safe place: if it’s not a rhetorical question (I’m sure you’ve thought about it a lot), I personally think Canada is safer than the US for all kinds of people (except Native Americans). I read an article somewhere this week about someone who’s raising his kids in China for this reason. He doesn’t feel safe coming back to the US.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. We are under curfew here in Nebraska as well. A state of emergency has been declared and the National Guard has been activated. One person was shot and killed during rioting last night

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    • I’ve been surprised at the places where protest (and its side manifestations) have erupted — I saw yesterday that there are now protests going on in Europe and England. Stay safe.

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  4. I don’t know the words to say.
    I hope you’ll be safe.
    I hope we’ll all be safe.
    But we aren’t.
    Still, my thoughts are with you and everyone I know in the US.
    The world is burning, in many different ways.
    (I and my family are healthy at the moment.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad you’re okay. Thanks for the comment and thoughts.

      I live in a very safe part of the US (in fact, several years this decade my little town has been named the safest place to live in the state). But the lesson from this is that when one of us is not safe, all of us are not.

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  5. Please stay safe. You are in my thoughts, as of US, as my own country, as of the world.

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  6. I’m thinking of you all in the US.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I don’t know what to add here. My heart breaks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mine, too, and yet I can’t help but think this was inevitable at some point. Between circumstances on the ground, the way many local police forces are organized, and the way the current administration has acted to exacerbate the situation, this was just waiting to happen. And the thing is that even those of us who are not Black should be put on notice that our assumptions are no longer safe. On Saturday I was thinking “there’s no way the [our town’s] police would get violent, or do something like that, or fire on protestors.” And I thought: you can only think that because you’re white — and it might not be true any more. In my current position I have taught probably two dozen students who aspire to be law enforcement officers and in the classroom they are horrified by this kind of violence but then they go out … and yet they continue perpetuating the violence.

      Liked by 2 people

  8. What your passage said is true. And you are right, we don’t know what to expect next. It could a fire, a shooting, and a pandemic. But from the Bible we can answer to all different types of questions. Including the question”Will suffering ever end?”. The answer is found at Revelation 21:4 which reads: And he will wipe out every tear from their eyes, and death will be no more, neither will mourning nor outcry nor pain be anymore. The former things have passed away.” Doesn’t that sound like a world we would want to live in?!. If you have any questions feel free to reach me at 704-400-8181

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  9. Excuse me?

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  10. I am sorry if you thought I was trying to harass you. I was just trying to give you some good news, that you can share with your friends and family.

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    • You know, the very title of this post is a quotation from the Gospel of John. I suspect I’ve forgotten more about the Bible than you know about it, OR Christianity. Maybe you should google all the writing I did about Christianity (the religion of my childhood) and Judaism (the religion I chose as an adult), or about my mother’s deathbed, or the funeral at my parents’ church, before you make any assumptions about why I or my family know about “good news.” It’s radically more than you do, obviously.

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  11. And that number that I gave you, is incorrect. So, please do not call.

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    • I wouldn’t dream of it. But if you plaster your number on the Internet, you shouldn’t be surprised if people call.

      Like

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