Why we can’t talk enough about #stayathome

(and yes, I realize there are some people who can’t. I’m not talking to you. I’m talking to people who have the luxury of being able to retreat. And if you are staying at home, feel free to shut the window now.)

My father is 78, has heart disease, and moderate (stage 3) kidney disease. He is a stroke survivor. In the months since the stroke he has lost 20 percent of his body weight. He totters when he stands. He is considered medically frail and he has been legally medically incapacitated.

If you don’t want to read what’s happened this week, here’s the punch line: as much as you can control what you do, you have no control over the actions of other people.

  1. On Sunday, I took dad to church for the first time in months (long backstory there that I won’t get into). It was “Founders’ Sunday” and my parents moved here a few weeks after the church charter was signed. They were members 36 and 37 and he held every office in the congregation: trustee, usher, director, congregation president. He was the guy they called when the septic tank didn’t work, back when they still had one. The pastor sent him a personal letter asking him to come, so against my better judgment, we went. As we entered, a greeter told us that we should not touch anyone or shake hands, distance ourselves in the pews from other congregants, and that Lord’s Supper had been prepared with extra care to make sure no one touched the elements or the trays (we don’t have common cup). It was a good experience for dad as some of the previous pastors came back, and because he was a frequent figure in the slide show they showed, and because there were many other people who had been earlier church members there (who have moved away in the interval).  After church, one of these people – who’d been in New York City – came up to him and gave him a firm handshake before I could intervene, and said, “I’m not afraid of a little virus, are you?”
  2. Flower’s granddaughter teaches English in a school in South Korea (I’m not sure which city). Yesterday, she finally made it home (not sure about the path). South Korea has been on strict measures since mid-January (some details). Still, instead of self-isolating for fourteen days after coming back on an international flight, she came in to Flower’s house to give grandma (who’s 80, and also medically frail, and who hasn’t left her own house in months except to go to the doctor because she’s in so much pain she can barely walk) a BIG HUG! While dad was there. Dad said to me himself that he thought it was idiotic and assured me that he had no contact with the granddaughter. He doesn’t want to go there now until he knows the granddaughter is not sick. Really unfortunate, because it was his only remaining daily outing / social exchange, and Flower’s, too.

So yeah. You think you’re being careful, but in the end you can’t be, because people like Evangeline Lilly or my dad’s old friend or Flower’s granddaughter go out in public WHEN THEY DON’T HAVE TO (and in Lilly’s case, send their Petri-dish-like children out in public to mix it up a little) and spread viruses around and you don’t know who else they are touching or whether they are washing their hands or when.

In case you think I’m “hysterical,” one person who didn’t bother to take the recommended health measures basically gave the infection to half of Uruguay.

As much as he often aggravates me, I don’t want dad to die. Elderly and ill people are most at risk, and today the US government even admitted in public that the mortality right is twice as high for men as for women. Dad’s the person who’d be given a black wristband if we had to take him to the hospital. And due to the medical incapacitation, I as his agent would have to be in the hospital with him to the greatest extent possible.

To those who say “it’s just a bad flu,” please be aware that no medical professionals think that. Also, I had the “swine flu” when it coursed here about a decade ago — one person on the campus I was employed at died — and it was the sickest I’ve ever been. I coughed so hard that I shit myself — repeatedly.

So we’re staying at home except for essential trips (at this point, groceries, which are curbside pickup, and pharmacy — although I’m in process of switching us to prescriptions in the mail, because I went to the pharmacy today and when I asked politely for someone to stay six feet away from me, she cursed me out) and those where we can guarantee that we will meet no people. We will patronize businesses where we can pick up based on whether they have published their health measures.

Yes, we are doing this because we can. But if we can, why shouldn’t we? I know one elderly fellow fan who’s not letting her children visit even when they’re in the same city for some other reason just to protect herself and the public’s health. Why wouldn’t you do your part in a situation like this?

So yeah. STAY THE FUCK AT HOME. And if I know you’re not when you could, as little as it matters what I think, I’ll call you out for it. Abusively, if necessary. I don’t ever say (perhaps out of raising, perhaps out of superstition) “I hope you die.” But if you contribute materially to my father’s unnecessary death: I HOPE YOU DIE.

~ by Servetus on March 20, 2020.

74 Responses to “Why we can’t talk enough about #stayathome”

  1. You are so right. The last couple times I when shopping there where people who should have not been in the store. They where there with others while on oxygen. A very good way to get sick then pass it on to others since this virus spreads in droplet form.

    I was thinking about you and how it is going with your dad and if he understood the risks. I have not talked with my aunt about my uncle but my husbands cousin saw him at our local casino on Monday. He is of high risk but is mobile and I can see him out and about. Glad most of the places are shut down, and I don’t see him going food shopping but could see him at a hardware store. He also has asthma. I plan on calling my aunt in the next couple days to see how it is going. I just don’t see my uncle understanding any of this. My aunts most likely going to have a hard time keeping him at home and really not much we can do as I don’t want to go near him. I pretty much have gone out much this winter with out a job but with my husbands job he could bring something home.

    In fact my husband goes back to work tomorrow and really don’t want to but has no choice. As a police office I am really worried what him might get into but more to do with the virus. The whole thing with people buying so much had his department on at least one call while he was off work. He took vacation his last four days so we could spent it with our middle son who turned 21 last week. So its been almost 2 weeks since he was at work. He works four days on four days off. Could be dicey hard to say.

    Both you and your dad stay safe.

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    • Congrats to your son (and you)!

      dad: I didn’t think he was getting it, but I think he’s been watching a lot more TV since his morning breakfast round ended, and maybe it’s sinking in. (And he isn’t even getting the stuff I see over the Internet — he basically only watches the network news these days).

      I’m glad they’re closing the casinos and I hope your uncle is calming down. And I really hope your husband doesn’t get exposed.

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      • Thank you from my son and I . I sure hope that my uncle does somewhat understands. He can’t sit still for any length of time any more. I will be calling to see how bad it is. If nothing else my aunt can just air out her feelings. They never had a meeting for my husbands work and he wishes they would have. Have to see if they have any memos or what the guy he relives says. My husband all ready has a thing on how clean the squads are and his was in an accident while he was off. So first thing in the morning will be to clean out the one he is using. The other officers eat in the squads and pretty much leave them a mess which drives my husband crazy. He is hoping with this they will be cleaner. I doubt it.

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        • and do NOT underestimate how important that airing out of feelings is. I feel like a broken record with my friends these days but I need to let go of some stuff.

          if squad cars are anything like my car they must be horrible. Sympathies to your husband.

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          • Talked to my aunt and it seems that my uncle does at least some what understand about the virus. He will not shake hands at this time. He is walking about 2 to 3 miles a day for something to do. I believe staying away from people. She did say that her granddaughter who lives and works in New York City was exposed at work but so far has not gotten it, she also has asthma.

            My husband said that they are to try to do as much as possible by phone not in person. He did have to go to all the hair salons and spas/massage bushiness in town today to see if they where closed and if not tell to close up. He only found one open. Didn’t think where i get my hair would be open as the owner does my hair and her husband is waiting to have a kidney transplant.

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            • I’d been putting off my haircut and thinking “spring break” and now it won’t happen. Oh, well, I cut my own hair in college and I can do it again. I’m glad to hear people are complying up there. I am not sure they are here.

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              • New South Wales has now shut all non essential services but shops, petrol stations, pharmacies and HAIRDRESSERS remain open. That’s ridiculous. Having your hair done is not essential. My family will shortly be discovering my natural hair colour is not still brown!

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                • that is very weird! Wonder what the rationale for that is?

                  I’ve never colored (for various reasons) but my mother did till the month before she died. So I have no idea if my level of grey is normal or not.

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                  • I was going to need a hair cut and semi-premeanent color here in a couple weeks. But oh well, maybe try a box if I can find one. My mom and Grandma never colored their hair. My mom at 67 had less than 1/4 of her head gray till she found she had cancer, then pretty much when gray over night. I have been going gray since I was 25, stress. Where my mom never worried, I worried for her and got the gray early. I used to cut my hair in high school but will not try that for a while. I need better long layers to help my natural wavy/curly hair to lay right.

                    My husband said it was pretty quiet but there is an uptick in cars from Minnesota. We have heard the people with “cabins” (bigger than my house which is not tiny) are coming up here during the shut down. Not to happy about that, over burden the stores which are not planning on them being here yet and our health care. Heard there are coming from both the state just south and west of us.

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                    • My mom always used a box and imo it looked fine — however, it does leave a mess.

                      There was an article in our paper today about how we should definitely go in your direction because you don’t want us! (well, it was more polite than that, but it made the point that we shouldn’t overburden services in an underserved part of the state).

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                  • I have since found out it may be so that people with disabilities who rely on others to wash their hair can still use the service. But I wonder if it will be used as a loophole.

                    My hair started greying well before I turned 40 but I have a 64 year old friend who still has her natural colour. I think it is mainly down to genetics. My natural colour was almost jet black which was starting to age me anyway so even if the grey hadn’t come through I would probably have started to lighten it to stop me looking tired all the time.

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                    • You have a good point there, some people will try anything to get around the rules. I am pretty sure that all hair salons in the state that Servetus and I live are to be closed. Our governor is signing a Stay In Place order tomorrow. Not sure when it will take effect and what all jobs will be able to keep working. My middle son said that he would keep work as he works IT for a store chain at the corporate office. He said the most that would happen is a work from home. My oldest son not sure yet, his company makes weights for all kinds of scales including store scales and medical, post office. My husband as a police officer has no choice.

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                    • It’s also not clear to me how they will really enforce it. I mean, can’t you just leave your house and say you’re going to a grocery store? But I guess some businesses will close that have remained open. All the popular restaurants here are now hiring delivery people.

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                    • Interesting. I hadn’t thought of that but you know, it is so often the reason for things that confuse me (e.g., why I can buy already peeled oranges at my supermarket). There was a funny video on The Guardian today — Italian mayors yelling at their people on video about not going out. One of them was complaining about hairdressers who were going to private homes to do their jobs.

                      I always wanted to have jet black hair! (mine is about the same shade as Armitage’s natural color but I suspect he’s greyer than I am when he stops coloring).

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                    • I loved having black hair as a child as it was always remarked upon – my father had it too but he had dark skin and mine is fair like my mothers. But it’s very ageing. And without the services of a colourist very soon I will have to buy a bottle of dye or I will resemble Cruella DeVille!

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                    • You could get some Dalmatians …

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                    • From what I have read there is no way there going to enforce the order. I know that my husbands bosses have stated to do as much as they can by phone instead of face to face. He made it though his 4 day week and now gets 4 days off. My middle son who lives in a bigger city in the state south of us said that there was less cars on the road when he when to work this morning. My oldest son also has not been told not to come in to work, but there cousin is been told to stay home.

                      I think the thing with brown hair is it shows gray a lot faster then blond hair. My hair is dark brown but not as dark brown as my husbands, most people would have said it was black, but not him. My big problem is I have female pattern hair loss and the gray makes me look it I have more hair lost than I do.

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                    • Traffic is definitely down here, too. And of course, no school buses, etc.

                      I think you’re right about grey showing up faster in darker hair.

                      Sorry to hear about the hair loss. Are you looking into creative hats and headcoverings at all?

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                    • I was shocked when I was told that I had genetic hair loss (my parents both died with a full thick heads of hair, my mom’s dad was bald and that’s where it came from), I thought it was due to medications and even had a hysterectomy thinking that how blood I was losing during my period was causing the hair loss. I don’t regret the hysterectomy as my mom died from uterine cancer and there is a good chance I would have the same based on what they found when they took out my uterus. After that the hair loss keep on. I was told to use Rogaine which I did but it was messy and I couldn’t styling product after using the Rogaine till it dried. I also don’t think it worked well for me as I was still losing hair. I was looking for something less messy and found an shampoo and conditioner that is to grow back hair. Well it has not made my hair grow back but stopped the hair loss. I am not a hat person per say as they make my head hot other than winter. I do have a couple nice hats that I could wear for a special event but don’t. Things I have notice is when my bangs grow out they are wispy and hard to control. I have thought about getting rid of them but my hairdresser thinks it will make the hair loss stand out more. I guess we will see as I really need a hair cut and color. Oh well , my husband has always offered to cut my hair but he only gives guy hair cuts and I don’t think I would look good in his bald guy hair cut at all, shaved head. My two younger sons haven’t had hair cuts in a while. The middle son in 4 years other than a little cut to get rid dry ends last July that he had me give him. My youngest son it’s been almost a year and half. My husband keeps asking the youngest but has given up on the middle son. My husband has cut all their hair and his for years, after the oldest got a really bad hair cut when he was about 4.

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                    • There have been pictures circulating on FB of how we’re all going to look when this is over.

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  2. Part of the problem in my opinion has been a lack of leadership. It shouldn’t be up to people like you ( mainly speaking to the converted) to be imparting the public health information that governments should have implemented. I was listening to the British Radio 4 show Woman Hour this week which had a phone in on COVID-19 and their expert from the Department of Health was waffling on about herd immunity and chicken pox parties. Someone asked if her family, who were young and healthy, should should actively try to catch the virus and she said “that’s an interesting idea”. She basically said that we will all get it and some of us are unfortunately going to die of it as if we were discussing something minor. There was a very cross caller at the beginning who accused the Government of abandoning the elderly (aka people drawing government pensions and users of the nhs and no longer paying tax) and although the presenter shut that down I thought she had a valid point. The evidence that social distancing is the best way of containing this epidemic is overwhelming and yet most countries are sitting on their hands about forced lockdowns until it’s too late. So we are left in two camps – those who voluntarily isolate themselves and those who go out and infect.

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    • I agree the messaging on this has been execrable (worse in the US than in the UK but it’s been horrible in the UK, too).

      I can’t believe anyone still talks about chicken pox parties — that was something people should have stopped doing in the 70s (that’s how I got it — my brother had it and all the cousins came over for an afternoon). Getting chicken pox puts you at higher risk for shingles and there’s a vaccine now. People should get it. I honestly wouldn’t put intentionally trying to get seniors sick past the Johnson government. The way they handled the hospitality industry made it clear they couldn’t give a shit about those people, even if it is the third biggest sector of their economy.

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      • There has been a vaccine for chicken pox since the late 1990’s – my youngest had it as part of her pre school jabs before starting school in Sydney. But I think I am right in saying that it’s only available as a private prescription in the UK which I find shocking for all the reasons you have mentioned. And yes – I’m in complete agree with you regarding Boris and his social policies regarding seniors.

        I’ve just seen that Bondi Beach has been closed due to overcrowding. Words fail me.

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        • They had to start doing that in Florida, too. The spring breakers were arriving, and then the universities started closing. As I was walking out after my last lecture I heard a lot of chatter about going down early. I suspect Tampa is going to have a shelter in place order in the next 48 hours.

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    • “Je pense à ma retraite”, voilà ce que le personnel de santé prend comme référence, pour sélectionner les malades qui auront accès à l’oxygénothérapie, dans les hôpitaux français , quand la crise devient critique. 50% des personnes très malades en réanimation,ont moins de 60 ans, dixit les autorités de santé.
      Take care! Stay at home every body who can.

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      • The messaging on this has been horrible — the news kept saying it wouldn’t be bad for younger people. Nun haben wir den Salat, as the Germans say.

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  3. When I read info like this i’m so surprised. Here in Nebraska (at least the more populated areas) we have the 10 person or less law. Bars and restaurants are closed, no worship services, public buildings are closed, most people are working from home if possible, weddings are being postponed, lots of things like that. Theatres, gyms and casinos are all closed, as is the zoo. Also, I am banned from seeing the grand baby for fear of asymptomatic exposure. It seems like for the most part people are taking it seriously here.

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    • The day I took dad to church the state was at 50 or fewer. Now we also have 10 or fewer and all the restaurants and bars are closed (bars closing in WI is a sign of the apocalypse — they don’t even close when it snows 2 feet). But there are still plenty of people out and about, partially because the restaurants can still do take out / delivery, and partially because this is still a manufacturing area and people can’t do that remotely. However, IL instituted shelter in place today and I suspect that’s coming our way in a few days, too.

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  4. merci Servetus pour ce témoignage.

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  5. I don’t understand how many more people need to die before others finally get it. My youngest son was angry with me because he could not go visit his friends new born sisters. I told him to wait. I don’t have a fever anymore but we still don’t know. They will still be babies in a month.

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    • I’ve been wondering that myself.

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    • Indeed.

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    • “The aim is to put an end to the epidemic, by avoiding the creation of new homes. For this, it is generally estimated that more than 75% of the population must be immunized”. Alexandre Bleibtreuin on radio France Info.
      How could it be running?
      2 ways:
      – That could require that certain individuals be immunized via, for example, vaccination (not now) or the development of antibodies due to a primary contamination.
      * Thus, even if the virus continues to circulate, the more the rate of immunized people increases, the more the risk of meeting between a patient and a non-immunized person decreases. The threshold of immune people necessary to stop the spread of the virus depends on the contagiousness of the pathologies. Here it is a high % one.
      * “We are going to let the infectious agent circulate until a certain percentage of the population becomes sick and then develops antibodies,” specifies Alexandre Bleibtreu, infectious disease doctor at the service of infectious diseases at Pitié Salpêtrière in Paris.
      – Containment prevents transmission too.
      * The incubation period is 3 to 12 days. Also 15 days of confinement can prove the non-contagiousness of the detained persons.
      * These interventions “succeeded in reducing the number of cases” and generated “a general decrease in mortality”.
      * “However, the transmission rebounded after the controls were lifted,” said a report. Because once up, containment also leads to sudden contact of unimmunized people with infected people.
      * To avoid a rebound in the epidemic when recess strikes, experts from Imperial College (United Kingdom) recommended on Monday March 16, 2020 intermittent confinement for several months.
      Now the questions could be , how long and what about economy?

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  6. This pandemic reawakened some old demon. Cut out the dead wood – aka the poor, the old, the weak. Boris’ speech was repugnant; Tr*mp confirms to be an evil clown. My only hope is that this crisis will change the priorities of both politicians and voters. Stay safe 💖

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    • it’s a bit like the last election in the US: suddenly it was okay for everyone to air and revive all their racist baggage. So now it’s growing. People are saying now that since we’ve created a situation in which it will be insanely difficult to contain the virus, we should at least save the economy. I wonder how they think there will be an economy if everyone’s sick and dying.

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    • I HOPE…

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  7. I’m glad our federal state is imposing strict rules on any outside activities now. As a German comedian, who I normally don’t particularly like, said, it’s necessary, because there are to many stupid people. We still may go for a walk or jog (alone), buy groceries and get to places we need to be for a valid reason, but that’s it.
    All the best to you and your family!

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  8. Yeah, I couldn’t wish your last sentence on anyone but I agree that it is a scary time with some people being too careless about this! I hope you all stay well.

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  9. I agree entirely. I cohabitate with my 72 year old parents and I have become a paranoid person. I hate this feeling of constant dread. NC finally closed its beaches which is a relief to me. It should have happened sooner. We have a plan in case I start to show symptoms. They will decamp to my grandma’s vacant house.

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    • I really don’t know what we will do if I get it and all the hotels close. That was the final nail in the coffin as to my reasoning about staying home. It’s not just keeping dad away from it, it’s making sure I am still functioning.

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  10. Hear! Hear!

    The news reports from Italy where army trucks gather the dead and bring them to the nearest crematory and burry them without their loved ones present broke my heart today.

    So yeah ‘Stay the fuck at home if you can!’ is the message I want to share as well.

    Stay safe everyone and take care please ❤

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    • 🙂 I agree.

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    • yeah — this is astounding and upsetting, and I don’t why it’s not getting more press in the US. Of course, people who are aware of it are using it as fodder for their own POVs. Including a former fellow fan of ours who’s been spouting nonsense about this for about a month.

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      • I have no idea who that might be and that might be a good thing.
        I saw the news today a few minutes ago and the statistics are horrible 😦

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        • I’ve been really wrestling with my conscience on this because I feel she is concretely harming people (not illegal, but seriously immoral). I need to say something to her, I fear.

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          • You are a brave woman Servetus. Good luck – and I don’t mean that in a sarcastic way!

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            • We’ll see. We’re really getting to a crucial point here — most states are currently right in the window for doing anything effective, i.e., measures taken five days from now will have little effect — just as the president is threatening to lift restrictions at Easter (who knows why). There’s a strong possibility of conflict between federal and state troops if business tried to reopen (our current lockdown order is in place till two weeks after Easter). So I would really like this person to change her tune or at least shut up for a while.

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  11. “A NEW HOBBIT STORY SEQUEL”, about great solidarity, while we all the caregivers are waiting for masks:
    BE CAREFUL, IT IS JUST NOT TRUE.
    it’s a humorous, jocular article from a satirical newspaper
    it’s a made-up story, a kind of “fake news”

    http://www.legorafi.fr/2020/03/20/un-mage-un-elfe-un-nain-deux-hommes-et-4-hobbits-recrutes-pour-apporter-une-boite-de-masques-a-la-pitie-salpetriere/
    My son has just sent me this article, a few minutes ago.

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    • Sorry, direct from google traduction:

      “As the situation deteriorates more and more, an executive committee has met to give a primary mission to a small group of volunteers. A small group made up of a mage, an Elf, a Dwarf, two Men but also 4 Hobbits, all united in the same quest, that of bringing a box of masks to the Hospital of Mercy -Salpetriere. Reportage.

      “You have my ax,” said the Dwarf, rising above the negotiating table while the Grand Council finished its deliberation. “The question of bringing this box of masks is essential. The road will be full of dangers. We have no certificates for everyone and the Nazguls are very strict, “said Elrond, who fears for the health of the small group. “But with the help of Humans, they should do it. And these little Hobbits are resistant, they will have to overcome the rules of confinement to bring this precious, “said Gandalf, stressing that this mission was far more dangerous than anything he had undertaken so far.

      But in addition to the dangers of encountering contaminated Orcs on the road, the small group will also have to fight against the selfishness of some. “I know from a reliable source that a creature is looking for these masks, she wants them, for herself” adds the mage, moved by the audacity of the young Hobbit to devote himself, followed by his other comrades. “But other members of the community may be tempted to use these masks for them, I know it will happen.” “I’m never ready to defend these masks with my life”, said one of the two men. “But let’s admit that it remains very very pretty masks anyway.”

      But only a few hours after setting off for Pitié-Salpêtrière through the streets of Paris, the small group confronted Parisians seeking to seize the stock of masks, causing the community to disperse. The two isolated Hobbits, separated from the rest of the group, however, decided to continue their quest until the end.”
      BONNE LECTURE EN MEMOIRE DE THORIN!
      L’esprit du “Hobbit” vit toujours… et l’espoir aussi, notre président a annoncé une commande de masque…

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  12. Italian Regions have a lot of autonomy about health care. Lombardy recently renewed its system: more privatization, bigger zones, less GP, more economic efficency. Very praised, very exemplar; so exemplar that nobody dare say that maybe healing people was the purpose, not follow neo-liberal ideology. And here we are, a huge catastrophe, in the richest region of Italy.

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    • (: So sorry! J’espère que les responsables devront rendre des comptes à la population sinistrée par leur inconséquente course au profit immédiat, mais j’en doute. Et qu’ils en tireront les conséquences, mais à quel prix:!!! au prix de la vie de tant de personnes innocentes.

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    • we’re been going through a similar process here in rural areas — so that now there are parts of the country where whole counties don’t have hospitals. And yeah: it’s all neo-liberal arrogance. “Nothing bad will happen to us.”

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  13. I was reading your post – and on the last paragraph I thought to myself “Actually, that’s right – we should stay at home, even if our intention was only to go for a walk and not meet anyone on the way.” The more people stay inside, the less people outside – and less incentive for other people to think they can make an exception for themselves.
    The story of flower’s granddaughter makes me really angry because it totally illustrates how one person’s selfishness and ignorance will (knowingly) endanger the statistical 3 others. I hope your dad is reasonable and stays at home from now on, however hard it is on both of you.

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    • It’s really like they taught us about venereal disease (as it was called then) in sex education — you’re having sex with all your partner’s partners. Except now it’s breathing in the droplets.

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  14. You are so realy realy realy right!!!!

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  15. Maybe a little off-topic: I live in the middle of Philadelphia, less than two blocks from the iconic Art Museum. As a city-dweller in a busy part of town, my brain pretty much tunes out sirens, helicopters, delivery trucks, buses, etc. It suddenly dawned on me the other day that these noises are all but non-existent. The silence is deafening, and it’s really weird! I hope it means that crime, fires, and medical emergencies are way down; if so, there is some good coming out of all this.

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    • I hope so, too, but I think it’s just that certain kinds of crimes will become more frequent (domestic violence, child abuse will rise as people realize they can’t control their frustrations at staying home any more). I had heard somewhere that the cloud of pollution over China abated significantly, though.

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      • 🙂

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      • My husband has been told plan on more domestic abuse. They have also been told there will be more mental health calls and at this time no place in the state will take 72 hour hold patients. Not good when all they want is help. They don’t want to admit someone who might have the virus.

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        • I have heard that the domestic abuse calls are the worst. It’s terrible for everyone that there’s no safety valve at the moment.

          When they announced “safer at home” on TV they said you could be jailed for up to 30 days. I just snorted. They’re already not taking in people who’ve actually been arrested.

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          • I guess my husbands bosses have told that domestic abuse and OMV are the two they are to arrest for. He did have to go to a call at the jail for a jail fight during his last 4 days on. He had to investigate it. I guess we will see what happens. I know that when life is normal someone goes to jail in domestic abuse.

            Liked by 1 person

  16. […] [This joke inspired by Richard Armitage’s bathroom photo and a post by billiepops. Watch out for yourself and your family and neighbors, wash your hand, cough into your elbow, have safe sex, and stay home!] […]

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  17. Oh my gosh. I’m so sorry to hear about the dangerous insensitivity of Flower’s granddaughter.

    Our family is sans-livelihood, as so many others are, from the quarantine, that the necessary vs. non-essential distinction is painful to us.

    ((Hugs)) and stay safe!

    Like

    • Yeah. It’s horrible. If it’s any consolation in terms of how job security affects those who can work from home, this situation has a good chance of ending my professorial career. The major university system in my state announced changes today that will more or less eliminate jobs for most adjunct instructors (the permanent faculty at that campus will be doubling their course loads in the fall in order to keep their jobs, plus taking a pay cut), and the other university I work for is also struggling, so I don’t know if promised fall courses will materialize. I’ll be unemployed in about two weeks until at least September 1, and it’s really unclear what happens next for me.

      Like

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